Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

Duane retraction syndrome 2(DURS2)

MedGen UID:
196721
Concept ID:
C0751083
Disease or Syndrome
Synonym: Duane syndrome type 2
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal dominant inheritance
MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Intellectual Product
Sources: HPO, OMIM
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in heterozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, an autosomal dominant disorder is caused when a single copy of the mutant allele is present. Males and females are affected equally, and can both transmit the disorder with a risk of 50% for each child of inheriting the mutant allele.
 
Gene (location): CHN1 (2q31.1)
 
OMIM®: 604356

Disease characteristics

Excerpted from the GeneReview: Duane Syndrome
Duane syndrome is a strabismus condition clinically characterized by congenital non-progressive limited horizontal eye movement accompanied by globe retraction which results in narrowing of the palpebral fissure. The lateral movement anomaly results from failure of the abducens nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve VI) to fully innervate the lateral rectus muscle; globe retraction occurs as a result of abnormal innervation of the lateral rectus muscle by the oculomotor nerve (cranial nerve III). At birth, affected infants have restricted ability to move the affected eye(s) outward (abduction) and/or inward (adduction), though the limitations may not be recognized in early infancy. In addition, the globe retracts into the orbit with attempted adduction, accompanied by narrowing of the palpebral fissure. Many individuals with Duane syndrome have strabismus in primary gaze but can use a compensatory head turn to align the eyes, and thus can preserve binocular vision and avoid diplopia. Individuals with Duane syndrome who lack binocular vision are at risk for amblyopia. The majority of affected individuals with Duane syndrome have isolated Duane syndrome (i.e., they do not have other detected congenital anomalies). Other individuals with Duane syndrome fall into well-defined syndromic diagnoses. However, many individuals with Duane syndrome have non-ocular findings that do not fit a known syndrome; these individuals are included as part of the discussion of nonsyndromic Duane syndrome. [from GeneReviews]
Authors:
Brenda J Barry  |  Mary C Whitman  |  David G Hunter, et. al.   view full author information

Additional descriptions

From OMIM
Duane retraction syndrome (DURS) is a congenital disorder characterized by restricted horizontal eye movement with globe retraction and palpebral fissure narrowing on attempted adduction. DURS is observed in approximately 0.1% of the general population, accounts for 1 to 5% of all strabismus, and if untreated in childhood can result in loss of binocular vision and amblyopia. Postmortem examinations of individuals with sporadic DURS have shown absence of the abducens motor neurons and abducens cranial nerve on the affected side(s), and aberrant innervation of the lateral rectus by axons of the oculomotor nerve that normally innervate the medial rectus muscle. Most patients are affected unilaterally and have no family history of the disorder (summary by Miyake et al., 2010). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Duane retraction syndrome, see DURS1 (126800).  http://www.omim.org/entry/604356
From MedlinePlus Genetics
Isolated Duane retraction syndrome is a disorder of eye movement. This condition prevents outward movement of the eye (toward the ear), and in some cases may also limit inward eye movement (toward the nose). As the eye moves inward, the eyelids partially close and the eyeball pulls back (retracts) into its socket. Most commonly, only one eye is affected. About 10 percent of people with isolated Duane retraction syndrome develop amblyopia ("lazy eye"), a condition that causes vision loss in the affected eye.\n\nAbout 70 percent of all cases of Duane retraction syndrome are isolated, which means they occur without other signs and symptoms. Duane retraction syndrome can also occur as part of syndromes that affect other areas of the body. For example, Duane-radial ray syndrome is characterized by this eye disorder in conjunction with abnormalities of bones in the arms and hands.\n\nResearchers have identified three forms of isolated Duane retraction syndrome, designated types I, II, and III. The types vary in which eye movements are most severely restricted (inward, outward, or both). All three types are characterized by retraction of the eyeball as the eye moves inward.  https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/isolated-duane-retraction-syndrome
From MedlinePlus Genetics
Isolated Duane retraction syndrome is a disorder of eye movement. This condition prevents outward movement of the eye (toward the ear), and in some cases may also limit inward eye movement (toward the nose). As the eye moves inward, the eyelids partially close and the eyeball pulls back (retracts) into its socket. Most commonly, only one eye is affected. About 10 percent of people with isolated Duane retraction syndrome develop amblyopia ("lazy eye"), a condition that causes vision loss in the affected eye.\n\nResearchers have identified three forms of isolated Duane retraction syndrome, designated types I, II, and III. The types vary in which eye movements are most severely restricted (inward, outward, or both). All three types are characterized by retraction of the eyeball as the eye moves inward.\n\nAbout 70 percent of all cases of Duane retraction syndrome are isolated, which means they occur without other signs and symptoms. Duane retraction syndrome can also occur as part of syndromes that affect other areas of the body. For example, Duane-radial ray syndrome is characterized by this eye disorder in conjunction with abnormalities of bones in the arms and hands.  https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/isolated-duane-retraction-syndrome

Clinical features

From HPO
Amblyopia
MedGen UID:
8009
Concept ID:
C0002418
Disease or Syndrome
Reduced visual acuity that is uncorrectable by lenses in the absence of detectable anatomic defects in the eye or visual pathways.
Strabismus
MedGen UID:
21337
Concept ID:
C0038379
Disease or Syndrome
A misalignment of the eyes so that the visual axes deviate from bifoveal fixation. The classification of strabismus may be based on a number of features including the relative position of the eyes, whether the deviation is latent or manifest, intermittent or constant, concomitant or otherwise and according to the age of onset and the relevance of any associated refractive error.
Duane anomaly
MedGen UID:
375895
Concept ID:
C1846464
Finding

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Sener EC, Yilmaz PT, Fatihoglu ÖU
J AAPOS 2019 Feb;23(1):25.e1-25.e4. Epub 2019 Jan 14 doi: 10.1016/j.jaapos.2018.10.011. PMID: 30654143

Therapy

Sener EC, Yilmaz PT, Fatihoglu ÖU
J AAPOS 2019 Feb;23(1):25.e1-25.e4. Epub 2019 Jan 14 doi: 10.1016/j.jaapos.2018.10.011. PMID: 30654143

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center