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1.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1O

MedGen UID:
414534
Concept ID:
C2752007
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2H

Syndrome with characteristics of severe psychomotor retardation, failure to thrive and intolerance to wheat and dairy products. So far, only two cases have been described. The disease is caused by mutations in the COG8 gene, which encodes a subunit of the COG complex. This complex is involved vesicle transport in the Golgi apparatus. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
409971
Concept ID:
C1970021
Disease or Syndrome
3.
4.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1B

Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by enzymatic defects in the synthesis and processing of asparagine (N)-linked glycans or oligosaccharides on glycoproteins. Type I CDGs comprise defects in the assembly of the dolichol lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) chain and its transfer to the nascent protein. These disorders can be identified by a characteristic abnormal isoelectric focusing profile of plasma transferrin (Leroy, 2006). For a discussion of the classification of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). CDG Ib is clinically distinct from most other CDGs by the lack of significant central nervous system involvement. The predominant symptoms are chronic diarrhea with failure to thrive and protein-losing enteropathy with coagulopathy. Some patients develop hepatic fibrosis. CDG Ib is also different from other CDGs in that it can be treated effectively with oral mannose supplementation, but can be fatal if untreated (Marquardt and Denecke, 2003). Thus, CDG Ib should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with unexplained hypoglycemia, chronic diarrhea, liver disease, or coagulopathy in order to allow early diagnosis and effective therapy (Vuillaumier-Barrot et al., 2002) Freeze and Aebi (1999) reviewed CDG Ib and CDG Ic (603147). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
400692
Concept ID:
C1865145
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1C

Congenital disorders of glycosylation, previously called carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndromes (CDGSs), are caused by defects in mannose addition during N-linked oligosaccharide assembly. CDGs can be divided into 2 types, depending on whether they impair lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) assembly and transfer (CDG I), or affect trimming of the protein-bound oligosaccharide or the addition of sugars to it (CDG II) (Orlean, 2000). CDG Ic is characterized by psychomotor retardation with delayed walking and speech, hypotonia, seizures, and sometimes protein-losing enteropathy. It is the second largest subtype of CDG (summary by Sun et al., 2005). For a discussion of the classification of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). Freeze and Aebi (1999) reviewed CDG Ib (602579) and CDG Ic. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
400469
Concept ID:
C1864178
6.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1N

Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by enzymatic defects in the synthesis and processing of asparagine (N)-linked glycans or oligosaccharides on glycoproteins. Type I CDGs comprise defects in the assembly of the dolichol lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) chain and its transfer to the nascent protein. These disorders can be identified by a characteristic abnormal isoelectric focusing profile of plasma transferrin (Leroy, 2006). For a discussion of the classification of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
383145
Concept ID:
C2677590
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1G

Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), previously called carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndromes (CDGSs), are a group of hereditary multisystem disorders first recognized by Jaeken et al. (1980). The characteristic biochemical abnormality of CDGs is the hypoglycosylation of glycoproteins, which is routinely determined by isoelectric focusing (IEF) of serum transferrin. Type I CDG comprises those disorders in which there is a defect in the assembly of lipid-linked oligosaccharides or their transfer onto nascent glycoproteins, whereas type II CDG comprises defects of trimming, elongation, and processing of protein-bound glycans. For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065) and CDG1B (602579). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
375947
Concept ID:
C1846695
8.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1H

CDGs, previously called carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndromes, grew from hereditary multisystem disorders first recognized by Jaeken et al. (1980). The characteristic biochemical abnormality of CDGs is the hypoglycosylation of glycoproteins, which is routinely determined by isoelectric focusing of serum transferrin. Type I CDG comprises those disorders in which there is a defect in the assembly of lipid-linked oligosaccharides or their transfer onto nascent glycoproteins, whereas type II CDG comprises defects of trimming, elongation, and processing of protein-bound glycans. For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
374956
Concept ID:
C1842539
9.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2F

MedGen UID:
370234
Concept ID:
C1970344
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2B

MedGen UID:
342954
Concept ID:
C1853736
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2D

Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a group of hereditary multisystem disorders that are commonly associated with severe psychomotor and mental retardation. The characteristic biochemical abnormality of CDGs is the hypoglycosylation of glycoproteins, which is routinely determined by isoelectric focusing (IEF) of serum transferrin. Type I CDG comprises those disorders in which there is a defect in the assembly of lipid-linked oligosaccharides or their transfer onto nascent glycoproteins, whereas type II CDG comprises defects of trimming, elongation, and processing of protein-bound glycans (summary by Hansske et al., 2002). For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
339615
Concept ID:
C1846816
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1I

MedGen UID:
334618
Concept ID:
C1842836
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1J

Like all CDGs, which are caused by a shortage of precursor monosaccharide phosphate or deficiencies in the glycosyltransferases required for lipid-linked oligosaccharide precursor (LLO) synthesis, CDG Ij is caused by a defect in the formation of DPAGT1, the first dolichyl-linked intermediate of the protein N-glycosylation pathway. For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
334113
Concept ID:
C1842572
14.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1K

Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) comprise a group of multisystem diseases with mostly severe psychomotor and mental retardation. Type I CDG comprises those disorders in which there are defects that affect biosynthesis of dolichol-linked oligosaccharides in the cytosol or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), as well as defects involving the transfer of oligosaccharides onto nascent glycoproteins. Type II CDG comprises all defects of further trimming and elongation of N-linked oligosaccharides in the ER and Golgi (Schwarz et al., 2004). For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
332969
Concept ID:
C1837896
15.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2E

CDG IIe is caused by a mutation that impairs the integrity of the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex and alters Golgi trafficking, resulting in the disruption of multiple glycosylation pathways. For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
332451
Concept ID:
C1837437
16.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1M

DOLK-congenital disorder of glycosylation (DOLK-CDG, formerly known as congenital disorder of glycosylation type Im) is an inherited condition that often affects the heart but can also involve other body systems. The pattern and severity of this disorder's signs and symptoms vary among affected individuals.Individuals with DOLK-CDG typically develop signs and symptoms of the condition during infancy or early childhood. Nearly all individuals with DOLK-CDG develop a weakened and enlarged heart (dilated cardiomyopathy). Other frequent signs and symptoms include recurrent seizures; developmental delay; poor muscle tone (hypotonia); and dry, scaly skin (ichthyosis). Less commonly, affected individuals can have distinctive facial features, kidney disease, hormonal abnormalities, or eye problems.Individuals with DOLK-CDG typically do not survive into adulthood, often because of complications related to dilated cardiomyopathy, and some do not survive past infancy. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
332072
Concept ID:
C1835849
Disease or Syndrome
17.

CONGENITAL DISORDER OF GLYCOSYLATION, TYPE Il

Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) that represent defects of dolichol-linked oligosaccharide assembly are classified as CDG type I. For a general description and a discussion of the classification of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
324794
Concept ID:
C1837438
18.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1D

Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by enzymatic defects in the synthesis and processing of asparagine (N)-linked glycans or oligosaccharides on glycoproteins. Type I CDGs comprise defects in the assembly of the dolichol lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) chain and its transfer to the nascent protein. These disorders can be identified by a characteristic abnormal isoelectric focusing profile of plasma transferrin (Leroy, 2006). For a discussion of the classification of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
322026
Concept ID:
C1832736
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2C

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIc (CDG2C) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by moderate to severe psychomotor retardation, mild dysmorphism, and impaired neutrophil motility. It is a member of a group of disorders with a defect in the processing of protein-bound glycans. For a general overview of congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs), see CDG1A (212065) and CDG2A (212066). The neutrophil defect in CDG2C has been referred to as 'leukocyte adhesion deficiency type II' (LAD2), which is a manifestation of the disorder; there are no cases of 'primary' LAD II (Frydman, 1996). Etzioni and Harlan (1999) provided a comprehensive review of both LAD1 (116920) and LAD2. While the functional neutrophil studies are similar in the 2 LADs, the clinical course is milder in LAD2. Furthermore, patients with LAD2 present other abnormal features, such as growth and mental retardation, which are related to the primary defect in fucose metabolism. Delayed separation of the umbilical cord occurs in LAD1. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
162913
Concept ID:
C0796132
20.

Carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type I

PMM2-CDG (CDG-Ia) (previously known as congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1a), the most common of a group of disorders of abnormal glycosylation of N-linked oligosaccharides, is divided into three types: infantile multisystem, late-infantile and childhood ataxia-intellectual disability, and adult stable disability. The three types notwithstanding, clinical presentation and course are highly variable, ranging from infants who die in the first year of life to mildly involved adults. Clinical presentations tend to be similar in sibs. In the infantile multisystem type, infants show axial hypotonia, hyporeflexia, esotropia, and developmental delay. Feeding problems, vomiting, failure to thrive, and impaired growth are frequently seen. Subcutaneous fat may be excessive over the buttocks and suprapubic region. Two distinct clinical presentations are observed: (1) a non-fatal neurologic form with strabismus, psychomotor retardation, and cerebellar hypoplasia in infancy followed by neuropathy and retinitis pigmentosa in the first or second decade and (2) a neurologic-multivisceral form with approximately 20% mortality in the first year of life. The late-infantile and childhood ataxia-intellectual disability type, with onset between age three and ten years, is characterized by hypotonia, ataxia, severely delayed language and motor development, inability to walk, and IQ of 40 to 70; other findings include seizures, stroke-like episodes or transient unilateral loss of function, retinitis pigmentosa, joint contractures, and skeletal deformities. In the adult stable disability type, intellectual ability is stable; peripheral neuropathy is variable, thoracic and spinal deformities progress, and premature aging is observed; females lack secondary sexual development and males may exhibit decreased testicular volume. Hyperglycemia-induced growth hormone release, hyperprolactinemia, insulin resistance, and coagulopathy may occur. An increased risk for deep venous thrombosis is present. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
138111
Concept ID:
C0349653
Disease or Syndrome
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