Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

Meckel syndrome type 2(MKS2)

MedGen UID:
351059
Concept ID:
C1864148
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: MECKEL-GRUBER SYNDROME, TYPE 2; MKS2; MKS2-Related Meckel Syndrome; TMEM216-Related Meckel Syndrome
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
Intellectual Product
Sources: HPO, OMIM, Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in homozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, autosomal recessive disorders manifest in homozygotes (with two copies of the mutant allele) or compound heterozygotes (whereby each copy of a gene has a distinct mutant allele).
Autosomal recessive inheritance (HPO, OMIM, Orphanet)
 
Gene (location): TMEM216 (11q12.2)
OMIM®: 603194

Definition

Meckel syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive lethal condition characterized by an occipital meningoencephalocele, enlarged kidneys with multicystic dysplasia and fibrotic changes in the portal area of the liver and with ductal proliferation, and postaxial polydactyly. For a more complete phenotypic description and information on genetic heterogeneity, see MKS1 (249000). [from OMIM]

Additional description

From GHR
Meckel syndrome is a disorder with severe signs and symptoms that affect many parts of the body. The most common features are enlarged kidneys with numerous fluid-filled cysts; an occipital encephalocele, which is a sac-like protrusion of the brain through an opening at the back of the skull; and the presence of extra fingers and toes (polydactyly). Most affected individuals also have a buildup of scar tissue (fibrosis) in the liver.Other signs and symptoms of Meckel syndrome vary widely among affected individuals. Numerous abnormalities of the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) have been reported in people with Meckel syndrome, including a group of birth defects known as neural tube defects. These defects occur when a structure called the neural tube, a layer of cells that ultimately develops into the brain and spinal cord, fails to close completely during the first few weeks of embryonic development. Meckel syndrome can also cause problems with development of the eyes and other facial features, heart, bones, urinary system, and genitalia.Because of their serious health problems, most individuals with Meckel syndrome die before or shortly after birth. Most often, affected infants die of respiratory problems or kidney failure.  https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/meckel-syndrome

Clinical features

Microphthalmos
MedGen UID:
10033
Concept ID:
C0026010
Congenital Abnormality
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss.People with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision.People with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved.Between one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Polydactyly
MedGen UID:
57774
Concept ID:
C0152427
Congenital Abnormality
A congenital anomaly characterized by the presence of supernumerary fingers or toes.
Postaxial hand polydactyly
MedGen UID:
892379
Concept ID:
C2112130
Finding
Bile duct proliferation
MedGen UID:
504833
Concept ID:
CN001289
Finding
Proliferative changes of the bile ducts.
Dandy-Walker syndrome
MedGen UID:
4150
Concept ID:
C0010964
Disease or Syndrome
Dandy-Walker malformation is defined by hypoplasia and upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis and cystic dilation of the fourth ventricle. Affected individuals often have motor deficits such as delayed motor development, hypotonia, and ataxia; about half have mental retardation and some have hydrocephalus. DWM is a heterogeneous disorder. The low empiric recurrence risk of approximately 1 to 2% for nonsyndromic DWM suggests that mendelian inheritance is unlikely (summary by Murray et al., 1985).
Anencephaly
MedGen UID:
776557
Concept ID:
C2021655
Finding
Meningocele
MedGen UID:
505234
Concept ID:
CN002211
Finding
Protrusion of the meninges through a defect of the vertebral column.
Bile duct proliferation
MedGen UID:
504833
Concept ID:
CN001289
Finding
Proliferative changes of the bile ducts.
Dandy-Walker syndrome
MedGen UID:
4150
Concept ID:
C0010964
Disease or Syndrome
Dandy-Walker malformation is defined by hypoplasia and upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis and cystic dilation of the fourth ventricle. Affected individuals often have motor deficits such as delayed motor development, hypotonia, and ataxia; about half have mental retardation and some have hydrocephalus. DWM is a heterogeneous disorder. The low empiric recurrence risk of approximately 1 to 2% for nonsyndromic DWM suggests that mendelian inheritance is unlikely (summary by Murray et al., 1985).
Polydactyly
MedGen UID:
57774
Concept ID:
C0152427
Congenital Abnormality
A congenital anomaly characterized by the presence of supernumerary fingers or toes.
Postaxial hand polydactyly
MedGen UID:
892379
Concept ID:
C2112130
Finding
Encephalocele
MedGen UID:
505091
Concept ID:
CN001885
Finding
A neural tube defect characterized by sac-like protrusions of the brain and the membranes that cover it through openings in the skull.
Meningocele
MedGen UID:
505234
Concept ID:
CN002211
Finding
Protrusion of the meninges through a defect of the vertebral column.
Cleft palate
MedGen UID:
3107
Concept ID:
C0008925
Congenital Abnormality
Cleft palate is a developmental defect of the palate resulting from a failure of fusion of the palatine processes and manifesting as a separation of the roof of the mouth (soft and hard palate).
Dandy-Walker syndrome
MedGen UID:
4150
Concept ID:
C0010964
Disease or Syndrome
Dandy-Walker malformation is defined by hypoplasia and upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis and cystic dilation of the fourth ventricle. Affected individuals often have motor deficits such as delayed motor development, hypotonia, and ataxia; about half have mental retardation and some have hydrocephalus. DWM is a heterogeneous disorder. The low empiric recurrence risk of approximately 1 to 2% for nonsyndromic DWM suggests that mendelian inheritance is unlikely (summary by Murray et al., 1985).
Microphthalmos
MedGen UID:
10033
Concept ID:
C0026010
Congenital Abnormality
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss.People with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision.People with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved.Between one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Encephalocele
MedGen UID:
505091
Concept ID:
CN001885
Finding
A neural tube defect characterized by sac-like protrusions of the brain and the membranes that cover it through openings in the skull.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Salonen R, Kestilä M, Bergmann C
Eur J Hum Genet 2011 Jul;19(7) Epub 2011 Feb 2 doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2010.255. PMID: 21368913Free PMC Article

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Al-Belushi M, Al Ibrahim A, Ahmed M, Ahmed B, Khenyab N, Konje JC
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2016;29(12):2013-6. Epub 2015 Aug 26 doi: 10.3109/14767058.2015.1072162. PMID: 26333300
Abdelhamed ZA, Natarajan S, Wheway G, Inglehearn CF, Toomes C, Johnson CA, Jagger DJ
Dis Model Mech 2015 Jun;8(6):527-41. Epub 2015 Apr 7 doi: 10.1242/dmm.019083. PMID: 26035863Free PMC Article
Seidahmed MZ, Abdelbasit OB, Shaheed MM, Alhussein KA, Miqdad AM, Samadi AS, Khalil MI, Al-Mardawi E, Salih MA
Saudi Med J 2014 Dec;35 Suppl 1:S49-56. PMID: 25551112Free PMC Article
Travaglini L, Brancati F, Silhavy J, Iannicelli M, Nickerson E, Elkhartoufi N, Scott E, Spencer E, Gabriel S, Thomas S, Ben-Zeev B, Bertini E, Boltshauser E, Chaouch M, Cilio MR, de Jong MM, Kayserili H, Ogur G, Poretti A, Signorini S, Uziel G, Zaki MS; International JSRD Study Group., Johnson C, Attié-Bitach T, Gleeson JG, Valente EM
Eur J Hum Genet 2013 Oct;21(10):1074-8. Epub 2013 Feb 6 doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2012.305. PMID: 23386033Free PMC Article
Mason SB, Lai X, Ringham HN, Bacallao RL, Harris PC, Witzmann FA, Gattone VH 2nd
Nephron Exp Nephrol 2011;117(2):e31-8. Epub 2010 Aug 6 doi: 10.1159/000319722. PMID: 20693816Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Al-Belushi M, Al Ibrahim A, Ahmed M, Ahmed B, Khenyab N, Konje JC
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2016;29(12):2013-6. Epub 2015 Aug 26 doi: 10.3109/14767058.2015.1072162. PMID: 26333300
Aslan K, Külahçı Aslan E, Orhan A, Atalay MA
Organogenesis 2015;11(2):87-92. Epub 2015 Jun 2 doi: 10.1080/15476278.2015.1055431. PMID: 26037304Free PMC Article
Barisic I, Boban L, Loane M, Garne E, Wellesley D, Calzolari E, Dolk H, Addor MC, Bergman JE, Braz P, Draper ES, Haeusler M, Khoshnood B, Klungsoyr K, Pierini A, Queisser-Luft A, Rankin J, Rissmann A, Verellen-Dumoulin C
Eur J Hum Genet 2015 Jun;23(6):746-52. Epub 2014 Sep 3 doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2014.174. PMID: 25182137Free PMC Article
Seidahmed MZ, Abdelbasit OB, Shaheed MM, Alhussein KA, Miqdad AM, Samadi AS, Khalil MI, Al-Mardawi E, Salih MA
Saudi Med J 2014 Dec;35 Suppl 1:S49-56. PMID: 25551112Free PMC Article
Travaglini L, Brancati F, Silhavy J, Iannicelli M, Nickerson E, Elkhartoufi N, Scott E, Spencer E, Gabriel S, Thomas S, Ben-Zeev B, Bertini E, Boltshauser E, Chaouch M, Cilio MR, de Jong MM, Kayserili H, Ogur G, Poretti A, Signorini S, Uziel G, Zaki MS; International JSRD Study Group., Johnson C, Attié-Bitach T, Gleeson JG, Valente EM
Eur J Hum Genet 2013 Oct;21(10):1074-8. Epub 2013 Feb 6 doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2012.305. PMID: 23386033Free PMC Article

Prognosis

Al-Belushi M, Al Ibrahim A, Ahmed M, Ahmed B, Khenyab N, Konje JC
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2016;29(12):2013-6. Epub 2015 Aug 26 doi: 10.3109/14767058.2015.1072162. PMID: 26333300
Aslan K, Külahçı Aslan E, Orhan A, Atalay MA
Organogenesis 2015;11(2):87-92. Epub 2015 Jun 2 doi: 10.1080/15476278.2015.1055431. PMID: 26037304Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Aslan K, Külahçı Aslan E, Orhan A, Atalay MA
Organogenesis 2015;11(2):87-92. Epub 2015 Jun 2 doi: 10.1080/15476278.2015.1055431. PMID: 26037304Free PMC Article
Barisic I, Boban L, Loane M, Garne E, Wellesley D, Calzolari E, Dolk H, Addor MC, Bergman JE, Braz P, Draper ES, Haeusler M, Khoshnood B, Klungsoyr K, Pierini A, Queisser-Luft A, Rankin J, Rissmann A, Verellen-Dumoulin C
Eur J Hum Genet 2015 Jun;23(6):746-52. Epub 2014 Sep 3 doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2014.174. PMID: 25182137Free PMC Article
Travaglini L, Brancati F, Silhavy J, Iannicelli M, Nickerson E, Elkhartoufi N, Scott E, Spencer E, Gabriel S, Thomas S, Ben-Zeev B, Bertini E, Boltshauser E, Chaouch M, Cilio MR, de Jong MM, Kayserili H, Ogur G, Poretti A, Signorini S, Uziel G, Zaki MS; International JSRD Study Group., Johnson C, Attié-Bitach T, Gleeson JG, Valente EM
Eur J Hum Genet 2013 Oct;21(10):1074-8. Epub 2013 Feb 6 doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2012.305. PMID: 23386033Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center