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Items: 16

1.

Heterotaxy, visceral, 7, autosomal

Autosomal visceral heterotaxy-7 is an autosomal recessive developmental disorder characterized by complex congenital heart malformations and/or situs inversus and caused by defects in the normal left-right asymmetric positioning of internal organs. The phenotype is variable (summary by Guimier et al., 2015). For a discussion of the genetic heterogeneity of visceral heterotaxy, see HTX1 (306955). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
852359
Concept ID:
CN235018
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Coronary heart disease 6

MedGen UID:
482543
Concept ID:
C3280913
Finding
3.

Amelogenesis imperfecta, hypomaturation type, IIA2

Autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta pigmented hypomaturation type is characterized by enamel of normal thickness that is hypomineralized and has a mottled appearance. The slightly soft enamel detaches easily from the dentin, and radiographs show a lack of contrast between enamel and dentin (Witkop, 1989). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
436540
Concept ID:
C2675858
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Metaphyseal anadysplasia 2

MedGen UID:
414350
Concept ID:
C2751322
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Cavitary optic disc anomalies

MedGen UID:
370593
Concept ID:
C1969063
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Susceptibility to malaria

Malaria, a major cause of child mortality worldwide, is caused by mosquito-borne hematoprotozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. Of the 4 species that infect humans, P. falciparum causes the most severe forms of malaria and is the major cause of death and disease. Although less fatal, P. malariae, P. ovale, and, in particular, P. vivax infections are major causes of morbidity. The parasite cycle involves a first stage in liver cells and a subsequent stage at erythrocytes, when malaria symptoms occur. A wide spectrum of phenotypes are observed, from asymptomatic infection to mild disease, including fever and mild anemia, to severe disease, including cerebral malaria, profound anemia, and respiratory distress. Genetic factors influence the response to infection, as well as disease progression and severity. Malaria is the strongest known selective pressure in the recent history of the human genome, and it is the evolutionary driving force behind sickle-cell disease (603903), thalassemia (see 141800), glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (300908), and other erythrocyte defects that together constitute the most common mendelian diseases of humans (Kwiatkowski, 2005; Campino et al., 2006). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
370149
Concept ID:
C1970028
Finding
7.

Asthma, susceptibility to

Bronchial asthma is the most common chronic disease affecting children and young adults. It is a complex genetic disorder with a heterogeneous phenotype, largely attributed to the interactions among many genes and between these genes and the environment. Asthma-related traits include clinical symptoms of asthma, such as coughing, wheezing, and dyspnea; bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) as assessed by methacholine challenge test; serum IgE levels; atopy; and atopic dermatitis (Laitinen et al., 2001; Illig and Wjst, 2002; Pillai et al., 2006). See 147050 for information on the asthma-associated phenotype atopy. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
358271
Concept ID:
C1869116
Finding
8.

Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Missouri type

MedGen UID:
355563
Concept ID:
C1865832
Disease or Syndrome
9.

BLOOD GROUP--OK

MedGen UID:
350623
Concept ID:
C1862209
Intellectual Product
10.

Multicentric osteolysis, nodulosis and arthropathy

Zankl et al. (2007) defined what they considered to be a continuous clinical spectrum involving Torg syndrome, Winchester syndrome (277950), and NAO syndrome. Torg syndrome is characterized by the presence of multiple, painless, subcutaneous nodules and mild to moderate osteoporosis and osteolysis that is usually limited to the hands and feet. Radiographically, the osteolysis is accompanied by a characteristic widening of the metacarpal and metatarsal bones. Winchester syndrome presents with severe osteolysis in the hands and feet and generalized osteoporosis and bone thinning, similar to NAO, but subcutaneous nodules are characteristically absent. Various additional features including coarse face, corneal opacities, gum hypertrophy, and EKG changes have been reported. NAO syndrome, which has only been described in patients from Saudi Arabia, is generally more severe, with multiple prominent and painful subcutaneous nodules, massive osteolysis in the hands and feet, and generalized osteoporosis. Coarse face and body hirsutism are additional features. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
342428
Concept ID:
C1850155
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Sorsby fundus dystrophy

Sorsby fundus dystrophy is an autosomal dominant retinal dystrophy characterized by the loss of central vision as a result of macular disease by the fourth to fifth decade and peripheral visual loss in late life (summary by Wijesuriya et al., 1996). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
338164
Concept ID:
C1850938
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, Spahr type

MedGen UID:
140928
Concept ID:
C0432225
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Winchester syndrome

Winchester syndrome presents with severe osteolysis in the hands and feet and generalized osteoporosis and bone thinning, similar to multicentric osteolysis, nodulosis, and arthropathy (MONA; 259600), but subcutaneous nodules are characteristically absent. Various additional features including coarse face, corneal opacities, gum hypertrophy, and EKG changes have been reported (summary by Zankl et al., 2007). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
98152
Concept ID:
C0432289
Congenital Abnormality
14.

Migraine

Migraine is the most common type of chronic, episodic headache, as summarized by Featherstone (1985). One locus for migraine with or without aura (MGR1) has been identified on chromosome 4q24. Other loci for migraine have been identified on 6p21.1-p12.2 (MGR3; 607498), 14q21.2-q22.3 (MGR4; 607501), 19p13 (MGR5; 607508), 1q31 (MGR6; 607516), 15q11-q13 (MGR7; 609179), 5q21 (with or without aura, MGR8, 609570; with aura, MGR9, 609670), 17p13 (MGR10; 610208), 18q12 (MGR11; 610209), 10q22-q23 (MGR12; 611706), and the X chromosome (MGR2; 300125). Mutation in the KCNK18 gene (613655) on chromosome 10q25 causes migraine with aura (MGR13; 613656). A subtype of autosomal dominant migraine with aura (MA), familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM; see 141500), is caused by mutation in the CACNA1A gene (601011) on chromosome 19p13 (FHM1; 141500), by mutation in the ATP1A2 gene (182340) on chromosome 1q21 (FHM2; 602481), or by mutation in the SCN1A gene (182389) on chromosome 2q24 (FHM3; 609634). Another locus for FHM has been mapped to chromosome 1q31 (FHM4; see 607516). There is evidence that a polymorphism in the estrogen receptor gene (ESR1; 133430.0005) and a polymorphism in the TNF gene (191160.0004) may confer susceptibility to migraine. A polymorphism in the endothelin receptor type A gene (EDNRA; 131243.0001) may confer resistance to migraine. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
57451
Concept ID:
C0149931
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) comprises two types based on inheritance pattern: Recessive DEB, including severe generalized (RDEB-sev gen; formerly called Hallopeau-Siemens type [RDEB-HS]) and generalized other (RDEB-O; formerly called non-Hallopeau-Siemens type [RDEB-non-HS]). Dominant DEB (DDEB). In RDEB-sev gen, blisters affecting the whole body may be present in the neonatal period. Oral involvement may lead to mouth blistering, fusion of the tongue to the floor of the mouth, and progressive diminution of the size of the oral cavity. Esophageal erosions can lead to webs and strictures that can cause severe dysphagia. Consequently, severe nutritional deficiency and secondary problems are common. Corneal erosions can lead to scarring and loss of vision. Blistering of the hands and feet followed by scarring fuses the digits into "mitten" hands and feet, a hallmark of this disorder. The lifetime risk of aggressive squamous cell carcinoma is higher than 90%. In contrast, the blistering in the less severe forms of RDEB-O may be localized to hands, feet, knees, and elbows with or without involvement of flexural areas and the trunk, and without the severe, mutilating scarring seen in RDEB-sev gen. In DDEB, blistering is often mild and limited to hands, feet, knees, and elbows, but nonetheless heals with scarring. Dystrophic nails, especially toenails, are common and may be the only manifestation of DDEB. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
36311
Concept ID:
C0079474
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, complex disorder associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. COPD is defined by irreversible airflow obstruction due to chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and/or small airways disease. Airflow obstruction is typically determined by reductions in quantitative spirometric indices, including forced expiratory volume at 1 second (FEV1) and the ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FVC) (Silverman et al., 2002; Celedon et al., 2004). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
9818
Concept ID:
C0024117
Disease or Syndrome
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