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Acrocallosal syndrome, Schinzel type(ACLS)

MedGen UID:
162915
Concept ID:
C0796147
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Absence of corpus callosum with unusual facial appearance, mental deficiency, duplication of the halluces and polydactyly; ACLS; HALLUX DUPLICATION, POSTAXIAL POLYDACTYLY, AND ABSENCE OF CORPUS CALLOSUM; KIF7-Related Joubert Syndrome; Schinzel syndrome 1
Modes of inheritance:
Heterogeneous
MedGen UID:
67020
Concept ID:
C0242960
Organism Attribute
Source: HPO
The presence of apparently similar characters for which the genetic evidence indicates that different genes or different genetic mechanisms are involved in different pedigrees. In clinical settings genetic heterogeneity refers to the presence of a variety of genetic defects which cause the same disease, often due to mutations at different loci on the same gene, a finding common to many human diseases including ALZHEIMER DISEASE; CYSTIC FIBROSIS; LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE DEFICIENCY, FAMILIAL; and POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASES. (Rieger, et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed; Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Autosomal recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
Intellectual Product
Sources: HPO, OMIM, Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in homozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, autosomal recessive disorders manifest in homozygotes (with two copies of the mutant allele) or compound heterozygotes (whereby each copy of a gene has a distinct mutant allele).
Autosomal dominant inheritance
MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Intellectual Product
Sources: HPO, OMIM, Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in heterozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, an autosomal dominant disorder is caused when a single copy of the mutant allele is present. Males and females are affected equally, and can both transmit the disorder with a risk of 50% for each child of inheriting the mutant allele.
Autosomal recessive inheritance (HPO, OMIM, Orphanet)
Autosomal dominant inheritance (HPO, OMIM, Orphanet)
SNOMED CT: Acrocallosal syndrome (715951007)
 
Gene (location): KIF7 (15q26.1)
OMIM®: 200990
Orphanet: ORPHA36

Definition

Classic Joubert syndrome (JS) is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS). Hypotonia. Developmental delays. Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. Additional findings can include retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen. [from GTR]

Additional descriptions

From GeneReviews
Classic Joubert syndrome (JS) is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS). Hypotonia. Developmental delays. Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. Additional findings can include retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1325
From OMIM
The acrocallosal syndrome is an autosomal recessive mental retardation syndrome with brain abnormalities such as corpus callosum agenesis and/or Dandy-Walker malformation as well as dysmorphic features, postaxial polydactyly of the hands, and preaxial polydactyly of the feet (Schinzel and Schmid, 1980). It is considered a ciliopathy (Putoux et al., 2011). Joubert syndrome-12 is a disorder with an overlapping phenotype characterized by the hallmark finding of the molar tooth sign (MTS) on brain MRI. For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Joubert syndrome, see 213300. Hydrolethalus-2 (HLS2; 614120) is an allelic disorder with a more severe phenotype and death in utero.  http://www.omim.org/entry/200990
From GHR
Acrocallosal syndrome is a rare condition characterized by a brain abnormality called agenesis of the corpus callosum, the presence of extra fingers and toes (polydactyly), and distinctive facial features. The signs and symptoms of this disorder are present at birth, and their severity varies widely among affected individuals.Agenesis of the corpus callosum occurs when the tissue that connects the left and right halves of the brain (the corpus callosum) fails to form normally during the early stages of development before birth. Other brain abnormalities, including the growth of large cysts in brain tissue, have also been reported in people with acrocallosal syndrome. The changes in brain structure associated with this condition lead to delayed development and intellectual disability, which is most often moderate to severe. Some affected individuals also experience seizures.Extra fingers and toes are common in people with acrocallosal syndrome. The extra digits can be on the same side of the hand or foot as the pinky or little toe (postaxial polydactyly) or on the same side as the thumb or great toe (preaxial polydactyly). Some affected individuals also have webbed or fused skin between the fingers or toes (syndactyly).Distinctive facial features that can occur with acrocallosal syndrome include widely spaced eyes (hypertelorism) and a high, prominent forehead. Many affected individuals also have an unusually large head size (macrocephaly).  https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/acrocallosal-syndrome

Clinical features

Hypertelorism
MedGen UID:
9373
Concept ID:
C0020534
Finding
Although hypertelorism means an excessive distance between any paired organs (e.g., the nipples), the use of the word has come to be confined to ocular hypertelorism. Hypertelorism occurs as an isolated feature and is also a feature of many syndromes, e.g., Opitz G syndrome (145410), Greig cephalopolysyndactyly (175700), and Noonan syndrome (163950) (summary by Cohen et al., 1995).
Nystagmus
MedGen UID:
45166
Concept ID:
C0028738
Disease or Syndrome
Involuntary movements of the eye that are divided into two types, jerk and pendular. Jerk nystagmus has a slow phase in one direction followed by a corrective fast phase in the opposite direction, and is usually caused by central or peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Pendular nystagmus features oscillations that are of equal velocity in both directions and this condition is often associated with visual loss early in life. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p272)
Optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
18180
Concept ID:
C0029124
Disease or Syndrome
A disorder characterized by loss of optic nerve fibers. It may be inherited or acquired. Acquired causes include ischemia, optic nerve neuropathy, glaucoma, trauma, radiation, brain tumors, and multiple sclerosis. It leads to vision disturbances.
Strabismus
MedGen UID:
21337
Concept ID:
C0038379
Disease or Syndrome
Misalignment of the visual axes of the eyes. In comitant strabismus the degree of ocular misalignment does not vary with the direction of gaze. In noncomitant strabismus the degree of misalignment varies depending on direction of gaze or which eye is fixating on the target. (Miller, Walsh & Hoyt's Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p641)
Hypopigmentation of the fundus
MedGen UID:
101805
Concept ID:
C0151891
Disease or Syndrome
Decreased amount of pigmentation of the retina.
Cryptorchidism, unilateral or bilateral
MedGen UID:
8192
Concept ID:
C0010417
Congenital Abnormality
Cryptorchidism, or failure of testicular descent, is a common human congenital abnormality with a multifactorial etiology that likely reflects the involvement of endocrine, environmental, and hereditary factors. Cryptorchidism can result in infertility and increases risk for testicular tumors. Testicular descent from abdomen to scrotum occurs in 2 distinct phases: the transabdominal phase and the inguinoscrotal phase (summary by Gorlov et al., 2002).
Rectovaginal fistula
MedGen UID:
11152
Concept ID:
C0034895
Finding
An abnormal anatomical passage between the RECTUM and the VAGINA.
Micropenis
MedGen UID:
78603
Concept ID:
C0266435
Congenital Abnormality
Abnormally small penis. At birth, the normal penis is about 3 cm (stretched length from pubic tubercle to tip of penis) with micropenis less than 2.0-2.5 cm.
Hypospadias
MedGen UID:
305577
Concept ID:
C1691215
Congenital Abnormality
Displacement of the urethral opening on the ventral (inferior) surface of the penis.
Finger syndactyly
MedGen UID:
65139
Concept ID:
C0221352
Congenital Abnormality
Webbing or fusion of the fingers, involving soft parts only or including bone structure. Bony fusions are revered to as \
Brachydactyly
MedGen UID:
67454
Concept ID:
C0221357
Congenital Abnormality
Congenital anomaly of abnormally short fingers or toes.
Toe syndactyly
MedGen UID:
75581
Concept ID:
C0265660
Congenital Abnormality
Webbing or fusion of the toes, involving soft parts only or including bone structure. Bony fusions are revered to as \
Tapered finger
MedGen UID:
98098
Concept ID:
C0426886
Finding
The gradual reduction in girth of the digit from proximal to distal.
Preaxial hand polydactyly
MedGen UID:
237235
Concept ID:
C1395852
Congenital Abnormality
Supernumerary digits located at the radial side of the hand. Polydactyly (supernumerary digits) involving the thumb occurs in many distinct forms of high variability and severity. Ranging from fleshy nubbins over varying degrees of partial duplication/splitting to completely duplicated or even triplicated thumbs or preaxial (on the radial side of the hand) supernumerary digits.
Clinodactyly of the 5th finger
MedGen UID:
340456
Concept ID:
C1850049
Congenital Abnormality
Clinodactyly refers to a bending or curvature of the fifth finger in the radial direction (i.e., towards the 4th finger).
Bifid thumb distal phalanx
MedGen UID:
348557
Concept ID:
C1860162
Finding
Partial duplication of the distal phalanx of the thumb. Depending on the severity, the appearance on x-ray can vary from a notched phalanx (the duplicated bone is almost completely fused with the phalanx) to a partially fused appearance of the two bones.
Duplication of phalanx of hallux
MedGen UID:
395424
Concept ID:
C1860164
Finding
Partial or complete duplication of one or more phalanx of big toe.
Postaxial foot polydactyly
MedGen UID:
384489
Concept ID:
C2112129
Finding
Polydactyly of the foot most commonly refers to the presence of six toes on one foot. Postaxial polydactyly affects the lateral ray and the duplication may range from a well-formed articulated digit to a rudimentary digit.
Postaxial hand polydactyly
MedGen UID:
892379
Concept ID:
C2112130
Supernumerary digits located at the ulnar side of the hand (that is, on the side with the fifth finger).
Preaxial foot polydactyly
MedGen UID:
389171
Concept ID:
C2112942
Finding
Duplication of all or part of the first ray.
Duplication of thumb phalanx
MedGen UID:
892306
Concept ID:
C4021370
Anatomical Abnormality
Complete or partial duplication of the phalanges of the thumb. Depending on the severity, the appearance on x-ray can vary from a notched phalanx (the duplicated bone is almost completely fused with the phalanx), a partially fused appearance of the two bones (bifid), two separate bones appearing side to side, or completely duplicated phalanges (proximal and distal phalanx of the thumb and/or 1st metacarpal). In contrast to the phalanges of the digits 2-5 (proximal, middle and distal), the proximal phalanx of the thumb is embryologically equivalent to the middle phalanges of the other digits, whereas the first metacarpal is embryologically of phalangeal origin and as such equivalent to the proximal phalanges of the other digits.
Congenital septal defect
MedGen UID:
6752
Concept ID:
C0018816
Disease or Syndrome
A congenital disorder characterized by the presence of an abnormal communication between the atria or the ventricles of the heart due to defects in the cardiac septum.
Pulmonary valve defects
MedGen UID:
348039
Concept ID:
C1860165
Finding
Abnormality of cardiovascular system morphology
MedGen UID:
892473
Concept ID:
C4049796
Congenital Abnormality
Any structural anomaly of the heart and great vessels.
Failure to thrive
MedGen UID:
115900
Concept ID:
C0231246
Finding
Failure to thrive (FTT) refers to a child whose physical growth is substantially below the norm.
Postnatal growth retardation
MedGen UID:
395343
Concept ID:
C1859778
Finding
Slow or limited growth after birth.
Growth delay
MedGen UID:
765377
Concept ID:
C3552463
Sign or Symptom
A deficiency or slowing down of growth pre- and postnatally.
Imperforate anus
MedGen UID:
1997
Concept ID:
C0003466
Congenital Abnormality
A congenital abnormality characterized by the persistence of the anal membrane, resulting in a thin membrane covering the normal ANAL CANAL. Imperforation is not always complete and is treated by surgery in infancy. This defect is often associated with NEURAL TUBE DEFECTS; MENTAL RETARDATION; and DOWN SYNDROME.
Inguinal hernia
MedGen UID:
6817
Concept ID:
C0019294
Finding
An abdominal hernia with an external bulge in the GROIN region. It can be classified by the location of herniation. Indirect inguinal hernias occur through the internal inguinal ring. Direct inguinal hernias occur through defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL (transversalis fascia) in Hesselbach's triangle. The former type is commonly seen in children and young adults; the latter in adults.
Umbilical hernia
MedGen UID:
9232
Concept ID:
C0019322
Disease or Syndrome
Protrusion of abdominal contents through a defect in the abdominal wall musculature around the umbilicus. Skin and subcutaneous tissue overlie the defect.
Rectovaginal fistula
MedGen UID:
11152
Concept ID:
C0034895
Finding
An abnormal anatomical passage between the RECTUM and the VAGINA.
Hearing impairment
MedGen UID:
5453
Concept ID:
C0018772
Finding
A condition in which a person partially loses the ability to hear sounds in one or both ears.
Posteriorly rotated ears
MedGen UID:
96566
Concept ID:
C0431478
Congenital Abnormality
A type of abnormal location of the ears in which the position of the ears is characterized by posterior rotation (the superior part of the ears is rotated towards the back of the head, and the inferior part of the ears towards the front).
Abnormality of the pinna
MedGen UID:
167800
Concept ID:
C0857379
Finding
An abnormality of the pinna, which is also referred to as the auricle or external ear.
Seizure Disorders
MedGen UID:
4506
Concept ID:
C0014544
Disease or Syndrome
A brain disorder characterized by episodes of abnormally increased neuronal discharge resulting in transient episodes of sensory or motor neurological dysfunction, or psychic dysfunction. These episodes may or may not be associated with loss of consciousness or convulsions.
Intellectual disability, severe
MedGen UID:
48638
Concept ID:
C0036857
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Severe mental retardation is defined as an intelligence quotient (IQ) in the range of 20-34.
Corpus callosum agenesis
MedGen UID:
104498
Concept ID:
C0175754
Congenital Abnormality
The corpus callosum is the largest fiber tract in the central nervous system and the major interhemispheric fiber bundle in the brain. Formation of the corpus callosum begins as early as 6 weeks' gestation, with the first fibers crossing the midline at 11 to 12 weeks' gestation, and completion of the basic shape by age 18 to 20 weeks (Schell-Apacik et al., 2008). Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) is one of the most frequent malformations in brain with a reported incidence ranging between 0.5 and 70 in 10,000 births. ACC is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition, which can be observed either as an isolated condition or as a manifestation in the context of a congenital syndrome (see MOLECULAR GENETICS and Dobyns, 1996). Also see mirror movements-1 and/or agenesis of the corpus callosum (MRMV1; 157600). Schell-Apacik et al. (2008) noted that there is confusion in the literature regarding radiologic terminology concerning partial absence of the corpus callosum, where various designations have been used, including hypogenesis, hypoplasia, partial agenesis, or dysgenesis.
Aplasia/Hypoplasia of the corpus callosum
MedGen UID:
354608
Concept ID:
C1861866
Finding
Absence or underdevelopment of the corpus callosum.
Intellectual disability
MedGen UID:
811461
Concept ID:
C3714756
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. Intellectual disability, previously referred to as mental retardation, has been defined as an IQ score below 70.
Intracranial cystic lesion
MedGen UID:
866894
Concept ID:
C4021250
Finding
A cystic lesion originating within the brain.
Cryptorchidism, unilateral or bilateral
MedGen UID:
8192
Concept ID:
C0010417
Congenital Abnormality
Cryptorchidism, or failure of testicular descent, is a common human congenital abnormality with a multifactorial etiology that likely reflects the involvement of endocrine, environmental, and hereditary factors. Cryptorchidism can result in infertility and increases risk for testicular tumors. Testicular descent from abdomen to scrotum occurs in 2 distinct phases: the transabdominal phase and the inguinoscrotal phase (summary by Gorlov et al., 2002).
Rectovaginal fistula
MedGen UID:
11152
Concept ID:
C0034895
Finding
An abnormal anatomical passage between the RECTUM and the VAGINA.
Micropenis
MedGen UID:
78603
Concept ID:
C0266435
Congenital Abnormality
Abnormally small penis. At birth, the normal penis is about 3 cm (stretched length from pubic tubercle to tip of penis) with micropenis less than 2.0-2.5 cm.
Hypospadias
MedGen UID:
305577
Concept ID:
C1691215
Congenital Abnormality
Displacement of the urethral opening on the ventral (inferior) surface of the penis.
Generalized hypotonia
MedGen UID:
346841
Concept ID:
C1858120
Finding
Generalized muscular hypotonia (abnormally low muscle tone).
Finger syndactyly
MedGen UID:
65139
Concept ID:
C0221352
Congenital Abnormality
Webbing or fusion of the fingers, involving soft parts only or including bone structure. Bony fusions are revered to as \
Frontal bossing
MedGen UID:
67453
Concept ID:
C0221354
Congenital Abnormality
A skeletal deformity characterized by an unusually prominent forehead. Causes include acromegaly, Hurler syndrome, Silver-Russell syndrome, and thalassemia major.
Brachydactyly
MedGen UID:
67454
Concept ID:
C0221357
Congenital Abnormality
Congenital anomaly of abnormally short fingers or toes.
Toe syndactyly
MedGen UID:
75581
Concept ID:
C0265660
Congenital Abnormality
Webbing or fusion of the toes, involving soft parts only or including bone structure. Bony fusions are revered to as \
Tapered finger
MedGen UID:
98098
Concept ID:
C0426886
Finding
The gradual reduction in girth of the digit from proximal to distal.
Preaxial hand polydactyly
MedGen UID:
237235
Concept ID:
C1395852
Congenital Abnormality
Supernumerary digits located at the radial side of the hand. Polydactyly (supernumerary digits) involving the thumb occurs in many distinct forms of high variability and severity. Ranging from fleshy nubbins over varying degrees of partial duplication/splitting to completely duplicated or even triplicated thumbs or preaxial (on the radial side of the hand) supernumerary digits.
Microretrognathia
MedGen UID:
326907
Concept ID:
C1839546
Finding
A form of developmental hypoplasia of the mandible in which the mandible is mislocalised posteriorly.
Clinodactyly of the 5th finger
MedGen UID:
340456
Concept ID:
C1850049
Congenital Abnormality
Clinodactyly refers to a bending or curvature of the fifth finger in the radial direction (i.e., towards the 4th finger).
Prominent occiput
MedGen UID:
381255
Concept ID:
C1853737
Finding
Increased convexity of the occiput (posterior part of the skull).
Bifid thumb distal phalanx
MedGen UID:
348557
Concept ID:
C1860162
Finding
Partial duplication of the distal phalanx of the thumb. Depending on the severity, the appearance on x-ray can vary from a notched phalanx (the duplicated bone is almost completely fused with the phalanx) to a partially fused appearance of the two bones.
Duplication of phalanx of hallux
MedGen UID:
395424
Concept ID:
C1860164
Finding
Partial or complete duplication of one or more phalanx of big toe.
Wide anterior fontanel
MedGen UID:
400926
Concept ID:
C1866134
Finding
Enlargement of the anterior fontanelle with respect to age-dependent norms.
Postaxial foot polydactyly
MedGen UID:
384489
Concept ID:
C2112129
Finding
Polydactyly of the foot most commonly refers to the presence of six toes on one foot. Postaxial polydactyly affects the lateral ray and the duplication may range from a well-formed articulated digit to a rudimentary digit.
Postaxial hand polydactyly
MedGen UID:
892379
Concept ID:
C2112130
Supernumerary digits located at the ulnar side of the hand (that is, on the side with the fifth finger).
Preaxial foot polydactyly
MedGen UID:
389171
Concept ID:
C2112942
Finding
Duplication of all or part of the first ray.
Macrocephaly
MedGen UID:
745757
Concept ID:
C2243051
Finding
Macrocephaly refers to an abnormally enlarged head inclusive of the scalp, cranial bones, and intracranial contents. Macrocephaly may be due to megalencephaly (true enlargement of the brain parenchyma), and the 2 terms are often used interchangeably in the genetic literature (reviews by Olney, 2007 and Williams et al., 2008). Autosomal recessive macrocephaly/megalencephaly syndrome is characterized by an enlarged cranium apparent at birth or in early childhood. Affected individuals have intellectual disability and may have dysmorphic facial features resulting from the macrocephaly (summary by Alfaiz et al., 2014).
Duplication of thumb phalanx
MedGen UID:
892306
Concept ID:
C4021370
Anatomical Abnormality
Complete or partial duplication of the phalanges of the thumb. Depending on the severity, the appearance on x-ray can vary from a notched phalanx (the duplicated bone is almost completely fused with the phalanx), a partially fused appearance of the two bones (bifid), two separate bones appearing side to side, or completely duplicated phalanges (proximal and distal phalanx of the thumb and/or 1st metacarpal). In contrast to the phalanges of the digits 2-5 (proximal, middle and distal), the proximal phalanx of the thumb is embryologically equivalent to the middle phalanges of the other digits, whereas the first metacarpal is embryologically of phalangeal origin and as such equivalent to the proximal phalanges of the other digits.
Congenital ocular coloboma
MedGen UID:
1046
Concept ID:
C0009363
Congenital Abnormality
Coloboma is an ocular birth defect resulting from abnormal development of the eye during embryogenesis. It is defined as a congenital defect in any ocular tissue, typically presenting as absent tissue or a gap, at a site consistent with aberrant closure of the optic fissure. Failure of fusion can lead to coloboma of one or multiple regions of the inferior portion of the eye affecting any part of the globe traversed by the fissure, from the iris to the optic nerve, including the ciliary body, retina, and choroid. Coloboma is also frequently associated with small (microphthalmic) or absent (anophthalmic) eyes as part of an interrelated spectrum of developmental eye anomalies, and can affect either one or both eyes (summary by Kelberman et al., 2014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Ocular Coloboma A recessive form of ocular coloboma (216820) is caused by mutation in the SALL2 gene (602219) on chromosome 14q11.
Hypertelorism
MedGen UID:
9373
Concept ID:
C0020534
Finding
Although hypertelorism means an excessive distance between any paired organs (e.g., the nipples), the use of the word has come to be confined to ocular hypertelorism. Hypertelorism occurs as an isolated feature and is also a feature of many syndromes, e.g., Opitz G syndrome (145410), Greig cephalopolysyndactyly (175700), and Noonan syndrome (163950) (summary by Cohen et al., 1995).
Frontal bossing
MedGen UID:
67453
Concept ID:
C0221354
Congenital Abnormality
A skeletal deformity characterized by an unusually prominent forehead. Causes include acromegaly, Hurler syndrome, Silver-Russell syndrome, and thalassemia major.
Hypoplasia of teeth
MedGen UID:
852449
Concept ID:
C0235357
Congenital Abnormality
Developmental hypoplasia of teeth.
Open mouth
MedGen UID:
116104
Concept ID:
C0240379
Finding
A facial appearance characterized by a permanently or nearly permanently opened mouth.
High palate
MedGen UID:
66814
Concept ID:
C0240635
Congenital Abnormality
Height of the palate more than 2 SD above the mean (objective) or palatal height at the level of the first permanent molar more than twice the height of the teeth (subjective).
Downslanted palpebral fissures
MedGen UID:
98391
Concept ID:
C0423110
Finding
The palpebral fissure inclination is more than two standard deviations below the mean.
Thin vermilion border
MedGen UID:
108294
Concept ID:
C0578038
Finding
Reduced width of the \
Epicanthus
MedGen UID:
151862
Concept ID:
C0678230
Congenital Abnormality
Epicanthus is a condition in which a fold of skin stretches from the upper to the lower eyelid, partially covering the inner canthus. Usher (1935) noted that epicanthus is a normal finding in the fetus of all races. Epicanthus also occurs in association with hereditary ptosis (110100).
Flat philtrum
MedGen UID:
222980
Concept ID:
C1142533
Finding
Flat skin surface, with no ridge formation in the central region of the upper lip between the nasal base and upper vermilion border.
Microretrognathia
MedGen UID:
326907
Concept ID:
C1839546
Finding
A form of developmental hypoplasia of the mandible in which the mandible is mislocalised posteriorly.
Broad forehead
MedGen UID:
338610
Concept ID:
C1849089
Finding
Width of the forehead or distance between the frontotemporales is more than two standard deviations above the mean (objective); or apparently increased distance between the two sides of the forehead.
Triangular mouth
MedGen UID:
336578
Concept ID:
C1849341
Finding
The presence of a triangular form of the mouth.
Wide nasal bridge
MedGen UID:
341441
Concept ID:
C1849367
Finding
Increased breadth of the nasal bridge (and with it, the nasal root).
Prominent occiput
MedGen UID:
381255
Concept ID:
C1853737
Finding
Increased convexity of the occiput (posterior part of the skull).
Short nose
MedGen UID:
343052
Concept ID:
C1854114
Finding
Distance from nasion to subnasale more than two standard deviations below the mean, or alternatively, an apparently decreased length from the nasal root to the nasal tip.
Preauricular skin tag
MedGen UID:
395989
Concept ID:
C1860816
Finding
A rudimentary tag of sking often containing ear tissue including a core of cartilage and located just anterior to the auricle (outer part of the ear).
Short philtrum
MedGen UID:
350006
Concept ID:
C1861324
Finding
Distance between nasal base and midline upper lip vermilion border more than 2 SD below the mean. Alternatively, an apparently decreased distance between nasal base and midline upper lip vermilion border.
Long philtrum
MedGen UID:
351278
Concept ID:
C1865014
Finding
Distance between nasal base and midline upper lip vermilion border more than 2 SD above the mean. Alternatively, an apparently increased distance between nasal base and midline upper lip vermilion border.
Wide anterior fontanel
MedGen UID:
400926
Concept ID:
C1866134
Finding
Enlargement of the anterior fontanelle with respect to age-dependent norms.
Prominent forehead
MedGen UID:
401234
Concept ID:
C1867446
Finding
Forward prominence of the entire forehead, due to protrusion of the frontal bone.
Macrocephaly
MedGen UID:
745757
Concept ID:
C2243051
Finding
Macrocephaly refers to an abnormally enlarged head inclusive of the scalp, cranial bones, and intracranial contents. Macrocephaly may be due to megalencephaly (true enlargement of the brain parenchyma), and the 2 terms are often used interchangeably in the genetic literature (reviews by Olney, 2007 and Williams et al., 2008). Autosomal recessive macrocephaly/megalencephaly syndrome is characterized by an enlarged cranium apparent at birth or in early childhood. Affected individuals have intellectual disability and may have dysmorphic facial features resulting from the macrocephaly (summary by Alfaiz et al., 2014).
Cleft secondary palate
MedGen UID:
756015
Concept ID:
C2981150
Congenital Abnormality
Cleft palate is a developmental defect of the palate resulting from a failure of fusion of the palatine processes and manifesting as a separation of the roof of the mouth (soft and hard palate).
Cleft upper lip
MedGen UID:
892653
Concept ID:
C4020893
A gap in the upper lip. This is a congenital defect resulting from nonfusion of tissues of the lip during embryonal development.
Inguinal hernia
MedGen UID:
6817
Concept ID:
C0019294
Finding
An abdominal hernia with an external bulge in the GROIN region. It can be classified by the location of herniation. Indirect inguinal hernias occur through the internal inguinal ring. Direct inguinal hernias occur through defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL (transversalis fascia) in Hesselbach's triangle. The former type is commonly seen in children and young adults; the latter in adults.
Umbilical hernia
MedGen UID:
9232
Concept ID:
C0019322
Disease or Syndrome
Protrusion of abdominal contents through a defect in the abdominal wall musculature around the umbilicus. Skin and subcutaneous tissue overlie the defect.
Preauricular skin tag
MedGen UID:
395989
Concept ID:
C1860816
Finding
A rudimentary tag of sking often containing ear tissue including a core of cartilage and located just anterior to the auricle (outer part of the ear).

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