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1.

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a psychosis, a disorder of thought and sense of self. Although it affects emotions, it is distinguished from mood disorders in which such disturbances are primary. Similarly, there may be mild impairment of cognitive function, and it is distinguished from the dementias in which disturbed cognitive function is considered primary. There is no characteristic pathology, such as neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer disease (104300). Schizophrenia is a common disorder with a lifetime prevalence of approximately 1%. It is highly heritable but the genetics are complex. This may not be a single entity. Reviews In a review of schizophrenia, van Os and Kapur (2009) noted that in Japan the term schizophrenia was abandoned and the illness is now called integration-dysregulation syndrome. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
48574
Concept ID:
C0036341
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
2.

Schizophrenia

A mental disorder characterized by a disintegration of thought processes and of emotional responsiveness. It most commonly manifests as auditory hallucinations, paranoid or bizarre delusions, or disorganized speech and thinking, and it is accompanied by significant social or occupational dysfunction. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in young adulthood, with a global lifetime prevalence of about 0.3-0.7%. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506532
Concept ID:
CN117643
Finding
3.

Hyperhomocysteinemia

Hyperhomocysteinemia refers to above-normal concentrations of plasma/serum homocysteine. Plasma/serum homocysteine is the sum of the thiol-containing amino acid homocysteine and the homocysteinyl moiety of the disulfides homocystine and cysteine-homocysteine, whether free or bound to proteins (Malinow and Stampfer, 1994). Hyperhomocysteinemia in isolation may be associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and recurrent arterial and venous thrombosis usually in the third or fourth decade of life (review by Welch and Loscalzo, 1998). Homocysteinemia is also a feature of several inherited metabolic disorders, including homocystinuria (236200), due to mutation in the CBS gene (613381), and N(5,10)-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency (236250), caused by mutation in the MTHFR gene (607093). Homocysteinemia/homocystinuria and megaloblastic anemia can result from defects in vitamin B12 (cobalamin; cbl) metabolism, which have been classified according to complementation groups of cells in vitro; see cblE (236270) and cblG (250940). See also the various forms of combined methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) and homocystinuria due to disorders of cobalamin: cblC (277400), cblD (277410), and cblF (277380). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
108623
Concept ID:
C0598608
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Maternal phenylketonuria

A condition occurring in untreated or partially treated females with PHENYLKETONURIA when they become pregnant. This may result in damages to the FETUS, including MICROCEPHALY; MENTAL RETARDATION; congenital heart disease; FETAL GROWTH RETARDATION; and CRANIOFACIAL ABNORMALITIES. (From Am J Med Genet 1997 Mar 3;69(1):89-95) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
88435
Concept ID:
C0085547
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Pregnancy

So you're going to have a baby! Whether you are pregnant or are planning to get pregnant, you will want to give your baby a healthy start. You need to have regular visits with your healthcare provider. These prenatal care visits are very important for your baby and yourself. Some things you might do when you are pregnant could hurt your baby, such as smoking or drinking. Some medicines can also be a problem, even ones that a doctor prescribed. You will need to drink plenty of fluids and eat a healthy diet. You may also be tired and need more rest. Your body will change as your baby grows during the nine months of your pregnancy. Don't hesitate to call your health care provider if you think you have a problem or something is bothering or worrying you. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10895
Concept ID:
C0032961
Organism Function
6.

Multiple congenital anomalies

MedGen UID:
7806
Concept ID:
C0000772
Congenital Abnormality
7.

Arthritis

If you feel pain and stiffness in your body or have trouble moving around, you might have arthritis. Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, a swollen joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such as your eyes or skin. Types of arthritis include. -Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. It's often related to aging or to an injury. -Autoimmune arthritis happens when your body's immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common form of this kind of arthritis. -Juvenile arthritis is a type of arthritis that happens in children. -Infectious arthritis is an infection that has spread from another part of the body to the joint. -Psoriatic arthritis affects people with psoriasis. -Gout is a painful type of arthritis that happens when too much uric acid builds up in the body. It often starts in the big toe. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2043
Concept ID:
C0003864
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Immunodeficiency

MedGen UID:
505335
Concept ID:
CN002471
Finding
9.

Rheumatoid arthritis

Inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures with widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, as well as atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504816
Concept ID:
CN001255
Finding
10.

Arthritis

Inflammation of a joint. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504815
Concept ID:
CN001254
Finding
11.

Developmental disorder

Developmental disabilities are severe, long-term problems. They may be physical, such as blindness. They may affect mental ability, such as learning disorders. Or the problem can be both physical and mental, such as Down syndrome. The problems are usually life-long, and can affect everyday living. . There are many causes of developmental disabilities, including. -Genetic or chromosome abnormalities. These cause conditions such as Down syndrome and Rett syndrome. -Prenatal exposure to substances. Drinking alcohol when pregnant can cause fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. -Certain viral infections during pregnancy. -Preterm birth. Often there is no cure, but treatment can help the symptoms. Treatments include physical, speech, and occupational therapy. Special education classes and psychological counseling can also help. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3367
Concept ID:
C0008073
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
12.

Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease, primarily of the joints, with autoimmune features and a complex genetic component. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
2078
Concept ID:
C0003873
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Vitamin B6 deficiency

A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of VITAMIN B 6 in the diet, characterized by dermatitis, glossitis, cheilosis, and stomatitis. Marked deficiency causes irritability, weakness, depression, dizziness, peripheral neuropathy, and seizures. In infants and children typical manifestations are diarrhea, anemia, and seizures. Deficiency can be caused by certain medications, such as isoniazid. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
215231
Concept ID:
C0936215
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Hyperphenylalaninemia due to tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency

MedGen UID:
199656
Concept ID:
C0751436
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Hyperphenylalaninemia, non-pku

An increased concentration of L-phenylalanine in the blood. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
155558
Concept ID:
C0751435
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Malnutrition

Food provides the energy and nutrients you need to be healthy. If you don't get enough nutrients -- including proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, and minerals - you may suffer from malnutrition. Causes of malnutrition include:. -Lack of specific nutrients in your diet. Even the lack of one vitamin can lead to malnutrition. -An unbalanced diet. -Certain medical problems, such as malabsorption syndromes and cancers. Symptoms may include fatigue, dizziness, and weight loss. Or, you may have no symptoms. To diagnose the cause of the problem, your doctor may do blood tests and a nutritional assessment. Treatment may include replacing the missing nutrients and treating the underlying cause.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
56429
Concept ID:
C0162429
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Folate deficiency

A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of FOLIC ACID in the diet. Many plant and animal tissues contain folic acid, abundant in green leafy vegetables, yeast, liver, and mushrooms but destroyed by long-term cooking. Alcohol interferes with its intermediate metabolism and absorption. Folic acid deficiency may develop in long-term anticonvulsant therapy or with use of oral contraceptives. This deficiency causes anemia, macrocytic anemia, and megaloblastic anemia. It is indistinguishable from vitamin B 12 deficiency in peripheral blood and bone marrow findings, but the neurologic lesions seen in B 12 deficiency do not occur. (Merck Manual, 16th ed) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
42057
Concept ID:
C0016412
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Cobalamin deficiency

A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of VITAMIN B 12 in the diet, characterized by megaloblastic anemia. Since vitamin B 12 is not present in plants, humans have obtained their supply from animal products, from multivitamin supplements in the form of pills, and as additives to food preparations. A wide variety of neuropsychiatric abnormalities is also seen in vitamin B 12 deficiency and appears to be due to an undefined defect involving myelin synthesis. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p848) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
21880
Concept ID:
C0042847
Disease or Syndrome
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