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Items: 1 to 20 of 64

1.

Increased body weight

A change in overall body weight, relative to the beginning of the collection period. [from NCI_CDISC]

MedGen UID:
12145
Concept ID:
C0043094
Finding
2.

Diabetes mellitus

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. You can also have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Having prediabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes. Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your blood glucose level and take medicine if prescribed. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8350
Concept ID:
C0011849
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Clozapine

A synthetic dibenzo-diazepine derivative, atypical antipsychotic Clozapine blocks several neurotransmitter receptors in the brain (dopamine type 4, serotonin type 2, norepinephrine, acetylcholine, and histamine receptors). Unlike traditional antipsychotic agents, it weakly blocks dopamine type 2 receptors. It relieves schizophrenic symptoms (hallucinations, delusions, dementia). (NCI04) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
3128
Concept ID:
C0009079
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
4.

Weight gain

MedGen UID:
881038
Concept ID:
CN236654
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Diabetes mellitus

A group of abnormalities characterized by hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504609
Concept ID:
CN000766
Finding
6.

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is highly heritable, as shown by family, twin, and adoption studies. For example, for identical twins, if one twin develops schizophrenia, the other twin has about a 50% chance of also developing the disease. The risk of the general population developing the schizophrenia is about 0.3-0.7% worldwide. The search for “schizophrenia genes” has been elusive. Initial linkage studies looked at parts of the genome associated with schizophrenia, and many candidate genes were identified, including APOE, COMT, DAO, DRD1, DRD2, DRD4, DTNBP1, GABRB2, GRIN2B, HP, IL1B, MTHFR, PLXNA2, SLC6A4, TP53, and TPH1. However, some of these have later been questioned. Microdeletions and microduplications have been found to be three times more common in individuals with schizophrenia, compared to controls. Because these deletions and duplications are in genes that are overexpressed in pathways related to brain development, it is possible that the inheritance of multiple rare variants may contribute to the development of schizophrenia. Several genetic disorders feature schizophrenia as a clinical feature. The 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome comprises many different syndromes, of which one of the most serious is DiGeorge syndrome. Children born with DiGeorge syndrome typically have heart defects, cleft palate, learning difficulties, and immune deficiency. Schizophrenia is a late manifestation, affecting around 30% of individuals. Microdeletions and duplications in chromosome 1, 2, 3, 7, 15 and 16 have also been associated with schizophrenia. In 2014, a genome-wide association study looked at the genomes of over 35,000 patients and 110,00 controls. The study identified 108 SNPs that were associated with schizophrenia, 83 of which had not been previously reported. As expected, many of these loci occurred in genes that are expressed in the brain. For example, the SNPs included a gene that encodes the dopamine D2 receptor, DRD2 (the target of antipsychotic drugs), and many genes involved in glutamine neurotransmitter pathways and synaptic plasticity (e.g., GRM3, GRIN2A, SRR, GRIA1). More surprisingly, however, associations were also enriched among genes expressed in tissues with important immune functions. In 2016, a study based on nearly 65,000 people investigated the association between schizophrenia and variation in the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) locus—a region on chromosome 6 that is important for immune function. The study focused on the C4 gene (complement component 4) that exists as two distinct genes: C4A and C4B, which encode particularly structurally diverse alleles. The study found that the alleles which promoted greater expression of C4A in the brain were associated with a greater risk of schizophrenia. By using mice models, the study showed that C4 is involved in the elimination of synapses during brain maturation. In humans, “synaptic pruning” is most active during late adolescence, which coincides with the typical onset of symptoms of schizophrenia. It is therefore possible that the inheritance of specific C4A alleles could lead to “run away” synaptic pruning, increasing the risk of schizophrenia. Further research may even determine C4 as a potential therapeutic target. [from Medical Genetics Summaries]

MedGen UID:
48574
Concept ID:
C0036341
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
7.

Risk factor

Something that increases the chance of developing a disease. Some examples of risk factors for cancer are age, a family history of certain cancers, use of tobacco products, being exposed to radiation or certain chemicals, infection with certain viruses or bacteria, and certain genetic changes. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
48477
Concept ID:
C0035648
Finding
8.

Valproate

fatty acid with anticonvulsant properties. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
42595
Concept ID:
C0080356
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
9.

Schizoaffective Disorder

Mental disorder characterized by the presence of both affective disorder and schizophrenia-like symptoms. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
11334
Concept ID:
C0036337
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
10.

Diagnosis

Description:The source act is intended to help establish the presence of a (an adverse) situation described by the target act. This is not limited to diseases but can apply to any adverse situation or condition of medical or technical nature.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
8354
Concept ID:
C0011900
Finding
11.

Not significant

MedGen UID:
697304
Concept ID:
C1273937
Finding
12.

Schizophrenia

A mental disorder characterized by a disintegration of thought processes and of emotional responsiveness. It most commonly manifests as auditory hallucinations, paranoid or bizarre delusions, or disorganized speech and thinking, and it is accompanied by significant social or occupational dysfunction. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in young adulthood, with a global lifetime prevalence of about 0.3-0.7%. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506532
Concept ID:
CN117643
Finding
13.

History of previous events

The aggregate of past events; the continuum of events occurring in succession leading from the past to the present; a record or narrative description of past events. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
389153
Concept ID:
C2004062
Finding
14.

Mass of body structure

A benign or malignant pathologic structure in any part of the body, resulting from a neoplastic accumulation of cells, inflammatory cells, or cystic changes. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
108287
Concept ID:
C0577559
Finding
15.

History of

A record of a patient's background regarding health and the occurrence of disease events of the individual. In addition, personal medical history may be a variable in epidemiologic studies. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
82657
Concept ID:
C0262926
Finding
16.

Family history

Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, environment, and lifestyle. Looking at these factors can help you figure out whether you have a higher risk for certain health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but it does not mean that you will definitely get it. Knowing that you are at risk gives you a chance to reduce that risk by following a healthier lifestyle and getting tested as needed. . You can get started by talking to your relatives about their health. Draw a family tree and add the health information. Having copies of medical records and death certificates is also helpful. . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
69143
Concept ID:
C0241889
Finding
17.

Nutritional disorder

Disorders caused by nutritional imbalance, either overnutrition or undernutrition. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
811347
Concept ID:
C3714509
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Lipidemias

Abnormally high level of lipids in blood. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
317303
Concept ID:
C1706412
Finding
19.

Disorder of glucose metabolism

Pathological conditions in which the BLOOD GLUCOSE cannot be maintained within the normal range, such as in HYPOGLYCEMIA and HYPERGLYCEMIA. Etiology of these disorders varies. Plasma glucose concentration is critical to survival for it is the predominant fuel for the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
226229
Concept ID:
C1257958
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Disorder of hyperalimentation

An imbalanced NUTRITIONAL STATUS resulting from excessive intake of nutrients. Generally, overnutrition generates an energy imbalance between food consumption and energy expenditure leading to disorders such as OBESITY. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
219760
Concept ID:
C1257763
Disease or Syndrome
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