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Warburg micro syndrome 1(WARBM1)

MedGen UID:
333142
Concept ID:
C1838625
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Microcephaly, microcornea, congenital cataract, mental retardation, optic atrophy and hypogenitalism; WARBM1
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
Intellectual Product
Sources: HPO, OMIM, Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in individuals with two pathogenic alleles, either homozygotes (two copies of the same mutant allele) or compound heterozygotes (whereby each copy of a gene has a distinct mutant allele).
Autosomal recessive inheritance (HPO, OMIM, Orphanet)
SNOMED CT: Warburg micro syndrome (772224009); Micro syndrome (772224009)
 
Gene (location): RAB3GAP1 (2q21.3)
OMIM®: 600118

Disease characteristics

Excerpted from the GeneReview: RAB18 Deficiency
RAB18 deficiency is the molecular deficit underlying both Warburg micro syndrome (characterized by eye, nervous system, and endocrine abnormalities) and Martsolf syndrome (characterized by similar – but milder – findings). To date Warburg micro syndrome comprises >96% of reported individuals with genetically defined RAB18 deficiency. The hallmark ophthalmologic findings are bilateral congenital cataracts, usually accompanied by microphthalmia, microcornea (diameter <10), and small atonic pupils. Poor vision despite early cataract surgery likely results from progressive optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment. Individuals with Warburg micro syndrome have severe to profound intellectual disability (ID); those with Martsolf syndrome have mild to moderate ID. Some individuals with RAB18 deficiency also have epilepsy. In Warburg micro syndrome, a progressive ascending spastic paraplegia typically begins with spastic diplegia and contractures during the first year, followed by upper-limb involvement leading to spastic quadriplegia after about age five years, often eventually causing breathing difficulties. In Martsolf syndrome infantile hypotonia is followed primarily by slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity. Hypogonadism – when present – manifests in both syndromes, in males as micropenis and/or cryptorchidism and in females as hypoplastic labia minora, clitoral hypoplasia, and small introitus. [from GeneReviews]
Authors:
Mark Handley  |  Eamonn Sheridan   view full author information

Clinical features

From HPO
Cryptorchidism
MedGen UID:
8192
Concept ID:
C0010417
Congenital Abnormality
Cryptorchidism, or failure of testicular descent, is a common human congenital abnormality with a multifactorial etiology that likely reflects the involvement of endocrine, environmental, and hereditary factors. Cryptorchidism can result in infertility and increases risk for testicular tumors. Testicular descent from abdomen to scrotum occurs in 2 distinct phases: the transabdominal phase and the inguinoscrotal phase (summary by Gorlov et al., 2002).
External genital hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
344478
Concept ID:
C1855333
Finding
Underdevelopment of part or all of the external reproductive organs.
Short stature
MedGen UID:
87607
Concept ID:
C0349588
Finding
A height below that which is expected according to age and gender norms. Although there is no universally accepted definition of short stature, many refer to "short stature" as height more than 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender (or below the 3rd percentile for age and gender dependent norms).
Failure to thrive
MedGen UID:
746019
Concept ID:
C2315100
Disease or Syndrome
Failure to thrive (FTT) refers to a child whose physical growth is substantially below the norm.
Macrotia
MedGen UID:
488785
Concept ID:
C0152421
Congenital Abnormality
Median longitudinal ear length greater than two standard deviations above the mean and median ear width greater than two standard deviations above the mean (objective); or, apparent increase in length and width of the pinna (subjective).
Spastic diplegia
MedGen UID:
44181
Concept ID:
C0023882
Disease or Syndrome
A type of cerebral palsy characterized by spasticity and hypertonia of the lower extremities bilaterally, particularly the legs, hips, and pelvis; this is the most common (70%) form of cerebral palsy.
Hyperreflexia
MedGen UID:
57738
Concept ID:
C0151889
Finding
Autonomic nervous system overreaction to stimuli, most commonly after spinal cord injury at a T-5 level and above.
Corpus callosum agenesis
MedGen UID:
104498
Concept ID:
C0175754
Congenital Abnormality
The corpus callosum is the largest fiber tract in the central nervous system and the major interhemispheric fiber bundle in the brain. Formation of the corpus callosum begins as early as 6 weeks' gestation, with the first fibers crossing the midline at 11 to 12 weeks' gestation, and completion of the basic shape by age 18 to 20 weeks (Schell-Apacik et al., 2008). Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) is one of the most frequent malformations in brain with a reported incidence ranging between 0.5 and 70 in 10,000 births. ACC is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition, which can be observed either as an isolated condition or as a manifestation in the context of a congenital syndrome (see MOLECULAR GENETICS and Dobyns, 1996). Also see mirror movements-1 and/or agenesis of the corpus callosum (MRMV1; 157600). Schell-Apacik et al. (2008) noted that there is confusion in the literature regarding radiologic terminology concerning partial absence of the corpus callosum, where various designations have been used, including hypogenesis, hypoplasia, partial agenesis, or dysgenesis.
Cerebral atrophy
MedGen UID:
116012
Concept ID:
C0235946
Disease or Syndrome
Atrophy (wasting, decrease in size of cells or tissue) affecting the cerebrum.
Congenital cerebellar hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
120578
Concept ID:
C0266470
Congenital Abnormality
Hypoplasia of the cerebellum that is associated with inherited metabolic disorders and neurodegenerative disorders. Signs and symptoms include mental and developmental delays, walking and balance difficulties, floppy muscle tone, and seizures.
Hypoplasia of the corpus callosum
MedGen UID:
138005
Concept ID:
C0344482
Congenital Abnormality
Intellectual disability
MedGen UID:
334384
Concept ID:
C1843367
Finding
Microcephaly
MedGen UID:
1644158
Concept ID:
C4551563
Finding
Head circumference below 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender.
Overlapping toe
MedGen UID:
182531
Concept ID:
C0920299
Anatomical Abnormality
Describes a foot digit resting on the dorsal surface of an adjacent digit when the foot is at rest.
Spastic diplegia
MedGen UID:
44181
Concept ID:
C0023882
Disease or Syndrome
A type of cerebral palsy characterized by spasticity and hypertonia of the lower extremities bilaterally, particularly the legs, hips, and pelvis; this is the most common (70%) form of cerebral palsy.
Muscular hypotonia
MedGen UID:
10133
Concept ID:
C0026827
Finding
A condition of decreased tone of the skeletal muscles and diminished resistance to passive stretching.
Generalized hypotonia
MedGen UID:
346841
Concept ID:
C1858120
Finding
Generalized muscular hypotonia (abnormally low muscle tone).
Micrognathia
MedGen UID:
44428
Concept ID:
C0025990
Congenital Abnormality
A congenital abnormality of the jaws (particularly the mandible) in which they are unusually small. This condition is not always pathological and may correct itself as the patient matures; however, it may also present as a birth defect in multiple syndromes.
Kyphoscoliosis
MedGen UID:
154361
Concept ID:
C0575158
Anatomical Abnormality
An abnormal curvature of the spine in both a coronal (lateral) and sagittal (back-to-front) plane.
Overlapping toe
MedGen UID:
182531
Concept ID:
C0920299
Anatomical Abnormality
Describes a foot digit resting on the dorsal surface of an adjacent digit when the foot is at rest.
Joint hypermobility
MedGen UID:
336793
Concept ID:
C1844820
Finding
Osteoporosis
MedGen UID:
776590
Concept ID:
C2911643
Finding
Microcephaly
MedGen UID:
1644158
Concept ID:
C4551563
Finding
Head circumference below 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender.
Micrognathia
MedGen UID:
44428
Concept ID:
C0025990
Congenital Abnormality
A congenital abnormality of the jaws (particularly the mandible) in which they are unusually small. This condition is not always pathological and may correct itself as the patient matures; however, it may also present as a birth defect in multiple syndromes.
Microcephaly
MedGen UID:
1644158
Concept ID:
C4551563
Finding
Head circumference below 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender.
Facial hypertrichosis
MedGen UID:
342000
Concept ID:
C1851400
Finding
Ptosis
MedGen UID:
2287
Concept ID:
C0005745
Disease or Syndrome
Drooping of the upper lid due to deficient development or paralysis of the levator palpebrae muscle.
Congenital cataract
MedGen UID:
3202
Concept ID:
C0009691
Congenital Abnormality
A cataract that occurs congenitally as the result of a developmental defect, in contrast to the majority of cataracts that occur in adulthood as the result of degenerative changes of the lens.
Microphthalmia
MedGen UID:
10033
Concept ID:
C0026010
Congenital Abnormality
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss.People with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision.People with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved.Between one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
18180
Concept ID:
C0029124
Disease or Syndrome
A disorder characterized by loss of optic nerve fibers. It may be inherited or acquired. Acquired causes include ischemia, optic nerve neuropathy, glaucoma, trauma, radiation, brain tumors, and multiple sclerosis. It leads to vision disturbances.
Microcornea
MedGen UID:
78610
Concept ID:
C0266544
Congenital Abnormality
A congenital abnormality characterized by an abnormally small cornea. The horizontal corneal diameter is less than 10mm or less than 9mm in newborns. It is associated with an increased risk of glaucoma.
Deeply set eye
MedGen UID:
473112
Concept ID:
C0423224
Finding
An eye that is more deeply recessed into the plane of the face than is typical.

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
Follow this link to review classifications for Warburg micro syndrome 1 in Orphanet.

Recent clinical studies

Diagnosis

Tasdemir S, Sahin I, Morris-Rosendahl DJ, Marzioglu E, Cayir A, Yuce I, Tatar A
Genet Couns 2015;26(4):415-23. PMID: 26852512
Wiedmer M, Oevermann A, Borer-Germann SE, Gorgas D, Shelton GD, Drögemüller M, Jagannathan V, Henke D, Leeb T
G3 (Bethesda) 2015 Nov 23;6(2):255-62. doi: 10.1534/g3.115.022707. PMID: 26596647Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Wiedmer M, Oevermann A, Borer-Germann SE, Gorgas D, Shelton GD, Drögemüller M, Jagannathan V, Henke D, Leeb T
G3 (Bethesda) 2015 Nov 23;6(2):255-62. doi: 10.1534/g3.115.022707. PMID: 26596647Free PMC Article

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