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Noonan syndrome 3(NS3)

MedGen UID:
349931
Concept ID:
C1860991
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: KRAS gene related Noonan syndrome; KRAS-Related Noonan Syndrome; NS3
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal dominant inheritance
MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Intellectual Product
Sources: HPO, OMIM
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in heterozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, an autosomal dominant disorder is caused when a single copy of the mutant allele is present. Males and females are affected equally, and can both transmit the disorder with a risk of 50% for each child of inheriting the mutant allele.
 
Gene (location): KRAS (12p12.1)
 
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0012371
OMIM®: 609942

Disease characteristics

Excerpted from the GeneReview: Noonan Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population. [from GeneReviews]
Authors:
Judith E Allanson  |  Amy E Roberts   view full author information

Additional descriptions

From OMIM
Noonan syndrome is an autosomal dominant dysmorphic syndrome characterized primarily by dysmorphic facial features, cardiac abnormalities, and short stature (summary by Shah et al., 1999). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Noonan syndrome, see NS1 (163950).  http://www.omim.org/entry/609942
From MedlinePlus Genetics
Noonan syndrome is one of a group of related conditions, collectively known as RASopathies. These conditions all have similar signs and symptoms and are caused by changes in the same cell signaling pathway. In addition to Noonan syndrome, the RASopathies include cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome, Costello syndrome, neurofibromatosis type 1, Legius syndrome, and Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines.\n\nSome people with Noonan syndrome develop cancer, particularly those involving the blood-forming cells (leukemia). It has been estimated that children with Noonan syndrome have an eightfold increased risk of developing leukemia or other cancers over age-matched peers.\n\nNoonan syndrome can cause a variety of other signs and symptoms. Most children diagnosed with Noonan syndrome have normal intelligence, but a few have special educational needs, and some have intellectual disability. Some affected individuals have vision or hearing problems. Affected infants may have feeding problems, which typically get better by age 1 or 2 years. Infants with Noonan syndrome may be born with puffy hands and feet caused by a buildup of fluid (lymphedema), which can go away on its own. Older individuals can also develop lymphedema, usually in the ankles and lower legs.\n\nAdolescent males with Noonan syndrome typically experience delayed puberty. They go through puberty starting at age 13 or 14 and have a reduced pubertal growth spurt that results in shortened stature. Most males with Noonan syndrome have undescended testes (cryptorchidism), which may contribute to infertility (inability to father a child) later in life. Females with Noonan syndrome can experience delayed puberty but most have normal puberty and fertility.\n\nA variety of bleeding disorders have been associated with Noonan syndrome. Some affected individuals have excessive bruising, nosebleeds, or prolonged bleeding following injury or surgery. Rarely, women with Noonan syndrome who have a bleeding disorder have excessive bleeding during menstruation (menorrhagia) or childbirth.\n\nMost people with Noonan syndrome have some form of critical congenital heart disease. The most common heart defect in these individuals is a narrowing of the valve that controls blood flow from the heart to the lungs (pulmonary valve stenosis). Some have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which enlarges and weakens the heart muscle.\n\nIndividuals with Noonan syndrome often have either a sunken chest (pectus excavatum) or a protruding chest (pectus carinatum). Some affected people may also have an abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis).\n\nBetween 50 and 70 percent of individuals with Noonan syndrome have short stature. At birth, they are usually a normal length and weight, but growth slows over time. Abnormal levels of growth hormone, a protein that is necessary for the normal growth of the body's bones and tissues, may contribute to the slow growth.\n\nPeople with Noonan syndrome have distinctive facial features such as a deep groove in the area between the nose and mouth (philtrum), widely spaced eyes that are usually pale blue or blue-green in color, and low-set ears that are rotated backward. Affected individuals may have a high arch in the roof of the mouth (high-arched palate), poor teeth alignment, and a small lower jaw (micrognathia). Many children with Noonan syndrome have a short neck, and both children and adults may have excess neck skin (also called webbing) and a low hairline at the back of the neck.\n\nNoonan syndrome is a condition that affects many areas of the body. It is characterized by mildly unusual facial features, short stature, heart defects, bleeding problems, skeletal malformations, and many other signs and symptoms.  https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/noonan-syndrome
From MedlinePlus Genetics
Some people with Noonan syndrome develop cancer, particularly those involving the blood-forming cells (leukemia). It has been estimated that children with Noonan syndrome have an eightfold increased risk of developing leukemia or other cancers over age-matched peers.\n\nNoonan syndrome is one of a group of related conditions, collectively known as RASopathies. These conditions all have similar signs and symptoms and are caused by changes in the same cell signaling pathway. In addition to Noonan syndrome, the RASopathies include cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome, Costello syndrome, neurofibromatosis type 1, Legius syndrome, and Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines.\n\nNoonan syndrome can cause a variety of other signs and symptoms. Most children diagnosed with Noonan syndrome have normal intelligence, but a few have special educational needs, and some have intellectual disability. Some affected individuals have vision or hearing problems. Affected infants may have feeding problems, which typically get better by age 1 or 2 years. Infants with Noonan syndrome may be born with puffy hands and feet caused by a buildup of fluid (lymphedema), which can go away on its own. Older individuals can also develop lymphedema, usually in the ankles and lower legs.\n\nAdolescent males with Noonan syndrome typically experience delayed puberty. They go through puberty starting at age 13 or 14 and have a reduced pubertal growth spurt that results in shortened stature. Most males with Noonan syndrome have undescended testes (cryptorchidism), which may contribute to infertility (inability to father a child) later in life. Females with Noonan syndrome can experience delayed puberty but most have normal puberty and fertility.\n\nA variety of bleeding disorders have been associated with Noonan syndrome. Some affected individuals have excessive bruising, nosebleeds, or prolonged bleeding following injury or surgery. Rarely, women with Noonan syndrome who have a bleeding disorder have excessive bleeding during menstruation (menorrhagia) or childbirth.\n\nMost people with Noonan syndrome have some form of critical congenital heart disease. The most common heart defect in these individuals is a narrowing of the valve that controls blood flow from the heart to the lungs (pulmonary valve stenosis). Some have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which enlarges and weakens the heart muscle.\n\nIndividuals with Noonan syndrome often have either a sunken chest (pectus excavatum) or a protruding chest (pectus carinatum). Some affected people may also have an abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis).\n\nBetween 50 and 70 percent of individuals with Noonan syndrome have short stature. At birth, they are usually a normal length and weight, but growth slows over time. Abnormal levels of growth hormone, a protein that is necessary for the normal growth of the body's bones and tissues, may contribute to the slow growth.\n\nPeople with Noonan syndrome have distinctive facial features such as a deep groove in the area between the nose and mouth (philtrum), widely spaced eyes that are usually pale blue or blue-green in color, and low-set ears that are rotated backward. Affected individuals may have a high arch in the roof of the mouth (high-arched palate), poor teeth alignment, and a small lower jaw (micrognathia). Many children with Noonan syndrome have a short neck, and both children and adults may have excess neck skin (also called webbing) and a low hairline at the back of the neck.\n\nNoonan syndrome is a condition that affects many areas of the body. It is characterized by mildly unusual facial features, short stature, heart defects, bleeding problems, skeletal malformations, and many other signs and symptoms.  https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/noonan-syndrome

Clinical features

From HPO
Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia
MedGen UID:
138109
Concept ID:
C0349639
Neoplastic Process
Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is an aggressive pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative disorder (MPD) characterized by malignant transformation in the hematopoietic stem cell compartment with proliferation of differentiated progeny (Loh et al., 2009). JMML constitutes approximately 30% of childhood cases of myelodysplastic syndrome and 2% of leukemia (Hasle et al., 1999). Although JMML is a progressive and often rapidly fatal disease without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), some patients have been shown to have a prolonged and stable clinical course without HSCT (Niemeyer et al., 1997). Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a similar disorder with later onset. Both JMML and CMML have a high frequency of mutations affecting the RAS signaling pathway and show hypersensitivity to stimulation with GM-CSF, which causes STAT5 (601511) hyperphosphorylation (Loh et al., 2009). Genetic Heterogeneity of Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia In up to 60% of cases of JMML, the RAS/MAPK pathway is deregulated due to somatic mutations in the PTPN11 (176876), KRAS (190070), and NRAS (164790) genes. Additionally, both germline and somatic mutations in the CBL gene have been found in patients with JMML, indicating a frequency of 10 to 15% of JMML patients overall (Loh et al., 2009). Somatic disruptions of the GRAF gene (ARHGAP26; 605370) have also been found in patients with JMML. About 10 to 15% of JMML cases arise in children with neurofibromatosis type I (NF1; 162200) due to germline mutations in the NF1 gene (613113). In addition, patients with Noonan syndrome (NS1, 163950; NS3, 609942) or Noonan syndrome-like disorder (NSLL; 613563) due to germline mutations in the PTPN11, KRAS2, and CBL genes, respectively, also have an increased risk of developing JMML. Genetic Heterogeneity of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Somatic mutations in the CBL, ASXL1 (612990), TET2 (612839), and SF3B1 (605590) genes have been found in patients with CMML.
Cryptorchidism
MedGen UID:
8192
Concept ID:
C0010417
Congenital Abnormality
Cryptorchidism, or failure of testicular descent, is a common human congenital abnormality with a multifactorial etiology that likely reflects the involvement of endocrine, environmental, and hereditary factors. Cryptorchidism can result in infertility and increases risk for testicular tumors. Testicular descent from abdomen to scrotum occurs in 2 distinct phases: the transabdominal phase and the inguinoscrotal phase (summary by Gorlov et al., 2002).
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
MedGen UID:
2881
Concept ID:
C0007194
Disease or Syndrome
A condition in which the myocardium is hypertrophied without an obvious cause. The hypertrophy is generally asymmetric and may be associated with obstruction of the ventricular outflow tract.
Patent ductus arteriosus
MedGen UID:
4415
Concept ID:
C0013274
Congenital Abnormality
In utero, the ductus arteriosus (DA) serves to divert ventricular output away from the lungs and toward the placenta by connecting the main pulmonary artery to the descending aorta. A patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in the first 3 days of life is a physiologic shunt in healthy term and preterm newborn infants, and normally is substantially closed within about 24 hours after bith and completely closed after about three weeks. Failure of physiologcal closure is referred to a persistent or patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Depending on the degree of left-to-right shunting, PDA can have clinical consequences.
Atrial septal defect
MedGen UID:
6753
Concept ID:
C0018817
Congenital Abnormality
Atrial septal defect (ASD) is a congenital abnormality of the interatrial septum that enables blood flow between the left and right atria via the interatrial septum.
Ventricular septal defect
MedGen UID:
42366
Concept ID:
C0018818
Congenital Abnormality
The presence of a defect (opening) in the septum that separates the two ventricles of the heart. It can be congenital or acquired.
Mitral valve prolapse
MedGen UID:
7671
Concept ID:
C0026267
Disease or Syndrome
A fairly common and often benign valvular heart disorder characterized by redundancy or hooding of mitral valve leaflets so that they prolapse into the left atrium, often causing mitral regurgitation. It is often a symptomless condition but may be marked by varied symptoms (e.g. chest pain, fatigue, dizziness, dyspnea, or palpitations) leading in some cases to endocarditis or ventricular tachycardia.
Pulmonic stenosis
MedGen UID:
408291
Concept ID:
C1956257
Disease or Syndrome
Narrowing of the opening between the pulmonary artery and the right ventricle, usually at the level of the valve leaflets.
Atrial septal dilatation
MedGen UID:
1384602
Concept ID:
C4476553
Anatomical Abnormality
A bulging of the interatrial septum towards one side. In adults, atrial septal aneurysm can be defined as a protrusion of the aneurysm of >10 mm beyond the plane of the atrial septum as measured by transesophageal echocardiography.
Short stature
MedGen UID:
87607
Concept ID:
C0349588
Finding
A height below that which is expected according to age and gender norms. Although there is no universally accepted definition of short stature, many refer to "short stature" as height more than 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender (or below the 3rd percentile for age and gender dependent norms).
Low-set ears
MedGen UID:
65980
Concept ID:
C0239234
Congenital Abnormality
Posteriorly rotated ears
MedGen UID:
96566
Concept ID:
C0431478
Congenital Abnormality
Global developmental delay
MedGen UID:
107838
Concept ID:
C0557874
Finding
A delay in the achievement of motor or mental milestones in the domains of development of a child, including motor skills, speech and language, cognitive skills, and social and emotional skills. This term should only be used to describe children younger than five years of age.
Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia
MedGen UID:
138109
Concept ID:
C0349639
Neoplastic Process
Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is an aggressive pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative disorder (MPD) characterized by malignant transformation in the hematopoietic stem cell compartment with proliferation of differentiated progeny (Loh et al., 2009). JMML constitutes approximately 30% of childhood cases of myelodysplastic syndrome and 2% of leukemia (Hasle et al., 1999). Although JMML is a progressive and often rapidly fatal disease without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), some patients have been shown to have a prolonged and stable clinical course without HSCT (Niemeyer et al., 1997). Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a similar disorder with later onset. Both JMML and CMML have a high frequency of mutations affecting the RAS signaling pathway and show hypersensitivity to stimulation with GM-CSF, which causes STAT5 (601511) hyperphosphorylation (Loh et al., 2009). Genetic Heterogeneity of Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia In up to 60% of cases of JMML, the RAS/MAPK pathway is deregulated due to somatic mutations in the PTPN11 (176876), KRAS (190070), and NRAS (164790) genes. Additionally, both germline and somatic mutations in the CBL gene have been found in patients with JMML, indicating a frequency of 10 to 15% of JMML patients overall (Loh et al., 2009). Somatic disruptions of the GRAF gene (ARHGAP26; 605370) have also been found in patients with JMML. About 10 to 15% of JMML cases arise in children with neurofibromatosis type I (NF1; 162200) due to germline mutations in the NF1 gene (613113). In addition, patients with Noonan syndrome (NS1, 163950; NS3, 609942) or Noonan syndrome-like disorder (NSLL; 613563) due to germline mutations in the PTPN11, KRAS2, and CBL genes, respectively, also have an increased risk of developing JMML. Genetic Heterogeneity of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Somatic mutations in the CBL, ASXL1 (612990), TET2 (612839), and SF3B1 (605590) genes have been found in patients with CMML.
Frontal bossing
MedGen UID:
67453
Concept ID:
C0221354
Congenital Abnormality
Bilateral bulging of the lateral frontal bone prominences with relative sparing of the midline.
Dolichocephaly
MedGen UID:
65142
Concept ID:
C0221358
Congenital Abnormality
An abnormality of skull shape characterized by a increased anterior-posterior diameter, i.e., an increased antero-posterior dimension of the skull. Cephalic index less than 76%. Alternatively, an apparently increased antero-posterior length of the head compared to width. Often due to premature closure of the sagittal suture.
Scaphocephaly
MedGen UID:
82712
Concept ID:
C0265534
Congenital Abnormality
Scaphocephaly is a subtype of dolichocephaly where the anterior and posterior aspects of the cranial vault are pointed (boat-shaped). Scaphocephaly is caused by a precocious fusion of sagittal suture without other associated synostosis.
Sagittal craniosynostosis
MedGen UID:
140921
Concept ID:
C0432123
Congenital Abnormality
A kind of craniosynostosis affecting the sagittal suture.
Delayed skeletal maturation
MedGen UID:
108148
Concept ID:
C0541764
Finding
A decreased rate of skeletal maturation. Delayed skeletal maturation can be diagnosed on the basis of an estimation of the bone age from radiographs of specific bones in the human body.
Pectus excavatum
MedGen UID:
781174
Concept ID:
C2051831
Finding
A defect of the chest wall characterized by a depression of the sternum, giving the chest ("pectus") a caved-in ("excavatum") appearance.
Macrocephalus
MedGen UID:
745757
Concept ID:
C2243051
Finding
Occipitofrontal (head) circumference greater than 97th centile compared to appropriate, age matched, sex-matched normal standards. Alternatively, a apparently increased size of the cranium.
Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia
MedGen UID:
138109
Concept ID:
C0349639
Neoplastic Process
Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is an aggressive pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative disorder (MPD) characterized by malignant transformation in the hematopoietic stem cell compartment with proliferation of differentiated progeny (Loh et al., 2009). JMML constitutes approximately 30% of childhood cases of myelodysplastic syndrome and 2% of leukemia (Hasle et al., 1999). Although JMML is a progressive and often rapidly fatal disease without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), some patients have been shown to have a prolonged and stable clinical course without HSCT (Niemeyer et al., 1997). Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a similar disorder with later onset. Both JMML and CMML have a high frequency of mutations affecting the RAS signaling pathway and show hypersensitivity to stimulation with GM-CSF, which causes STAT5 (601511) hyperphosphorylation (Loh et al., 2009). Genetic Heterogeneity of Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia In up to 60% of cases of JMML, the RAS/MAPK pathway is deregulated due to somatic mutations in the PTPN11 (176876), KRAS (190070), and NRAS (164790) genes. Additionally, both germline and somatic mutations in the CBL gene have been found in patients with JMML, indicating a frequency of 10 to 15% of JMML patients overall (Loh et al., 2009). Somatic disruptions of the GRAF gene (ARHGAP26; 605370) have also been found in patients with JMML. About 10 to 15% of JMML cases arise in children with neurofibromatosis type I (NF1; 162200) due to germline mutations in the NF1 gene (613113). In addition, patients with Noonan syndrome (NS1, 163950; NS3, 609942) or Noonan syndrome-like disorder (NSLL; 613563) due to germline mutations in the PTPN11, KRAS2, and CBL genes, respectively, also have an increased risk of developing JMML. Genetic Heterogeneity of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Somatic mutations in the CBL, ASXL1 (612990), TET2 (612839), and SF3B1 (605590) genes have been found in patients with CMML.
Cystic hygroma
MedGen UID:
60195
Concept ID:
C0206620
Neoplastic Process
A benign lymphatic neoplasm usually arising from the neck and characterized by cystic dilation of the lymphatic vessels.
Webbed neck
MedGen UID:
113154
Concept ID:
C0221217
Congenital Abnormality
A congenital, usually bilateral, thick web-like fold of skin that extends from the acromion to the mastoid process. This deformity is associated with Turner Syndrome and Noonan Syndrome.
Frontal bossing
MedGen UID:
67453
Concept ID:
C0221354
Congenital Abnormality
Bilateral bulging of the lateral frontal bone prominences with relative sparing of the midline.
Dolichocephaly
MedGen UID:
65142
Concept ID:
C0221358
Congenital Abnormality
An abnormality of skull shape characterized by a increased anterior-posterior diameter, i.e., an increased antero-posterior dimension of the skull. Cephalic index less than 76%. Alternatively, an apparently increased antero-posterior length of the head compared to width. Often due to premature closure of the sagittal suture.
High palate
MedGen UID:
66814
Concept ID:
C0240635
Congenital Abnormality
Height of the palate more than 2 SD above the mean (objective) or palatal height at the level of the first permanent molar more than twice the height of the teeth (subjective).
Scaphocephaly
MedGen UID:
82712
Concept ID:
C0265534
Congenital Abnormality
Scaphocephaly is a subtype of dolichocephaly where the anterior and posterior aspects of the cranial vault are pointed (boat-shaped). Scaphocephaly is caused by a precocious fusion of sagittal suture without other associated synostosis.
Downslanted palpebral fissures
MedGen UID:
98391
Concept ID:
C0423110
Finding
The palpebral fissure inclination is more than two standard deviations below the mean.
Sagittal craniosynostosis
MedGen UID:
140921
Concept ID:
C0432123
Congenital Abnormality
A kind of craniosynostosis affecting the sagittal suture.
Epicanthus
MedGen UID:
151862
Concept ID:
C0678230
Congenital Abnormality
Epicanthus is a condition in which a fold of skin stretches from the upper to the lower eyelid, partially covering the inner canthus. Usher (1935) noted that epicanthus is a normal finding in the fetus of all races. Epicanthus also occurs in association with hereditary ptosis (110100).
Anteverted nares
MedGen UID:
326648
Concept ID:
C1840077
Finding
Anteriorly-facing nostrils viewed with the head in the Frankfurt horizontal and the eyes of the observer level with the eyes of the subject. This gives the appearance of an upturned nose (upturned nasal tip).
Short nose
MedGen UID:
343052
Concept ID:
C1854114
Finding
Distance from nasion to subnasale more than two standard deviations below the mean, or alternatively, an apparently decreased length from the nasal root to the nasal tip.
Hypoplastic nasal bridge
MedGen UID:
356319
Concept ID:
C1865597
Finding
Macrocephalus
MedGen UID:
745757
Concept ID:
C2243051
Finding
Occipitofrontal (head) circumference greater than 97th centile compared to appropriate, age matched, sex-matched normal standards. Alternatively, a apparently increased size of the cranium.
Polyhydramnios
MedGen UID:
6936
Concept ID:
C0020224
Pathologic Function
The presence of excess amniotic fluid in the uterus during pregnancy.
Hypertelorism
MedGen UID:
9373
Concept ID:
C0020534
Finding
Although hypertelorism means an excessive distance between any paired organs (e.g., the nipples), the use of the word has come to be confined to ocular hypertelorism. Hypertelorism occurs as an isolated feature and is also a feature of many syndromes, e.g., Opitz G syndrome (145410), Greig cephalopolysyndactyly (175700), and Noonan syndrome (163950) (summary by Cohen et al., 1995).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Romano AA, Allanson JE, Dahlgren J, Gelb BD, Hall B, Pierpont ME, Roberts AE, Robinson W, Takemoto CM, Noonan JA
Pediatrics 2010 Oct;126(4):746-59. Epub 2010 Sep 27 doi: 10.1542/peds.2009-3207. PMID: 20876176

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Tiemens DK, Nugteren J, Leenders E, Wingbermühle E, Pittens CACM, Draaisma JMT
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2021 Oct 26;16(1):449. doi: 10.1186/s13023-021-02083-x. PMID: 34702330Free PMC Article
Zhao X, Li Z, Wang L, Lan Z, Lin F, Zhang W, Su Z
BMC Endocr Disord 2021 Jan 6;21(1):2. doi: 10.1186/s12902-020-00666-6. PMID: 33407364Free PMC Article
Horikawa R, Ogata T, Matsubara Y, Yokoya S, Ogawa Y, Nishijima K, Endo T, Ozono K
Endocr J 2020 Aug 28;67(8):803-818. Epub 2020 May 9 doi: 10.1507/endocrj.EJ19-0371. PMID: 32269181
van Trier DC, van der Burgt I, Draaijer RW, Cruysberg JRM, Noordam C, Draaisma JM
Eur J Pediatr 2018 Aug;177(8):1293-1298. Epub 2018 Jun 9 doi: 10.1007/s00431-018-3183-1. PMID: 29948256Free PMC Article
Colquitt JL, Noonan JA
Congenit Heart Dis 2014 Mar-Apr;9(2):144-50. Epub 2013 Jun 10 doi: 10.1111/chd.12102. PMID: 23750712

Diagnosis

Li M, Zhang J, Sun N
J Int Med Res 2020 Aug;48(8):300060520936445. doi: 10.1177/0300060520936445. PMID: 32867556Free PMC Article
Zhou P, Zhu L, Fan Q, Liu Y, Zhang T, Yang T, Chen J, Cheng Q, Li T, Chen L
Am J Med Genet A 2020 Aug;182(8):1967-1971. Epub 2020 Jun 1 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.61638. PMID: 32476286
Hemmati P, Dearani JA, Daly RC, King KS, Ammash NM, Cetta F, Schaff HV
Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2019 Autumn;31(3):507-513. Epub 2018 Dec 18 doi: 10.1053/j.semtcvs.2018.12.004. PMID: 30576779
van Trier DC, van der Burgt I, Draaijer RW, Cruysberg JRM, Noordam C, Draaisma JM
Eur J Pediatr 2018 Aug;177(8):1293-1298. Epub 2018 Jun 9 doi: 10.1007/s00431-018-3183-1. PMID: 29948256Free PMC Article
Colquitt JL, Noonan JA
Congenit Heart Dis 2014 Mar-Apr;9(2):144-50. Epub 2013 Jun 10 doi: 10.1111/chd.12102. PMID: 23750712

Therapy

Shangguan H, Xu Y, Chen R
Zhejiang Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban 2021 Aug 25;50(4):500-505. doi: 10.3724/zdxbyxb-2021-0263. PMID: 34704406
Zhou P, Zhu L, Fan Q, Liu Y, Zhang T, Yang T, Chen J, Cheng Q, Li T, Chen L
Am J Med Genet A 2020 Aug;182(8):1967-1971. Epub 2020 Jun 1 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.61638. PMID: 32476286
Horikawa R, Ogata T, Matsubara Y, Yokoya S, Ogawa Y, Nishijima K, Endo T, Ozono K
Endocr J 2020 Aug 28;67(8):803-818. Epub 2020 May 9 doi: 10.1507/endocrj.EJ19-0371. PMID: 32269181
Hemmati P, Dearani JA, Daly RC, King KS, Ammash NM, Cetta F, Schaff HV
Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2019 Autumn;31(3):507-513. Epub 2018 Dec 18 doi: 10.1053/j.semtcvs.2018.12.004. PMID: 30576779
Noonan JA, Kappelgaard AM
Horm Res Paediatr 2015;83(3):157-66. Epub 2014 Dec 10 doi: 10.1159/000369012. PMID: 25503994

Prognosis

Zhao X, Li Z, Wang L, Lan Z, Lin F, Zhang W, Su Z
BMC Endocr Disord 2021 Jan 6;21(1):2. doi: 10.1186/s12902-020-00666-6. PMID: 33407364Free PMC Article
Horikawa R, Ogata T, Matsubara Y, Yokoya S, Ogawa Y, Nishijima K, Endo T, Ozono K
Endocr J 2020 Aug 28;67(8):803-818. Epub 2020 May 9 doi: 10.1507/endocrj.EJ19-0371. PMID: 32269181
Sewduth RN, Pandolfi S, Steklov M, Sheryazdanova A, Zhao P, Criem N, Baietti MF, Lechat B, Quarck R, Impens F, Sablina AA
Circ Res 2020 May 8;126(10):1379-1393. Epub 2020 Mar 16 doi: 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.119.315730. PMID: 32175818Free PMC Article
Noonan JA, Kappelgaard AM
Horm Res Paediatr 2015;83(3):157-66. Epub 2014 Dec 10 doi: 10.1159/000369012. PMID: 25503994
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