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Items: 5

1.

Familial adenomatous polyposis 1

APC-associated polyposis conditions include: familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), attenuated FAP, and gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS). FAP is a colon cancer predisposition syndrome in which hundreds to thousands of adenomatous colonic polyps develop, beginning, on average, at age 16 years (range 7-36 years). By age 35 years, 95% of individuals with FAP have polyps; without colectomy, colon cancer is inevitable. The mean age of colon cancer diagnosis in untreated individuals is 39 years (range 34-43 years). Extracolonic manifestations are variably present and include: polyps of the gastric fundus and duodenum, osteomas, dental anomalies, congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE), soft tissue tumors, desmoid tumors, and associated cancers. Attenuated FAP is characterized by multiple colonic polyps (average of 30), more proximally located polyps, and a diagnosis of colon cancer at a later age than in FAP. Certain extracolonic manifestations, such as gastric and duodenal polyps or cancers, are variably present in attenuated FAP; risk management may be substantially different between FAP and attenuated FAP. GAPPS is characterized by gastric fundic gland polyposis, increased risk of gastric cancer, and limited colonic involvement in most individuals reported. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
398651
Concept ID:
C2713442
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Hepatocellular carcinoma

Hepatocellular carcinoma is the major histologic type of malignant primary liver neoplasm. It is the fifth most common cancer and the third most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. The major risk factors for HCC are chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, prolonged dietary aflatoxin exposure, alcoholic cirrhosis, and cirrhosis due to other causes. Hepatoblastomas comprise 1 to 2% of all malignant neoplasms of childhood, most often occurring in children under 3 years of age. Hepatoblastomas are thought to be derived from undifferentiated hepatocytes (Taniguchi et al., 2002). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
389187
Concept ID:
C2239176
Neoplastic Process
3.

Desmoid disease, hereditary

Hereditary desmoid disease usually presents as an extraintestinal manifestation of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP; 175100), also known as Gardner syndrome, which is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by germline mutation in the APC gene. The desmoid tumors are usually intraabdominal and, although benign, can be locally aggressive and result in significant morbidity. Desmoid tumors can also arise sporadically (Couture et al., 2000). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
338210
Concept ID:
C1851124
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Carcinoma of colon

Lynch syndrome, caused by a germline pathogenic variant in a mismatch repair gene and associated with tumors exhibiting microsatellite instability (MSI), is characterized by an increased risk for colon cancer and cancers of the endometrium, ovary, stomach, small intestine, hepatobiliary tract, urinary tract, brain, and skin. In individuals with Lynch syndrome the following life time risks for cancer are seen: 52%-82% for colorectal cancer (mean age at diagnosis 44-61 years); 25%-60% for endometrial cancer in women (mean age at diagnosis 48-62 years); 6% to 13% for gastric cancer (mean age at diagnosis 56 years); and 4%-12% for ovarian cancer (mean age at diagnosis 42.5 years; approximately 30% are diagnosed before age 40 years). The risk for other Lynch syndrome-related cancers is lower, though substantially increased over general population rates. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
147065
Concept ID:
C0699790
Neoplastic Process
5.

Neoplasm of stomach

In a review article on the genetic predisposition to gastric cancer, Bevan and Houlston (1999) concluded that several genes may be associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. Gastric cancer is a manifestation of a number of inherited cancer predisposition syndromes, including hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC1; see 120435), familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP; 175100), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS; 175200), Cowden disease (CD; 158350), and the Li-Fraumeni syndrome (151623). See also hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC; 137215). Canedo et al. (2007) provided a review of genetic susceptibility to gastric cancer in patients infected with Helicobacter pylori (see 600263). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
20958
Concept ID:
C0038356
Neoplastic Process
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