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Fever

MedGen UID:
5169
Concept ID:
C0015967
Sign or Symptom
Synonyms: Hyperthermia; Pyrexia
SNOMED CT: Has a temperature (50177009); Temperature raised (50177009); Increased body temperature (50177009); Fever (386661006); Pyrexial (386661006); Pyrexia (386661006); Febrile (386661006); Temperature elevated (50177009); Body temperature above reference range (50177009); High body temperature (50177009); Hyperthermia (50177009)
 
HPO: HP:0001945

Definition

Body temperature elevated above the normal range. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Myelofibrosis
MedGen UID:
7929
Concept ID:
C0001815
Neoplastic Process
Primary myelofibrosis is a condition characterized by the buildup of scar tissue (fibrosis) in the bone marrow, the tissue that produces blood cells. Because of the fibrosis, the bone marrow is unable to make enough normal blood cells. The shortage of blood cells causes many of the signs and symptoms of primary myelofibrosis.\n\nInitially, most people with primary myelofibrosis have no signs or symptoms. Eventually, fibrosis can lead to a reduction in the number of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. A shortage of red blood cells (anemia) often causes extreme tiredness (fatigue) or shortness of breath. A loss of white blood cells can lead to an increased number of infections, and a reduction of platelets can cause easy bleeding or bruising.\n\nBecause blood cell formation (hematopoiesis) in the bone marrow is disrupted, other organs such as the spleen or liver may begin to produce blood cells. This process, called extramedullary hematopoiesis, often leads to an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly) or an enlarged liver (hepatomegaly). People with splenomegaly may feel pain or fullness in the abdomen, especially below the ribs on the left side. Other common signs and symptoms of primary myelofibrosis include fever, night sweats, and bone pain.\n\nPrimary myelofibrosis is most commonly diagnosed in people aged 50 to 80 but can occur at any age.
Rheumatoid arthritis
MedGen UID:
2078
Concept ID:
C0003873
Disease or Syndrome
Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease, primarily of the joints, with autoimmune features and a complex genetic component.
Fructose-biphosphatase deficiency
MedGen UID:
42106
Concept ID:
C0016756
Disease or Syndrome
Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP1) deficiency is characterized by episodic acute crises of lactic acidosis and ketotic hypoglycemia, manifesting as hyperventilation, apneic spells, seizures, and/or coma. Acute crises are most common in early childhood; nearly half of affected children have hypoglycemia in the neonatal period (especially the first 4 days) resulting from deficient glycogen stores. Factors known to trigger episodes include fever, fasting, decreased oral intake, vomiting, infections, and ingestion of large amounts of fructose. In untreated individuals, symptoms worsen progressively as continued catabolism leads to multiorgan failure (especially liver, brain, and later heart). Morbidity and mortality are high. Sepsis, blindness, and Reye syndrome-like presentation have been reported. In between acute episodes, children are asymptomatic. While the majority of affected children have normal growth and psychomotor development, a few have intellectual disability, presumably due to early and prolonged hypoglycemia.
Glycogen storage disease, type II
MedGen UID:
5340
Concept ID:
C0017921
Disease or Syndrome
Pompe disease is classified by age of onset, organ involvement, severity, and rate of progression. Infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD; individuals with onset before age 12 months with cardiomyopathy) may be apparent in utero but more typically onset is at the median age of four months with hypotonia, generalized muscle weakness, feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, respiratory distress, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Without treatment by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), IOPD commonly results in death by age two years from progressive left ventricular outflow obstruction and respiratory insufficiency. Late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD; including: (a) individuals with onset before age 12 months without cardiomyopathy; and (b) all individuals with onset after age 12 months) is characterized by proximal muscle weakness and respiratory insufficiency; clinically significant cardiac involvement is uncommon.
Infantile cortical hyperostosis
MedGen UID:
43781
Concept ID:
C0020497
Disease or Syndrome
Caffey disease is characterized by massive subperiosteal new bone formation (usually involving the diaphyses of the long bones as well as the ribs, mandible, scapulae, and clavicles) typically associated with fever, joint swelling, and pain in children, with onset between birth and five months and spontaneous resolution by age two years. Episodes of recurrence of the manifestations of Caffey disease have been reported multiple times in individuals with the classic infantile presentation. Limited follow-up information suggests that adults who had Caffey disease in childhood may manifest joint laxity, skin hyperextensibility, hernias, short stature, and an increased risk for bone fractures and/or deformities.
Letterer-siwe disease
MedGen UID:
7311
Concept ID:
C0023381
Disease or Syndrome
A multifocal, multisystem form of Langerhans-cell histiocytosis. There is involvement of multiple organ systems including the bones, skin, liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Patients are usually infants presenting with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, bone and skin lesions, and pancytopenia.
Neuroblastoma
MedGen UID:
18012
Concept ID:
C0027819
Neoplastic Process
ALK-related neuroblastic tumor susceptibility is characterized by increased risk for neuroblastic tumors including neuroblastoma, ganglioneuroblastoma, and ganglioneuroma. Neuroblastoma is a more malignant tumor and ganglioneuroma a more benign tumor. Depending on the histologic findings, ganglioneuroblastoma can behave in a more aggressive fashion, like neuroblastoma, or in a benign fashion, like ganglioneuroma. Preliminary data from the ten reported families with ALK-related neuroblastic tumor susceptibility suggest an overall penetrance of approximately 57% with the risk for neuroblastic tumor development highest in infancy and decreasing by late childhood.
Stiff-man syndrome
MedGen UID:
39017
Concept ID:
C0085292
Disease or Syndrome
The stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is most often an adult-onset sporadic acquired disorder characterized by progressive muscle stiffness with superimposed painful muscle spasms accompanied by electromyographic evidence of continuous motor activity at rest. SPS has been associated with autoimmune disorders, diabetes mellitus, thyrotoxicosis, and hypopituitarism with adrenal insufficiency (George et al., 1984). Approximately 60% of patients with SPS have antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD2, or GAD65; 138275), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting an immune-mediated pathogenesis (Folli et al., 1993). Approximately 10% of patients develop SPS as a paraneoplastic neurologic disorder associated with antibodies to amphiphysin (AMPH; 600418), an intracellular protein associated with neuronal synaptic vesicle endocytosis (Burns, 2005). See also congenital stiff-man syndrome, or hereditary hyperexplexia (149400), which is caused by mutations in subunits of the glycine receptor gene (GLRA1, 138491; GLRB, 138492). Meinck and Thompson (2002) provided a detailed review of stiff-person syndrome. They also discussed 2 possibly related conditions, progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity (PERM), a more severe disorder with other neurologic features, and stiff-limb or stiff-leg syndrome, a focal disorder.
Hypohidrotic X-linked ectodermal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
57890
Concept ID:
C0162359
Disease or Syndrome
Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is characterized by hypotrichosis (sparseness of scalp and body hair), hypohidrosis (reduced ability to sweat), and hypodontia (congenital absence of teeth). The cardinal features of classic HED become obvious during childhood. The scalp hair is thin, lightly pigmented, and slow-growing. Sweating, although present, is greatly deficient, leading to episodes of hyperthermia until the affected individual or family acquires experience with environmental modifications to control temperature. Only a few abnormally formed teeth erupt, and at a later-than-average age. Physical growth and psychomotor development are otherwise within normal limits. Mild HED is characterized by mild manifestations of any or all the characteristic features.
Caroli disease
MedGen UID:
57924
Concept ID:
C0162510
Congenital Abnormality
A rare congenital disorder characterised by multifocal, segmental dilatation of the large intrahepatic bile ducts. It may present at any age and predominantly affects females. Less than 250 cases have been described worldwide. Caroli disease is characterised by bile ductal ectasia without other apparent hepatic abnormalities. It presents with recurrent bacterial cholangitis, biliary stones causing biliary pain or episodes of pancreatitis. The more common variant of this disease, named Caroli syndrome, is characterised by dilatations of the large bile duct associated with congenital hepatic fibrosis. The aetiology of Caroli disease is unknown and its occurrence is sporadic, whereas Caroli syndrome is generally inherited in an autosomal recessive manner.
Fatal familial insomnia
MedGen UID:
104768
Concept ID:
C0206042
Disease or Syndrome
Genetic prion disease generally manifests with cognitive difficulties, ataxia, and myoclonus (abrupt jerking movements of muscle groups and/or entire limbs). The order of appearance and/or predominance of these features and other associated neurologic and psychiatric findings vary. The three major phenotypes of genetic prion disease are genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (gCJD), fatal familial insomnia (FFI), and Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome. Although these phenotypes display overlapping clinical and pathologic features, recognition of these phenotypes can be useful when providing affected individuals and their families with information about the expected clinical course. The age at onset typically ranges from 50 to 60 years. The disease course ranges from a few months in gCJD and FFI to a few (up to 4, and in rare cases up to 10) years in GSS syndrome.
Cyclical neutropenia
MedGen UID:
65121
Concept ID:
C0221023
Disease or Syndrome
ELANE-related neutropenia includes congenital neutropenia and cyclic neutropenia, both of which are primary hematologic disorders characterized by recurrent fever, skin and oropharyngeal inflammation (i.e., mouth ulcers, gingivitis, sinusitis, and pharyngitis), and cervical adenopathy. Infectious complications are generally more severe in congenital neutropenia than in cyclic neutropenia. In congenital neutropenia, omphalitis immediately after birth may be the first sign; in untreated children diarrhea, pneumonia, and deep abscesses in the liver, lungs, and subcutaneous tissues are common in the first year of life. After 15 years with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment, the risk of developing myelodysplasia (MDS) or acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is approximately 15%-25%. Cyclic neutropenia is usually diagnosed within the first year of life based on approximately three-week intervals of fever and oral ulcerations and regular oscillations of blood cell counts. Cellulitis, especially perianal cellulitis, is common during neutropenic periods. Between neutropenic periods, affected individuals are generally healthy. Symptoms improve in adulthood. Cyclic neutropenia is not associated with risk of malignancy or conversion to leukemia.
Hereditary pancreatitis
MedGen UID:
116056
Concept ID:
C0238339
Disease or Syndrome
PRSS1-related hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is characterized by episodes of acute pancreatitis (AP) and recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP: >1 episode of AP), with frequent progression to chronic pancreatitis (CP). Manifestations of acute pancreatitis can range from vague abdominal pain lasting one to three days to severe abdominal pain lasting days to weeks and requiring hospitalization.
Halothane hepatitis
MedGen UID:
66842
Concept ID:
C0241913
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile hypophosphatasia
MedGen UID:
75677
Concept ID:
C0268412
Disease or Syndrome
Hypophosphatasia is characterized by defective mineralization of bone and/or teeth in the presence of low activity of serum and bone alkaline phosphatase. Clinical features range from stillbirth without mineralized bone at the severe end to pathologic fractures of the lower extremities in later adulthood at the mild end. Although the disease spectrum is a continuum, six clinical forms are usually recognized based on age at diagnosis and severity of features: Perinatal (severe) hypophosphatasia characterized by respiratory insufficiency and hypercalcemia. Perinatal (benign) hypophosphatasia with prenatal skeletal manifestations that slowly resolve into one of the milder forms. Infantile hypophosphatasia with onset between birth and age six months of rickets without elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity. Childhood (juvenile) hypophosphatasia that ranges from low bone mineral density for age with unexplained fractures to rickets, and premature loss of primary teeth with intact roots. Adult hypophosphatasia characterized by stress fractures and pseudofractures of the lower extremities in middle age, sometimes associated with early loss of adult dentition. Odontohypophosphatasia characterized by premature exfoliation of primary teeth and/or severe dental caries without skeletal manifestations.
Deficiency of hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA lyase
MedGen UID:
78692
Concept ID:
C0268601
Disease or Syndrome
3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with the cardinal manifestations of metabolic acidosis without ketonuria, hypoglycemia, and a characteristic pattern of elevated urinary organic acid metabolites, including 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric, 3-methylglutaric, and 3-hydroxyisovaleric acids. Urinary levels of 3-methylcrotonylglycine may be increased. Dicarboxylic aciduria, hepatomegaly, and hyperammonemia may also be observed. Presenting clinical signs include irritability, lethargy, coma, and vomiting (summary by Gibson et al., 1988).
Pustular psoriasis, generalized
MedGen UID:
473074
Concept ID:
C0343055
Disease or Syndrome
Generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) is a life-threatening disease characterized by sudden, repeated episodes of high-grade fever, generalized rash, and disseminated pustules, with hyperleukocytosis and elevated serum levels of C-reactive protein (123260) (summary by Marrakchi et al., 2011). GPP often presents in patients with existing or prior psoriasis vulgaris (PV; see 177900); however, GPP can develop without a history of PV (Sugiura et al., 2013). Palmoplantar pustulosis and acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau represent acral forms of pustular psoriasis that have historically been grouped with GPP (summary by Setta-Kaffetzi et al., 2013). GPP in association with sterile multifocal osteomyelitis and periostitis (612852) is caused by mutation in the IL1RN gene (147679). Capon (2013) noted that the percentage of GPP patients reported to be negative for mutation in IL36RN ranges from 51 to 84%, indicative of genetic heterogeneity in the generalized pustular form of psoriasis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of psoriasis, see PSORS1 (177900).
Anti-glomerular basement membrane disease
MedGen UID:
140788
Concept ID:
C0403529
Disease or Syndrome
A rapidly progressive and generally fulminant rare autoimmune condition characterized by the presence of anti-GBM antibodies, affecting glomerular and/or pulmonary capillaries. It may manifest as an isolated glomerulonephritis (anti-GBM nephritis) or as a pulmonary-renal syndrome with severe lung hemorrhage (Goodpasture's syndrome).
Chronic multifocal osteomyelitis
MedGen UID:
140822
Concept ID:
C0410422
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is a rare pediatric autoinflammatory bone disease, the primary symptom of which is bone pain due to sterile osteomyelitis. It is often associated with psoriasis or inflammatory bowel disease (Cox et al., 2017). Multifocal osteomyelitis associated with pustulosis has also been described (see 612852).
Pseudodiastrophic dysplasia
MedGen UID:
140924
Concept ID:
C0432206
Disease or Syndrome
Pseudodiastrophic dysplasia (PDD) is an extremely rare and severe skeletal dysplasia associated with prenatal manifestation and early lethality. Phenotypic features include short-limbed short stature at birth, facial dysmorphism, and distinctive skeletal abnormalities including short ribs, mild to moderate platyspondyly, shortened long bones with metaphyseal flaring, elongation of the proximal and middle phalanges with subluxation of the proximal interphalangeal joints, subluxation of the elbow, and talipes equinovarus (summary by Byrne et al., 2020). Based on genetic analysis of patients with a clinical diagnosis of PDD, Byrne et al. (2020) proposed that PDD is likely not a separate genetic disorder, but rather the most severe phenotypic manifestation of skeletal dysplasia arising from defects in proteoglycan (PG) biosynthesis (see MOLECULAR GENETICS).
Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma
MedGen UID:
99306
Concept ID:
C0522624
Neoplastic Process
Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma (SPTCL) is an uncommon form of T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma in which cytotoxic CD8 (see 186910)+ T cells infiltrate adipose tissue forming subcutaneous nodules. Both children and adults can be affected, with a median age at diagnosis of 36 years and a female gender bias. Most patients have accompanying systemic features such as fever or flank pain. A subset (about 20%) of patients develop hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), usually associated with CD8+ T cells rimming adipocytes in the bone marrow. An infectious agent is not identified, and the disorder is believed to result from improperly activated inflammation. Immunosuppressive therapy may be helpful; hematopoietic bone marrow transplantation is usually curative (summary by Gayden et al., 2018). For a general discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLH, see HLH1 (267700).
Central core myopathy
MedGen UID:
199773
Concept ID:
C0751951
Disease or Syndrome
Typical central core disease is a relatively mild congenital myopathy, usually characterized by motor developmental delay and signs of mild proximal weakness most pronounced in the hip girdle musculature. Orthopedic complications, particularly congenital dislocation of the hips and scoliosis, are common, and CCD patients are at risk of having malignant hyperthermia (MHS1; 145600). Onset of CCD is usually in childhood, although adult onset has also been reported, illustrating phenotypic variability (Jungbluth et al., 2009). Some patients can present in utero or at birth with severe congenital myopathy (Bharucha-Goebel et al., 2013).
Aicardi Goutieres syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
162912
Concept ID:
C0796126
Disease or Syndrome
Most characteristically, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) manifests as an early-onset encephalopathy that usually, but not always, results in severe intellectual and physical disability. A subgroup of infants with AGS present at birth with abnormal neurologic findings, hepatosplenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia, a picture highly suggestive of congenital infection. Otherwise, most affected infants present at variable times after the first few weeks of life, frequently after a period of apparently normal development. Typically, they demonstrate the subacute onset of a severe encephalopathy characterized by extreme irritability, intermittent sterile pyrexias, loss of skills, and slowing of head growth. Over time, as many as 40% develop chilblain skin lesions on the fingers, toes, and ears. It is becoming apparent that atypical, sometimes milder, cases of AGS exist, and thus the true extent of the phenotype associated with pathogenic variants in the AGS-related genes is not yet known.
Upshaw-Schulman syndrome
MedGen UID:
224783
Concept ID:
C1268935
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), also known as Upshaw-Schulman syndrome (USS), is a rare autosomal recessive thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Clinically, acute phases of TTP are defined by microangiopathic mechanical hemolytic anemia, severe thrombocytopenia, and visceral ischemia. Hereditary TTP makes up 5% of TTP cases and is caused mostly by biallelic mutation in the ADAMTS13 gene, or in very rare cases, by monoallelic ADAMTS13 mutation associated with a cluster of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); most cases of all TTP (95%) are acquired via an autoimmune mechanism (see 188030). Hereditary TTP is more frequent among child-onset TTP compared with adult-onset TTP, and its clinical presentation is significantly different as a function of its age of onset. Child-onset TTP usually starts in the neonatal period with hematological features and severe jaundice. In contrast, almost all cases of adult-onset hereditary TTP are unmasked during the first pregnancy of a woman whose disease was silent during childhood (summary by Joly et al., 2018).
Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1
MedGen UID:
331388
Concept ID:
C1832884
Disease or Syndrome
Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) falls within the category of migraine with aura. In migraine with aura (including FHM) the neurologic symptoms of aura are unequivocally localizable to the cerebral cortex or brain stem and include visual disturbance (most common), sensory loss (e.g., numbness or paresthesias of the face or an extremity), and dysphasia (difficulty with speech). FHM must include motor involvement, such as hemiparesis (weakness of an extremity). Hemiparesis occurs with at least one other symptom during FHM aura. Neurologic deficits with FHM attacks can be prolonged for hours to days and may outlast the associated migrainous headache. FHM is often earlier in onset than typical migraine, frequently beginning in the first or second decade; the frequency of attacks tends to decrease with age. Approximately 40%-50% of families with CACNA1A-FHM have cerebellar signs ranging from nystagmus to progressive, usually late-onset mild ataxia.
Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis 3
MedGen UID:
332383
Concept ID:
C1837174
Disease or Syndrome
Secretion of the contents of cytolytic granules at the immunologic synapse is a highly regulated process essential for lymphocyte cytotoxicity. This process requires the rapid transfer of perforin (170280)-containing lytic granules to the target cell interface, followed by their docking and fusion with the plasma membrane. Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by defective cytotoxicity. For a more detailed description of FHL, see 267700.
Hyperthermia, cutaneous, with headaches and nausea
MedGen UID:
374453
Concept ID:
C1840373
Disease or Syndrome
Biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease
MedGen UID:
375289
Concept ID:
C1843807
Disease or Syndrome
Biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease (BTBGD) may present in childhood, early infancy, or adulthood. The classic presentation of BTBGD occurs in childhood (age 3-10 years) and is characterized by recurrent subacute encephalopathy manifest as confusion, seizures, ataxia, dystonia, supranuclear facial palsy, external ophthalmoplegia, and/or dysphagia which, if left untreated, can eventually lead to coma and even death. Dystonia and cogwheel rigidity are nearly always present; hyperreflexia, ankle clonus, and Babinski responses are common. Hemiparesis or quadriparesis may be seen. Episodes are often triggered by febrile illness or mild trauma or stress. Simple partial or generalized seizures are easily controlled with antiepileptic drugs. An early-infantile Leigh-like syndrome / atypical infantile spasms presentation occurs in the first three months of life with poor feeding, vomiting, acute encephalopathy, and severe lactic acidosis. An adult-onset Wernicke-like encephalopathy presentation is characterized by acute onset of status epilepticus, ataxia, nystagmus, diplopia, and ophthalmoplegia in the second decade of life. Prompt administration of biotin and thiamine early in the disease course results in partial or complete improvement within days in the childhood and adult presentations, but most with the infantile presentation have had poor outcome even after supplementation with biotin and thiamine.
Lymphoproliferative syndrome 2, X-linked
MedGen UID:
336848
Concept ID:
C1845076
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) has two recognizable subtypes, XLP1 and XLP2. XLP1 is characterized predominantly by one of three commonly recognized phenotypes: Inappropriate immune response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection leading to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) or severe mononucleosis. Dysgammaglobulinemia. Lymphoproliferative disease (malignant lymphoma). XLP2 is most often characterized by HLH (often associated with EBV), dysgammaglobulinemia, and inflammatory bowel disease. HLH resulting from EBV infection is associated with an unregulated and exaggerated immune response with widespread proliferation of cytotoxic T cells, EBV-infected B cells, and macrophages. Dysgammaglobulinemia is typically hypogammaglobulinemia of one or more immunoglobulin subclasses. The malignant lymphomas are typically B-cell lymphomas, non-Hodgkin type, often extranodal, and in particular involving the intestine.
Susceptibility to acute rheumatic fever
MedGen UID:
341445
Concept ID:
C1849383
Finding
Myoglobinuria, acute recurrent, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
340308
Concept ID:
C1849386
Disease or Syndrome
Recurrent myoglobinuria is characterized by recurrent attacks of rhabdomyolysis associated with muscle pain and weakness and followed by excretion of myoglobin in the urine. Renal failure may occasionally occur. Onset is usually in early childhood under the age of 5 years. Unlike the exercise-induced rhabdomyolyses such as McArdle syndrome (232600), carnitine palmitoyltransferase deficiency (see 255110), and the Creteil variety of phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency (311800), the attacks in recurrent myoglobinuria no relation to exercise, but are triggered by intercurrent illnesses, commonly upper respiratory tract infections. (Ramesh and Gardner-Medwin, 1992). See 160010 for discussion of a possible autosomal dominant form of myglobinuria. Severe rhabdomyolysis is a major clinical feature of anesthetic-induced malignant hyperthermia (145600), an autosomal dominant disorder.
Pelger-Huet-like anomaly and episodic fever with abdominal pain
MedGen UID:
376692
Concept ID:
C1850054
Disease or Syndrome
Neuropathy, painful
MedGen UID:
342490
Concept ID:
C1850383
Disease or Syndrome
Bartter syndrome, type 2, antenatal
MedGen UID:
343428
Concept ID:
C1855849
Disease or Syndrome
Bartter syndrome refers to a group of disorders that are unified by autosomal recessive transmission of impaired salt reabsorption in the thick ascending loop of Henle with pronounced salt wasting, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, and hypercalciuria. Clinical disease results from defective renal reabsorption of sodium chloride in the thick ascending limb (TAL) of the Henle loop, where 30% of filtered salt is normally reabsorbed (Simon et al., 1997). Patients with antenatal forms of Bartter syndrome typically present with premature birth associated with polyhydramnios and low birth weight and may develop life-threatening dehydration in the neonatal period. Patients with classic Bartter syndrome (see BARTS3, 607364) present later in life and may be sporadically asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic (summary by Simon et al., 1996 and Fremont and Chan, 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bartter syndrome, see 607364.
Hypohidrosis with abnormal palmar dermal ridges
MedGen UID:
340989
Concept ID:
C1855856
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperphosphatemia, polyuria, and seizures
MedGen UID:
343444
Concept ID:
C1855922
Disease or Syndrome
Fever, familial lifelong persistent
MedGen UID:
346443
Concept ID:
C1856788
Disease or Syndrome
Dermatoosteolysis, Kirghizian type
MedGen UID:
341742
Concept ID:
C1857301
Disease or Syndrome
Disease with characteristics of recurrent skin ulceration, arthralgia, fever, peri-articular osteolysis, oligodontia and nail dystrophy. This disease has been described in five siblings in a family of Kirghizian origin (Central Asia). Three of the siblings also presented with keratitis leading to visual impairment or blindness. Transmission is autosomal recessive.
Leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter
MedGen UID:
347037
Concept ID:
C1858991
Disease or Syndrome
Childhood ataxia with central nervous system hypomyelination / vanishing white matter (CACH/VWM) is characterized by ataxia, spasticity, and variable optic atrophy. The phenotypic range includes a prenatal/congenital form, a subacute infantile form (onset age <1 year), an early childhood-onset form (onset age 1 to <4 years), a late childhood-/juvenile-onset form (onset age 4 to <18 years), and an adult-onset form (onset =18 years). The prenatal/congenital form is characterized by severe encephalopathy. In the later-onset forms initial motor and intellectual development is normal or mildly delayed, followed by neurologic deterioration with a chronic progressive or subacute course. While in childhood-onset forms motor deterioration dominates, in adult-onset forms cognitive decline and personality changes dominate. Chronic progressive decline can be exacerbated by rapid deterioration during febrile illnesses or following head trauma or major surgical procedures, or by acute and extreme fright.
Familial cirrhosis
MedGen UID:
350049
Concept ID:
C1861556
Disease or Syndrome
Arteritis, familial granulomatous, with juvenile polyarthritis
MedGen UID:
349529
Concept ID:
C1862510
Disease or Syndrome
Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis 2
MedGen UID:
400366
Concept ID:
C1863727
Disease or Syndrome
Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis-2 (FHL2) is an autosomal recessive disorder of immune dysregulation with onset in infancy or early childhood. It is characterized clinically by fever, edema, hepatosplenomegaly, and liver dysfunction. Neurologic impairment, seizures, and ataxia are frequent. Laboratory studies show pancytopenia, coagulation abnormalities, hypofibrinogenemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. There is increased production of cytokines, such as gamma-interferon (IFNG; 147570) and TNF-alpha (191160), by hyperactivation and proliferation of T cells and macrophages. Activity of cytotoxic T cells and NK cells is reduced, consistent with a defect in cellular cytotoxicity. Bone marrow, lymph nodes, spleen, and liver show features of hemophagocytosis. Chemotherapy and/or immunosuppressant therapy may result in symptomatic remission, but the disorder is fatal without bone marrow transplantation (summary by Dufourcq-Lagelouse et al., 1999, Stepp et al., 1999, and Molleran Lee et al., 2004). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of FHL, see 267700.
Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis 4
MedGen UID:
350245
Concept ID:
C1863728
Disease or Syndrome
Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a hyperinflammatory disorder clinically diagnosed based on the fulfillment of 5 of 8 criteria, including fever, splenomegaly, bicytopenia, hypertriglyceridemia and/or hypofibrinogenemia, hemophagocytosis, low or absent natural killer (NK) cell activity, hyperferritinemia, and high soluble IL2 receptor levels (IL2R; 147730). The disorder typically presents in infancy or early childhood. Persistent remission is rarely achieved with chemo- or immunotherapy; hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only cure (summary by Muller et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL), see 267700.
Histiocytosis-lymphadenopathy plus syndrome
MedGen UID:
400532
Concept ID:
C1864445
Disease or Syndrome
The histiocytosis-lymphadenopathy plus syndrome comprises features of 4 histiocytic disorders previously thought to be distinct: Faisalabad histiocytosis (FHC), sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), H syndrome, and pigmented hypertrichosis with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus syndrome (PHID). FHC described an autosomal recessive disease involving joint deformities, sensorineural hearing loss, and subsequent development of generalized lymphadenopathy and swellings in the eyelids that contain histiocytes (summary by Morgan et al., 2010). SHML, or familial Rosai-Dorfman disease, was described as a rare cause of lymph node enlargement in children, consisting of chronic massive enlargement of cervical lymph nodes frequently accompanied by fever, leukocytosis, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia. Extranodal sites were involved in approximately 25% of patients, including salivary glands, orbit, eyelid, spleen, and testes. The involvement of retropharyngeal lymphoid tissue sometimes caused snoring and sleep apnea (summary by Kismet et al., 2005). H syndrome was characterized by cutaneous hyperpigmentation and hypertrichosis, hepatosplenomegaly, heart anomalies, and hypogonadism; hearing loss was also found in about half of patients, and many had short stature. PHID was characterized by predominantly antibody-negative insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus associated with pigmented hypertrichosis and variable occurrence of other features of H syndrome, with hepatosplenomegaly occurring in about half of patients (Cliffe et al., 2009). Bolze et al. (2012) noted that mutations in the SLC29A3 gene (612373) had been implicated in H syndrome, PHID, FHC, and SHML, and that some patients presented a combination of features from 2 or more of these syndromes, leading to the suggestion that these phenotypes should be grouped together as 'SLC29A3 disorder.' Bolze et al. (2012) suggested that the histologic features of the lesions seemed to be the most uniform phenotype in these patients. In addition, the immunophenotype of infiltrating cells in H syndrome patients was shown to be the same as that seen in patients with the familial form of Rosai-Dorfman disease, further supporting the relationship between these disorders (Avitan-Hersh et al., 2011; Colmenero et al., 2012).
Familial hemiplegic migraine type 2
MedGen UID:
355962
Concept ID:
C1865322
Disease or Syndrome
Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) falls within the category of migraine with aura. In migraine with aura (including FHM) the neurologic symptoms of aura are unequivocally localizable to the cerebral cortex or brain stem and include visual disturbance (most common), sensory loss (e.g., numbness or paresthesias of the face or an extremity), and dysphasia (difficulty with speech). FHM must include motor involvement, such as hemiparesis (weakness of an extremity). Hemiparesis occurs with at least one other symptom during FHM aura. Neurologic deficits with FHM attacks can be prolonged for hours to days and may outlast the associated migrainous headache. FHM is often earlier in onset than typical migraine, frequently beginning in the first or second decade; the frequency of attacks tends to decrease with age. Approximately 40%-50% of families with CACNA1A-FHM have cerebellar signs ranging from nystagmus to progressive, usually late-onset mild ataxia.
Neuropathy, hereditary thermosensitive
MedGen UID:
355568
Concept ID:
C1865856
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary thermosensitive neuropathy is a rare, demyelinating, hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy characterized by reversible episodes of ascending muscle weakness, paresthesias and areflexia triggered by a febrile episode, with or without pressure palsy.
Malignant hyperthermia, susceptibility to, 5
MedGen UID:
356151
Concept ID:
C1866077
Finding
Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle calcium regulation associated with uncontrolled skeletal muscle hypermetabolism. Manifestations of malignant hyperthermia (MH) are precipitated by certain volatile anesthetics (i.e., halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, enflurane), either alone or in conjunction with a depolarizing muscle relaxant (specifically, succinylcholine). The triggering substances cause uncontrolled release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and may promote entry of extracellular calcium into the myoplasm, causing contracture of skeletal muscles, glycogenolysis, and increased cellular metabolism, resulting in production of heat and excess lactate. Affected individuals experience acidosis, hypercapnia, tachycardia, hyperthermia, muscle rigidity, compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis with subsequent increase in serum creatine kinase (CK) concentration, hyperkalemia with a risk for cardiac arrhythmia or even cardiac arrest, and myoglobinuria with a risk for renal failure. In nearly all cases, the first manifestations of MH (tachycardia and tachypnea) occur in the operating room; however, MH may also occur in the early postoperative period. There is mounting evidence that some individuals with MHS will also develop MH with exercise and/or on exposure to hot environments. Without proper and prompt treatment with dantrolene sodium, mortality is extremely high.
Bartter syndrome, type 1, antenatal
MedGen UID:
355727
Concept ID:
C1866495
Disease or Syndrome
Bartter syndrome refers to a group of disorders that are unified by autosomal recessive transmission of impaired salt reabsorption in the thick ascending loop of Henle with pronounced salt wasting, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, and hypercalciuria. Clinical disease results from defective renal reabsorption of sodium chloride in the thick ascending limb (TAL) of the Henle loop, where 30% of filtered salt is normally reabsorbed (Simon et al., 1997). Patients with antenatal forms of Bartter syndrome typically present with premature birth associated with polyhydramnios and low birth weight and may develop life-threatening dehydration in the neonatal period. Patients with classic Bartter syndrome (see BARTS3, 607364) present later in life and may be sporadically asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic (summary by Simon et al., 1996 and Fremont and Chan, 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bartter syndrome, see 607364.
Ragweed sensitivity
MedGen UID:
356768
Concept ID:
C1867394
Finding
Griscelli syndrome type 2
MedGen UID:
357030
Concept ID:
C1868679
Disease or Syndrome
Griscelli syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by unusually light (hypopigmented) skin and light silvery-gray hair starting in infancy. Researchers have identified three types of this disorder, which are distinguished by their genetic cause and pattern of signs and symptoms.\n\nGriscelli syndrome type 1 involves severe problems with brain function in addition to the distinctive skin and hair coloring. Affected individuals typically have delayed development, intellectual disability, seizures, weak muscle tone (hypotonia), and eye and vision abnormalities. Another condition called Elejalde disease has many of the same signs and symptoms, and some researchers have proposed that Griscelli syndrome type 1 and Elejalde disease are actually the same disorder.\n\nPeople with Griscelli syndrome type 2 have immune system abnormalities in addition to having hypopigmented skin and hair. Affected individuals are prone to recurrent infections. They also develop an immune condition called hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), in which the immune system produces too many activated immune cells called T-lymphocytes and macrophages (histiocytes). Overactivity of these cells can damage organs and tissues throughout the body, causing life-threatening complications if the condition is untreated. People with Griscelli syndrome type 2 do not have the neurological abnormalities of type 1.\n\nUnusually light skin and hair coloring are the only features of Griscelli syndrome type 3. People with this form of the disorder do not have neurological abnormalities or immune system problems.
Dystonia 12
MedGen UID:
358384
Concept ID:
C1868681
Disease or Syndrome
ATP1A3-related neurologic disorders represent a clinical continuum in which at least three distinct phenotypes have been delineated: rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP); alternating hemiplegia of childhood (ACH); and cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss (CAPOS). However, some affected individuals have intermediate phenotypes or only a few features that do not fit well into one of these major phenotypes. RDP has been characterized by: abrupt onset of dystonia over days to weeks with parkinsonism (primarily bradykinesia and postural instability); common bulbar involvement; and absence or minimal response to an adequate trial of L-dopa therapy, with few exceptions. Often fever, physiologic stress, or alcoholic binges trigger the onset of symptoms. After their initial appearance, symptoms often stabilize with little improvement; occasionally second episodes occur with abrupt worsening of symptoms. Rarely, affected individuals have reported a more gradual onset of symptoms over weeks to months. Anxiety, depression, and seizures have been reported. Age of onset ranges from four to 55 years, although a childhood variation of RDP with onset between ages nine and 14 months has been reported. AHC is a complex neurodevelopmental syndrome most frequently manifesting in infancy or early childhood with paroxysmal episodic neurologic dysfunction including alternating hemiparesis or dystonia, quadriparesis, seizure-like episodes, and oculomotor abnormalities. Episodes can last for minutes, hours, days, or even weeks. Remission of symptoms occurs with sleep and immediately after awakening. Over time, persistent neurologic deficits including oculomotor apraxia, ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, parkinsonism, and cognitive and behavioral dysfunction develop in the majority of those affected; more than 50% develop epilepsy in addition to their episodic movement disorder phenotype. CAPOS (cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss) syndrome is characterized by episodes of ataxic encephalopathy and/or weakness during and after a febrile illness. Onset is between ages six months and four years. Some acute symptoms resolve; progression of sensory losses and severity vary.
Sarcoidosis 1
MedGen UID:
394568
Concept ID:
C2697310
Finding
Anemia, nonspherocytic hemolytic, due to G6PD deficiency
MedGen UID:
403555
Concept ID:
C2720289
Disease or Syndrome
G6PD deficiency is the most common genetic cause of chronic and drug-, food-, or infection-induced hemolytic anemia. G6PD catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, which is the only NADPH-generation process in mature red cells; therefore, defense against oxidative damage is dependent on G6PD. Most G6PD-deficient patients are asymptomatic throughout their life, but G6PD deficiency can be life-threatening. The most common clinical manifestations of G6PD deficiency are neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia, which in most patients is triggered by an exogenous agent, e.g., primaquine or fava beans. Acute hemolysis is characterized by fatigue, back pain, anemia, and jaundice. Increased unconjugated bilirubin, lactate dehydrogenase, and reticulocytosis are markers of the disorder. The striking similarity between the areas where G6PD deficiency is common and Plasmodium falciparum malaria (see 611162) is endemic provided evidence that G6PD deficiency confers resistance against malaria (summary by Cappellini and Fiorelli, 2008).
Neuroblastoma 1
MedGen UID:
412713
Concept ID:
C2749485
Finding
Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
412743
Concept ID:
C2749604
Finding
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure caused by platelet thrombi in the microcirculation of the kidney and other organs. The onset of atypical HUS (aHUS) ranges from the neonatal period to adulthood. Genetic aHUS accounts for an estimated 60% of all aHUS. Individuals with genetic aHUS frequently experience relapse even after complete recovery following the presenting episode; 60% of genetic aHUS progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 5
MedGen UID:
416514
Concept ID:
C2751293
Disease or Syndrome
Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis-5 with or without microvillus inclusion disease (FHL5) is an autosomal recessive hyperinflammatory disorder characterized clinically by fever, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, coagulation abnormalities, and other laboratory findings. Some patients have neurologic symptoms due to inflammatory CNS disease. There is uncontrolled and ineffective proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes, NK cells, and macrophages that infiltrate multiple organs, including liver, spleen, lymph nodes, and the CNS. The phenotype is variable: some patients may present in early infancy with severe diarrhea, prior to the onset of typical FHL features, whereas others present later in childhood and have a more protracted course without diarrhea. The early-onset diarrhea is due to enteropathy reminiscent of microvillus inclusion disease (see MVID, 251850). The enteropathy, which often necessitates parenteral feeding, may be the most life-threatening issue even after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). More variable features include sensorineural hearing loss and hypogammaglobulinemia. Treatment with immunosuppressive drugs and chemotherapy can ameliorate signs and symptoms of FHL in some patients, but the only curative therapy for FHL is HSCT. HSCT is not curative for enteropathy associated with the disorder, despite hematologic and immunologic reconstitution (summary by Meeths et al., 2010; Pagel et al., 2012; Stepensky et al., 2013). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL, HLH), see 267700.
Malignant hyperthermia, susceptibility to, 1
MedGen UID:
443948
Concept ID:
C2930980
Finding
Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle calcium regulation associated with uncontrolled skeletal muscle hypermetabolism. Manifestations of malignant hyperthermia (MH) are precipitated by certain volatile anesthetics (i.e., halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, enflurane), either alone or in conjunction with a depolarizing muscle relaxant (specifically, succinylcholine). The triggering substances cause uncontrolled release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and may promote entry of extracellular calcium into the myoplasm, causing contracture of skeletal muscles, glycogenolysis, and increased cellular metabolism, resulting in production of heat and excess lactate. Affected individuals experience acidosis, hypercapnia, tachycardia, hyperthermia, muscle rigidity, compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis with subsequent increase in serum creatine kinase (CK) concentration, hyperkalemia with a risk for cardiac arrhythmia or even cardiac arrest, and myoglobinuria with a risk for renal failure. In nearly all cases, the first manifestations of MH (tachycardia and tachypnea) occur in the operating room; however, MH may also occur in the early postoperative period. There is mounting evidence that some individuals with MHS will also develop MH with exercise and/or on exposure to hot environments. Without proper and prompt treatment with dantrolene sodium, mortality is extremely high.
Malignant hyperthermia, susceptibility to, 2
MedGen UID:
419301
Concept ID:
C2930981
Finding
Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle calcium regulation associated with uncontrolled skeletal muscle hypermetabolism. Manifestations of malignant hyperthermia (MH) are precipitated by certain volatile anesthetics (i.e., halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, enflurane), either alone or in conjunction with a depolarizing muscle relaxant (specifically, succinylcholine). The triggering substances cause uncontrolled release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and may promote entry of extracellular calcium into the myoplasm, causing contracture of skeletal muscles, glycogenolysis, and increased cellular metabolism, resulting in production of heat and excess lactate. Affected individuals experience acidosis, hypercapnia, tachycardia, hyperthermia, muscle rigidity, compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis with subsequent increase in serum creatine kinase (CK) concentration, hyperkalemia with a risk for cardiac arrhythmia or even cardiac arrest, and myoglobinuria with a risk for renal failure. In nearly all cases, the first manifestations of MH (tachycardia and tachypnea) occur in the operating room; however, MH may also occur in the early postoperative period. There is mounting evidence that some individuals with MHS will also develop MH with exercise and/or on exposure to hot environments. Without proper and prompt treatment with dantrolene sodium, mortality is extremely high.
Malignant hyperthermia, susceptibility to, 3
MedGen UID:
418956
Concept ID:
C2930982
Finding
Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle calcium regulation associated with uncontrolled skeletal muscle hypermetabolism. Manifestations of malignant hyperthermia (MH) are precipitated by certain volatile anesthetics (i.e., halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, enflurane), either alone or in conjunction with a depolarizing muscle relaxant (specifically, succinylcholine). The triggering substances cause uncontrolled release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and may promote entry of extracellular calcium into the myoplasm, causing contracture of skeletal muscles, glycogenolysis, and increased cellular metabolism, resulting in production of heat and excess lactate. Affected individuals experience acidosis, hypercapnia, tachycardia, hyperthermia, muscle rigidity, compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis with subsequent increase in serum creatine kinase (CK) concentration, hyperkalemia with a risk for cardiac arrhythmia or even cardiac arrest, and myoglobinuria with a risk for renal failure. In nearly all cases, the first manifestations of MH (tachycardia and tachypnea) occur in the operating room; however, MH may also occur in the early postoperative period. There is mounting evidence that some individuals with MHS will also develop MH with exercise and/or on exposure to hot environments. Without proper and prompt treatment with dantrolene sodium, mortality is extremely high.
Classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency
MedGen UID:
424833
Concept ID:
C2936858
Congenital Abnormality
21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) is the most common cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), a family of autosomal recessive disorders involving impaired synthesis of cortisol from cholesterol by the adrenal cortex. In 21-OHD CAH, excessive adrenal androgen biosynthesis results in virilization in all individuals and salt wasting in some individuals. A classic form with severe enzyme deficiency and prenatal onset of virilization is distinguished from a non-classic form with mild enzyme deficiency and postnatal onset. The classic form is further divided into the simple virilizing form (~25% of affected individuals) and the salt-wasting form, in which aldosterone production is inadequate (=75% of individuals). Newborns with salt-wasting 21-OHD CAH are at risk for life-threatening salt-wasting crises. Individuals with the non-classic form of 21-OHD CAH present postnatally with signs of hyperandrogenism; females with the non-classic form are not virilized at birth.
Encephalopathy, acute, infection-induced, 4, susceptibility to
MedGen UID:
481790
Concept ID:
C3280160
Finding
Acute encephalopathy is a severe neurologic complication of an infection that usually occurs in children. It is characterized by a high-grade fever accompanied within 12 to 48 hours by febrile convulsions, often leading to coma, multiple-organ failure, brain edema, and high morbidity and mortality. The infections are usually viral, particularly influenza, although other viruses and even mycoplasma have been found to cause the disorder (summary by Chen et al., 2005; Shinohara et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of susceptibility to acute infection-induced encephalopathy, see 610551.
Granulomatosis with polyangiitis
MedGen UID:
811223
Concept ID:
C3495801
Disease or Syndrome
Granulomatosis with polyangiitis, formerly termed Wegener granulomatosis, is a systemic disease with a complex genetic background. It is characterized by necrotizing granulomatous inflammation of the upper and lower respiratory tract, glomerulonephritis, vasculitis, and the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmatic autoantibodies (ANCAs) in patient sera. These ANCAs are antibodies to a defined target antigen, proteinase-3 (PR3, PRTN3; 177020), which is present within primary azurophil granules of neutrophils (PMNs) and lysozymes of monocytes. On cytokine priming of PMNs, PR3 translocates to the cell surface, where PR3-ANCAs can interact with their antigens and activate PMNs. PMNs from patients with active GPA express PR3 on their surface, produce respiratory burst, and release proteolytic enzymes after activation with PR3-ANCAs. The consequence is a self-sustaining inflammatory process (Jagiello et al., 2004).
Neuropathy, hereditary sensory and autonomic, type VI
MedGen UID:
761278
Concept ID:
C3539003
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type VI is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neonatal hypotonia, respiratory and feeding difficulties, lack of psychomotor development, and autonomic abnormalities including labile cardiovascular function, lack of corneal reflexes leading to corneal scarring, areflexia, and absent axonal flare response after intradermal histamine injection (summary by Edvardson et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy, see HSAN1 (162400).
Periodic fever, menstrual cycle-dependent
MedGen UID:
766332
Concept ID:
C3553418
Disease or Syndrome
Women show menstrual cycle-dependent physiologic changes in relation to sex hormone levels. Because ovulation triggers a significant change in the hormonal milieu that is similar to local inflammation, a 0.5 to 1.0 degree Celsius increase in basal body temperature after ovulation is commonly associated with progesterone secretion and is believed to be triggered by the induction of several inflammatory cytokines. Rare menstrual cycle-dependent febrile episodes have been reported, some of which have shown a luteal-phase-dependent pattern (summary by Jiang et al., 2012).
Lymphoproliferative syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
767454
Concept ID:
C3554540
Disease or Syndrome
Lymphoproliferative syndrome-2, also known as CD27 deficiency, is an autosomal recessive immunodeficiency disorder associated with persistent symptomatic EBV viremia, hypogammaglobulinemia, and impairment in specific antibody function resulting from impaired T cell-dependent B-cell responses and T-cell dysfunction (summary by van Montfrans et al., 2012). The phenotype can vary significantly, from asymptomatic borderline-low hypogammaglobulinemia, to a full-blown symptomatic systemic inflammatory response with life-threatening EBV-related complications, including hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, a lymphoproliferative disorder, and malignant lymphoma requiring stem cell transplantation (summary by Salzer et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lymphoproliferative syndrome, see XLP1 (308240).
Congenital disorder of deglycosylation
MedGen UID:
815321
Concept ID:
C3808991
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with NGLY1-related congenital disorder of deglycosylation (NGLY1-CDDG) typically display a clinical tetrad of developmental delay / intellectual disability in the mild to profound range, hypo- or alacrima, elevated liver transaminases that may spontaneously resolve in childhood, and a complex hyperkinetic movement disorder that can include choreiform, athetoid, dystonic, myoclonic, action tremor, and dysmetric movements. About half of affected individuals will develop clinical seizures. Other findings may include obstructive and/or central sleep apnea, oral motor defects that affect feeding ability, auditory neuropathy, constipation, scoliosis, and peripheral neuropathy.
Polyarteritis nodosa, childhoood-onset
MedGen UID:
854497
Concept ID:
C3887654
Disease or Syndrome
Adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency (DADA2) is a complex systemic autoinflammatory disorder in which vasculopathy/vasculitis, dysregulated immune function, and/or hematologic abnormalities may predominate. Inflammatory features include intermittent fevers, rash (often livedo racemosa/reticularis), and musculoskeletal involvement (myalgia/arthralgia, arthritis, myositis). Vasculitis, which usually begins before age ten years, may manifest as early-onset ischemic (lacunar) and/or hemorrhagic strokes, or as cutaneous or systemic polyarteritis nodosa. Hypertension and hepatosplenomegaly are often found. More severe involvement may lead to progressive central neurologic deficits (dysarthria, ataxia, cranial nerve palsies, cognitive impairment) or to ischemic injury to the kidney, intestine, and/or digits. Dysregulation of immune function can lead to immunodeficiency or autoimmunity of varying severity; lymphadenopathy may be present and some affected individuals have had lymphoproliferative disease. Hematologic disorders may begin early in life or in late adulthood, and can include lymphopenia, neutropenia, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, or pancytopenia. Of note, both interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic variability (e.g., in age of onset, frequency and severity of manifestations) can be observed; also, individuals with biallelic ADA2 pathogenic variants may remain asymptomatic until adulthood or may never develop clinical manifestations of DADA2.
Disseminated atypical mycobacterial infection
MedGen UID:
860386
Concept ID:
C4011949
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-27A results from autosomal recessive (AR) IFNGR1 deficiency. Patients with complete IFNGR1 deficiency have a severe clinical phenotype characterized by early and often fatal mycobacterial infections. The disorder can thus be categorized as a form of mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD). bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and environmental mycobacteria are the most frequent pathogens, and infection typically begins before the age of 3 years. Plasma from patients with complete AR IFNGR1 deficiency usually contains large amounts of IFNG (147570), and their cells do not respond to IFNG in vitro. In contrast, cells from patients with partial AR IFNGR1 deficiency, which is caused by a specific mutation in IFNGR1, retain residual responses to high IFNG concentrations. Patients with partial AR IFNGR1 deficiency are susceptible to BCG and environmental mycobacteria, but they have a milder clinical disease and better prognosis than patients with complete AR IFNGR1 deficiency. The clinical features of children with complete AR IFNGR1 deficiency are usually more severe than those in individuals with AD IFNGR1 deficiency (IMD27B), and mycobacterial infection often occurs earlier (mean age of 1.3 years vs 13.4 years), with patients having shorter mean disease-free survival. Salmonellosis is present in about 5% of patients with AR or AD IFNGR1 deficiency, and other infections have been reported in single patients (review by Al-Muhsen and Casanova, 2008).
Autoinflammation with infantile enterocolitis
MedGen UID:
863504
Concept ID:
C4015067
Disease or Syndrome
Autoinflammation with infantile enterocolitis is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by onset of recurrent flares of autoinflammation in early infancy. Affected individuals tend to have poor overall growth and gastrointestinal symptoms in infancy associated with laboratory evidence of activated inflammation. This initial presentation is followed by recurrent febrile episodes with splenomegaly and sometimes hematologic disturbances, arthralgias, or myalgias. The disorder results from overactivation of an arm of the immune response system (Romberg et al., 2014; Canna et al., 2014).
Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
863713
Concept ID:
C4015276
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency 32b
MedGen UID:
865178
Concept ID:
C4016741
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-32B is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections resulting from variable defects in immune cell development or function, including monocytes, dendritic cells, and natural killer (NK) cells. Patients have particular susceptibility to viral disease (summary by Mace et al., 2017).
PERCHING syndrome
MedGen UID:
934709
Concept ID:
C4310742
Disease or Syndrome
PERCHING syndrome is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by global developmental delay, dysmorphic facial features, feeding and respiratory difficulties with poor overall growth, axial hypotonia, and joint contractures. The features are variable, even within families, and may also include retinitis pigmentosa, cardiac or genitourinary anomalies, and abnormal sweating. Each letter of the PERCHING acronym represents 2 important phenotypic elements: Postural and Palatal abnormalities; Exophthalmos and Enteral-tube dependency/feeding issues; Respiratory distress and Retinitis pigmentosa; Contractures and Camptodactyly; Hypertelorism and Hirsutism; Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR)/growth failure and Intellectual disability/developmental delay; Nevus flammeus and Neurologic malformations; and facial Gestalt/grimacing and Genitourinary abnormalities (Jeffries et al., 2019). Death in infancy or early childhood often occurs, although survival to the third decade has been reported. Some of the features, such as contractures, dysmorphic craniofacial features, and severe feeding difficulties, are reminiscent of Bohring-Opitz syndrome (605039) (summary by Kanthi et al., 2019 and Buers et al., 2020).
Deafness, autosomal dominant 34, with or without inflammation
MedGen UID:
1626346
Concept ID:
C4521680
Disease or Syndrome
DFNA34 is an autosomal dominant form of postlingual, slowly progressive sensorineural hearing loss with variable severity and variable additional features. Some patients have pure hearing loss without significant additional features, whereas some patients have features of an autoinflammatory disorder with systemic manifestations, including periodic fevers, arthralgias, and episodic urticaria. The disorder results from abnormally increased activation of the inflammatory pathway, and treatment with an IL1 receptor antagonist (see 147679) may be effective if started early (summary by Nakanishi et al., 2017).
Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1647324
Concept ID:
C4551895
Disease or Syndrome
Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome is characterized clinically by recurrent attacks of a maculopapular rash associated with arthralgias, myalgias, fever and chills, and swelling of the extremities after exposure to cold. Despite the first description of 'cold urticaria' (Kile and Rusk, 1940) the rash in most patients is nonpruritic and nonurticarial. Rarely, some patients may also develop late-onset renal amyloidosis (Hoffman et al., 2000). Overlapping syndromes also caused by mutation in the NLRP3 gene include Muckle-Wells syndrome (CAPS2; 191900), which has a high frequency of amyloidosis and late-onset sensorineural deafness, and chronic neurologic cutaneous and articular syndrome (CINCA, CAPS3; 607115), which shows earlier onset and a more severe phenotype. Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome See also FCAS2 (611762), caused by mutation in the NLRP12 gene (609648) on chromosome 19q13; FCAS3 (614468), caused by mutation in the PLCG2 gene (600220) on chromosome 16q23; and FCAS4 (616115), caused by mutation in the NLRC4 gene (606831) on chromosome 2p22.
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1648482
Concept ID:
C4747989
Disease or Syndrome
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome-2 is an autosomal dominant disorder with onset in early infancy. Affected individuals develop severe inflammatory neutrophilic dermatitis, autoimmunity, and variable immunodeficiency (summary by Poli et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PRAAS, see PRAAS1 (256040).
Immunodeficiency 60
MedGen UID:
1681890
Concept ID:
C5193072
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-60 (IMD60) is an autosomal dominant primary immunologic disorder characterized by inflammatory bowel disease and recurrent sinopulmonary infections. The age at symptom onset is highly variable, ranging from infancy to mid-adulthood. Laboratory studies show dysregulation of both B and T cells, with variably decreased immunoglobulin production, decreased T-regulatory cells, and overall impaired lymphocyte maturation (summary by Afzali et al., 2017).
Hypotonia, hypoventilation, impaired intellectual development, dysautonomia, epilepsy, and eye abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1672905
Concept ID:
C5193124
Disease or Syndrome
Hypotonia, hypoventilation, impaired intellectual development, dysautonomia, epilepsy, and eye abnormalities (HIDEA) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental syndrome characterized by global developmental delay, poor or absent speech, hypotonia, variable ocular movement and visual abnormalities, and respiratory difficulties, including hypoventilation, and sleep apnea. Patients may have significant breathing problems during respiratory infections that may lead to early death (summary by Rahikkala et al., 2019).
Autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease 5
MedGen UID:
1710326
Concept ID:
C5394542
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease-5 (CGD5) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by onset of recurrent infections and severe colitis in the first decade of life. Patients often present with features of inflammatory bowel disease and may show granulomata on biopsy. Patients are particularly susceptible to catalase-positive organisms, including Burkholderia cepacia, Legionella, and Candida albicans. Some patients may develop autoinflammatory symptoms, including recurrent fever in the absence of infection, hemolytic anemia, and lymphopenia. Additional features may include short stature, viral infections, cutaneous abscesses, pulmonary infections, and lymphadenitis. Hematopoietic bone marrow transplant is curative. The disorder results from impaired oxidative burst via the NAPDH oxidative complex in macrophages and neutrophils (summary by Arnadottir et al., 2018 and Thomas et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CGD, see the X-linked form (CGDX; 306400).
Immunodeficiency 69
MedGen UID:
1735911
Concept ID:
C5436498
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-69 (IMD69) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by increased susceptibility to disseminated mycobacterial infection, including after BCG (bacille Calmette-Guerin) vaccination. Affected individuals develop fever, hepatosplenomegaly, leukocytosis, and thrombocytosis during the acute infection. There appears to be normal immunologic function against other pathogens, including viruses and bacteria. Immunologic work-up shows normal parameters, but patient T and NK cells fail to produce gamma-interferon (IFNG) when stimulated in vitro (summary by Kerner et al., 2020). IMD69 is a form of mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) (see, e.g., IMD27A; 209950).

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Can Ö, Kıyan GS, Yalçınlı S
Am J Emerg Med 2021 Aug;46:102-106. Epub 2021 Mar 3 doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2021.02.057. PMID: 33740568
Shaker R, Arabi M, Khafaja S, Fayad D, Casals AA, Lteif M, Shamseddine S, Taqa MA, Charafeddine F, Rassi IE, Al-Halees Z, Bitar F, Hanna-Wakim R, Dbaibo G
World J Pediatr Congenit Heart Surg 2021 Jan;12(1):55-60. doi: 10.1177/2150135120956995. PMID: 33407033
Eroglu N, Erduran E, Reis GP, Bahadır A
Support Care Cancer 2021 Apr;29(4):1859-1862. Epub 2020 Aug 12 doi: 10.1007/s00520-020-05670-z. PMID: 32789623
AlAzmi A, Jastaniah W, AlDabbagh M, Elimam N
J Oncol Pharm Pract 2021 Apr;27(3):560-569. Epub 2020 May 31 doi: 10.1177/1078155220925161. PMID: 32476589
Akiyama Y, Morioka S, Wakimoto Y, Kawashima A, Kanda K, Okuhama A, Suzuki T, Miyazato Y, Nomoto H, Ide S, Nakamoto T, Nakamura K, Ota M, Moriyama Y, Takaya S, Yamada K, Taguchi M, Sugito E, Izuka S, Ishiguro K, Kobayashi T, Miyake W, Kubota S, Ishikane M, Kinoshita N, Yamamoto K, Ujiie M, Kutsuna S, Hayakawa K, Saito S, Ohmagari N
Intern Med 2020 Dec 15;59(24):3131-3133. Epub 2020 Nov 2 doi: 10.2169/internalmedicine.5614-20. PMID: 33132334Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Ogata T, Murooka M, Akashi M, Ishitsuka A, Miyazaki A, Osawa S, Ishikawa K, Tanaka-Taya K, Uehara R
BMC Infect Dis 2021 May 15;21(1):442. doi: 10.1186/s12879-021-06158-9. PMID: 33992076Free PMC Article
Murai Y, Kawasuji H, Takegoshi Y, Kaneda M, Kimoto K, Ueno A, Miyajima Y, Kawago K, Fukui Y, Ogami C, Sakamaki I, Tsuji Y, Morinaga Y, Yamamoto Y
Int J Infect Dis 2021 May;106:33-35. Epub 2021 Mar 18 doi: 10.1016/j.ijid.2021.03.048. PMID: 33746092Free PMC Article
Grünebaum A, Chervenak FA, McCullough LB, Dudenhausen JW, Bornstein E, Mackowiak PA
J Perinat Med 2021 Mar 26;49(3):255-261. Epub 2020 Dec 24 doi: 10.1515/jpm-2020-0546. PMID: 33554570
Akiyama Y, Morioka S, Wakimoto Y, Kawashima A, Kanda K, Okuhama A, Suzuki T, Miyazato Y, Nomoto H, Ide S, Nakamoto T, Nakamura K, Ota M, Moriyama Y, Takaya S, Yamada K, Taguchi M, Sugito E, Izuka S, Ishiguro K, Kobayashi T, Miyake W, Kubota S, Ishikane M, Kinoshita N, Yamamoto K, Ujiie M, Kutsuna S, Hayakawa K, Saito S, Ohmagari N
Intern Med 2020 Dec 15;59(24):3131-3133. Epub 2020 Nov 2 doi: 10.2169/internalmedicine.5614-20. PMID: 33132334Free PMC Article
Egloff C, Sibiude J, Couffignal C, Mandelbrot L, Picone O
J Gynecol Obstet Hum Reprod 2020 Nov;49(9):101899. Epub 2020 Aug 24 doi: 10.1016/j.jogoh.2020.101899. PMID: 32853830Free PMC Article

Therapy

Cann SAH
Am J Med Sci 2021 Apr;361(4):420-426. Epub 2021 Jan 9 doi: 10.1016/j.amjms.2021.01.004. PMID: 33781387Free PMC Article
Murai Y, Kawasuji H, Takegoshi Y, Kaneda M, Kimoto K, Ueno A, Miyajima Y, Kawago K, Fukui Y, Ogami C, Sakamaki I, Tsuji Y, Morinaga Y, Yamamoto Y
Int J Infect Dis 2021 May;106:33-35. Epub 2021 Mar 18 doi: 10.1016/j.ijid.2021.03.048. PMID: 33746092Free PMC Article
Can Ö, Kıyan GS, Yalçınlı S
Am J Emerg Med 2021 Aug;46:102-106. Epub 2021 Mar 3 doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2021.02.057. PMID: 33740568
Eroglu N, Erduran E, Reis GP, Bahadır A
Support Care Cancer 2021 Apr;29(4):1859-1862. Epub 2020 Aug 12 doi: 10.1007/s00520-020-05670-z. PMID: 32789623
AlAzmi A, Jastaniah W, AlDabbagh M, Elimam N
J Oncol Pharm Pract 2021 Apr;27(3):560-569. Epub 2020 May 31 doi: 10.1177/1078155220925161. PMID: 32476589

Prognosis

Yu Y, Pu J, Wu T, Hu L
Medicine (Baltimore) 2021 Aug 13;100(32):e26485. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000026485. PMID: 34397870Free PMC Article
Shaker R, Arabi M, Khafaja S, Fayad D, Casals AA, Lteif M, Shamseddine S, Taqa MA, Charafeddine F, Rassi IE, Al-Halees Z, Bitar F, Hanna-Wakim R, Dbaibo G
World J Pediatr Congenit Heart Surg 2021 Jan;12(1):55-60. doi: 10.1177/2150135120956995. PMID: 33407033
Martin D, Wachtmeister J, Ludwigs K, Jenetzky E
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak 2020 Oct 1;20(1):249. doi: 10.1186/s12911-020-01269-w. PMID: 33004050Free PMC Article
Durocher J, Aguirre JD, Dzuba IG, Mirta Morales E, Carroli G, Esquivel J, Martin R, Berecoechea C, Winikoff B
Trop Med Int Health 2020 Jun;25(6):714-722. Epub 2020 Apr 16 doi: 10.1111/tmi.13389. PMID: 32155681Free PMC Article
Charlier C, Perrodeau E, Levallois C, Cachina T, Dommergues M, Salomon LJ, Azria E, Goffinet F, Ravaud P, Lecuit M
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis 2020 May;39(5):999-1002. Epub 2020 Jan 18 doi: 10.1007/s10096-019-03809-3. PMID: 31955353

Clinical prediction guides

Murai Y, Kawasuji H, Takegoshi Y, Kaneda M, Kimoto K, Ueno A, Miyajima Y, Kawago K, Fukui Y, Ogami C, Sakamaki I, Tsuji Y, Morinaga Y, Yamamoto Y
Int J Infect Dis 2021 May;106:33-35. Epub 2021 Mar 18 doi: 10.1016/j.ijid.2021.03.048. PMID: 33746092Free PMC Article
Eroglu N, Erduran E, Reis GP, Bahadır A
Support Care Cancer 2021 Apr;29(4):1859-1862. Epub 2020 Aug 12 doi: 10.1007/s00520-020-05670-z. PMID: 32789623
AlAzmi A, Jastaniah W, AlDabbagh M, Elimam N
J Oncol Pharm Pract 2021 Apr;27(3):560-569. Epub 2020 May 31 doi: 10.1177/1078155220925161. PMID: 32476589
Alaje EO, Udoh EE, Akande PA, Odey FA, Meremikwu MM
Pan Afr Med J 2020;36:350. Epub 2020 Aug 26 doi: 10.11604/pamj.2020.36.350.21393. PMID: 33224416Free PMC Article
Akiyama Y, Morioka S, Wakimoto Y, Kawashima A, Kanda K, Okuhama A, Suzuki T, Miyazato Y, Nomoto H, Ide S, Nakamoto T, Nakamura K, Ota M, Moriyama Y, Takaya S, Yamada K, Taguchi M, Sugito E, Izuka S, Ishiguro K, Kobayashi T, Miyake W, Kubota S, Ishikane M, Kinoshita N, Yamamoto K, Ujiie M, Kutsuna S, Hayakawa K, Saito S, Ohmagari N
Intern Med 2020 Dec 15;59(24):3131-3133. Epub 2020 Nov 2 doi: 10.2169/internalmedicine.5614-20. PMID: 33132334Free PMC Article

Recent systematic reviews

Islam MA, Kundu S, Alam SS, Hossan T, Kamal MA, Hassan R
PLoS One 2021;16(4):e0249788. Epub 2021 Apr 6 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0249788. PMID: 33822812Free PMC Article
Buss I, Genton B, D'Acremont V
J Travel Med 2020 Dec 23;27(8) doi: 10.1093/jtm/taaa207. PMID: 33146395Free PMC Article
Moreira J, Barros J, Lapouble O, Lacerda MVG, Felger I, Brasil P, Dittrich S, Siqueira AM
BMC Med 2020 Sep 21;18(1):294. doi: 10.1186/s12916-020-01746-z. PMID: 32951589Free PMC Article
Villarejo-Rodríguez MG, Rodríguez-Martín B
Nurs Health Sci 2020 Jun;22(2):162-170. Epub 2019 Aug 26 doi: 10.1111/nhs.12639. PMID: 31452312
Clericetti CM, Milani GP, Bianchetti MG, Simonetti GD, Fossali EF, Balestra AM, Bozzini MA, Agostoni C, Lava SAG
Acta Paediatr 2019 Aug;108(8):1393-1397. Epub 2019 Feb 27 doi: 10.1111/apa.14739. PMID: 30716166

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