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1.

Age-related macular degeneration 14

Age-related macular degeneration is an eye disease that is a leading cause of vision loss in older people in developed countries. The vision loss usually becomes noticeable in a person's sixties or seventies and tends to worsen over time.Age-related macular degeneration mainly affects central vision, which is needed for detailed tasks such as reading, driving, and recognizing faces. The vision loss in this condition results from a gradual deterioration of light-sensing cells in the tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color (the retina). Specifically, age-related macular degeneration affects a small area near the center of the retina, called the macula, which is responsible for central vision. Side (peripheral) vision and night vision are generally not affected, but reduced dim light (scotopic) vision often occurs in the early stages of the disease.Researchers have described two major types of age-related macular degeneration, known as the dry form and the wet form. The dry form is much more common, accounting for 85 to 90 percent of all cases of age-related macular degeneration. It is characterized by a buildup of yellowish deposits called drusen beneath the retina and vision loss that worsens slowly over time. The condition typically affects vision in both eyes, although vision loss often occurs in one eye before the other.The wet form of age-related macular degeneration is associated with severe vision loss that can worsen rapidly. This form of the condition is characterized by the growth of abnormal, fragile blood vessels underneath the macula. These vessels leak blood and fluid, which damages the macula and makes central vision appear blurry and distorted.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
815983
Concept ID:
C3809653
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Complement component 2 deficiency

Complement component 2 deficiency is a disorder that causes the immune system to malfunction, resulting in a form of immunodeficiency. Immunodeficiencies are conditions in which the immune system is not able to protect the body effectively from foreign invaders such as bacteria and viruses. People with complement component 2 deficiency have a significantly increased risk of recurrent bacterial infections, specifically of the lungs (pneumonia), the membrane covering the brain and spinal cord (meningitis), and the blood (sepsis), which may be life-threatening. These infections most commonly occur in infancy and childhood and become less frequent in adolescence and adulthood.Complement component 2 deficiency is also associated with an increased risk of developing autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or vasculitis. Autoimmune disorders occur when the immune system malfunctions and attacks the body's tissues and organs. Between 10 and 20 percent of individuals with complement component 2 deficiency develop SLE. Females with complement component 2 deficiency are more likely to have SLE than affected males, but this is also true of SLE in the general population.The severity of complement component 2 deficiency varies widely. While some affected individuals experience recurrent infections and other immune system difficulties, others do not have any health problems related to the disorder.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
461625
Concept ID:
C3150275
Disease or Syndrome

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