U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

Dyskinesia

MedGen UID:
8514
Concept ID:
C0013384
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Abnormal Movement; Abnormal Movements; Dyskinesias; Movement, Abnormal; Movements, Abnormal
SNOMED CT: Dyskinesia (9748009)
 
HPO: HP:0100660

Definition

A movement disorder which consists of effects including diminished voluntary movements and the presence of involuntary movements. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVDyskinesia

Conditions with this feature

Sulfite oxidase deficiency
MedGen UID:
78695
Concept ID:
C0268624
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency ranges from classic early-onset (severe) disease to late-onset (mild) disease. Classic ISOD is characterized in the first few hours to days of life by intractable seizures, feeding difficulties, and rapidly progressive encephalopathy manifest as abnormal tone (especially opisthotonus, spastic quadriplegia, and pyramidal signs) followed by progressive microcephaly and profound intellectual disability. Lens subluxation or dislocation, another characteristic finding, may be evident after the newborn period. Children usually die during the first few months of life. Late-onset ISOD manifests between ages six and 18 months and is characterized by ectopia lentis (variably present), developmental delay/regression, movement disorder characterized by dystonia and choreoathetosis, ataxia, and (rarely) acute hemiplegia as a result of metabolic stroke. The clinical course may be progressive or episodic. In the episodic form encephalopathy, dystonia, choreoathetosis, and/or ataxia are intermittent.
Congenital defect of folate absorption
MedGen UID:
83348
Concept ID:
C0342705
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM) is characterized by folate deficiency due to impaired intestinal folate absorption and impaired folate transport into the central nervous system. Findings include poor feeding, failure to thrive, and anemia. There can be leukopenia and thrombocytopenia, diarrhea and/or oral mucositis, hypoimmunoglobulinemia, and other immunologic dysfunction resulting in infections, most often Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Neurologic manifestations include developmental delays, cognitive and motor disorders, behavioral disorders, and seizures.
McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
140765
Concept ID:
C0398568
Disease or Syndrome
McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome (designated as MLS throughout this review) is a multisystem disorder with central nervous system (CNS), neuromuscular, cardiovascular, and hematologic manifestations in males: CNS manifestations are a neurodegenerative basal ganglia disease including movement disorders, cognitive alterations, and psychiatric symptoms. Neuromuscular manifestations include a (mostly subclinical) sensorimotor axonopathy and muscle weakness or atrophy of different degrees. Cardiac manifestations include dilated cardiomyopathy, atrial fibrillation, and tachyarrhythmia. Hematologically, MLS is defined as a specific blood group phenotype (named after the first proband, Hugh McLeod) that results from absent expression of the Kx erythrocyte antigen and weakened expression of Kell blood group antigens. The hematologic manifestations are red blood cell acanthocytosis and compensated hemolysis. Alloantibodies in the Kell and Kx blood group system can cause strong reactions to transfusions of incompatible blood and severe anemia in affected male newborns of Kell-negative mothers. Females heterozygous for XK pathogenic variants have mosaicism for the Kell and Kx blood group antigens. Although they usually lack CNS and neuromuscular manifestations, some heterozygous females may develop clinical manifestations including chorea or late-onset cognitive decline.
Early-onset parkinsonism-intellectual disability syndrome
MedGen UID:
208674
Concept ID:
C0796195
Disease or Syndrome
Waisman syndrome is an X-linked neurologic disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, impaired intellectual development, and early-onset Parkinson disease (summary by Wilson et al., 2014).
Dystonia 9
MedGen UID:
371427
Concept ID:
C1832855
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1 DS) is now known to be a continuum that includes the classic phenotype as well as paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia and epilepsy (previously known as dystonia 18 [DYT18]) and paroxysmal choreoathetosis with spasticity (previously known as dystonia 9 [DYT9]), atypical childhood absence epilepsy, myoclonic astatic epilepsy, and paroxysmal non-epileptic findings including intermittent ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, and alternating hemiplegia. The classic phenotype is characterized by infantile-onset seizures, delayed neurologic development, acquired microcephaly, and complex movement disorders. Seizures in classic early-onset Glut1 DS begin before age six months. Several seizure types occur: generalized tonic or clonic, focal, myoclonic, atypical absence, atonic, and unclassified. In some infants, apneic episodes and abnormal episodic eye-head movements similar to opsoclonus may precede the onset of seizures. The frequency, severity, and type of seizures vary among affected individuals and are not related to disease severity. Cognitive impairment, ranging from learning disabilities to severe intellectual disability, is typical. The complex movement disorder, characterized by ataxia, dystonia, and chorea, may occur in any combination and may be continuous, paroxysmal, or continual with fluctuations in severity influenced by environmental factors such as fasting or with infectious stress. Symptoms often improve substantially when a ketogenic diet is started.
Generalized epilepsy-paroxysmal dyskinesia syndrome
MedGen UID:
332144
Concept ID:
C1836173
Disease or Syndrome
gene (chromosome 10q22), encoding the alpha subunit of the BK channel. Transmission is autosomal dominant.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 26
MedGen UID:
373138
Concept ID:
C1836632
Disease or Syndrome
SPG26 is an autosomal recessive form of complicated spastic paraplegia characterized by onset in the first 2 decades of life of gait abnormalities due to lower limb spasticity and muscle weakness. Some patients have upper limb involvement. Additional features include intellectual disability, peripheral neuropathy, dysarthria, cerebellar signs, extrapyramidal signs, and cortical atrophy. The disorder is slowly progressive (summary by Boukhris et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive SPG, see SPG5A (270800).
Mitochondrial complex I deficiency
MedGen UID:
374101
Concept ID:
C1838979
Disease or Syndrome
Isolated complex I deficiency is a rare inborn error of metabolism due to mutations in nuclear or mitochondrial genes encoding subunits or assembly factors of the human mitochondrial complex I (NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase) and is characterized by a wide range of manifestations including marked and often fatal lactic acidosis, cardiomyopathy, leukoencephalopathy, pure myopathy and hepatopathy with tubulopathy. Among the numerous clinical phenotypes observed are Leigh syndrome, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and MELAS syndrome (see these terms).
Childhood onset GLUT1 deficiency syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
330866
Concept ID:
C1842534
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1 DS) is now known to be a continuum that includes the classic phenotype as well as paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia and epilepsy (previously known as dystonia 18 [DYT18]) and paroxysmal choreoathetosis with spasticity (previously known as dystonia 9 [DYT9]), atypical childhood absence epilepsy, myoclonic astatic epilepsy, and paroxysmal non-epileptic findings including intermittent ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, and alternating hemiplegia. The classic phenotype is characterized by infantile-onset seizures, delayed neurologic development, acquired microcephaly, and complex movement disorders. Seizures in classic early-onset Glut1 DS begin before age six months. Several seizure types occur: generalized tonic or clonic, focal, myoclonic, atypical absence, atonic, and unclassified. In some infants, apneic episodes and abnormal episodic eye-head movements similar to opsoclonus may precede the onset of seizures. The frequency, severity, and type of seizures vary among affected individuals and are not related to disease severity. Cognitive impairment, ranging from learning disabilities to severe intellectual disability, is typical. The complex movement disorder, characterized by ataxia, dystonia, and chorea, may occur in any combination and may be continuous, paroxysmal, or continual with fluctuations in severity influenced by environmental factors such as fasting or with infectious stress. Symptoms often improve substantially when a ketogenic diet is started.
Muscular hypertonia, lethal
MedGen UID:
342600
Concept ID:
C1850827
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson disease 7
MedGen UID:
344049
Concept ID:
C1853445
Disease or Syndrome
Any Parkinson disease in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PARK7 gene.
Neuroferritinopathy
MedGen UID:
381211
Concept ID:
C1853578
Disease or Syndrome
Neuroferritinopathy typically presents with progressive adult-onset chorea or dystonia affecting one or two limbs, and subtle cognitive deficits. The movement disorder affects additional limbs within five to ten years and becomes more generalized within 20 years. When present, asymmetry remains throughout the course of the disorder. The majority of individuals develop a characteristic orofacial action-specific dystonia related to speech that leads to dysarthrophonia. Frontalis overactivity and orolingual dyskinesia are common. Cognitive deficits and behavioral issues become major problems with time.
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia 5
MedGen UID:
346805
Concept ID:
C1858379
Disease or Syndrome
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) – previously referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) – is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle, and it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years).
Episodic kinesigenic dyskinesia 2
MedGen UID:
410022
Concept ID:
C1970238
Disease or Syndrome
A dystonia characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance of recurrent brief involuntary hyperkinesias triggered by sudden movements that has material basis in variation in the chromosome region 16q13-q22.1.
Dystonia 16
MedGen UID:
436979
Concept ID:
C2677567
Disease or Syndrome
Dystonia 16 is one of many forms of dystonia, which is a group of conditions characterized by involuntary movements, twisting (torsion) and tensing of various muscles, and unusual positioning of affected body parts. Dystonia 16 can appear at any age from infancy through adulthood, although it most often begins in childhood.\n\nThe signs and symptoms of dystonia 16 vary among people with the condition. In many affected individuals, the disorder first affects muscles in one or both arms or legs. Tensing (contraction) of the muscles often sets the affected limb in an abnormal position, which may be painful and can lead to difficulty performing tasks, such as walking. In others, muscles in the neck are affected first, causing the head to be pulled backward and positioned with the chin in the air (retrocollis).\n\nIn dystonia 16, muscles of the jaw, lips, and tongue are also commonly affected (oromandibular dystonia), causing difficulty opening and closing the mouth and problems with swallowing and speech. Speech can also be affected by involuntary tensing of the muscles that control the vocal cords (laryngeal dystonia), resulting in a quiet, breathy voice or an inability to speak clearly. Dystonia 16 gradually gets worse, eventually involving muscles in most parts of the body.\n\nSome people with dystonia 16 develop a pattern of movement abnormalities known as parkinsonism. These abnormalities include unusually slow movement (bradykinesia), muscle rigidity, tremors, and an inability to hold the body upright and balanced (postural instability). In dystonia 16, parkinsonism is relatively mild if it develops at all.\n\nThe signs and symptoms of dystonia 16 usually do not get better when treated with drugs that are typically used for movement disorders.
Combined immunodeficiency with faciooculoskeletal anomalies
MedGen UID:
442377
Concept ID:
C2750068
Disease or Syndrome
Roifman-Chitayat syndrome (ROCHIS) is an autosomal recessive digenic disorder characterized by global developmental delay, variable neurologic features such as seizures, ataxia, and optic atrophy, dysmorphic facial features, distal skeletal anomalies, and combined immunodeficiency manifest as recurrent infections (summary by Sharfe et al., 2018).
Rett syndrome, congenital variant
MedGen UID:
462055
Concept ID:
C3150705
Disease or Syndrome
The congenital variant of Rett syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with features of classic Rett syndrome (RTT; 312750), but earlier onset in the first months of life. Classic Rett syndrome shows later onset and is caused by mutation in the MECP2 gene (300005).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 6
MedGen UID:
462761
Concept ID:
C3151411
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
GRIN2B-related neurodevelopmental disorder is characterized by mild to profound developmental delay / intellectual disability (DD/ID) in all affected individuals. Muscle tone abnormalities (spasticity and/or hypotonia, occasionally associated with feeding difficulties), as well as epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) / behavioral issues, are common. Other infantile- or childhood-onset findings include microcephaly; dystonic, dyskinetic, or choreiform movement disorder; and/or cortical visual impairment. Brain MRI reveals a malformation of cortical development in a minority of affected individuals. To date, fewer than 100 individuals with GRIN2B-related neurodevelopmental disorder have been reported.
Parkinson disease 17
MedGen UID:
481763
Concept ID:
C3280133
Disease or Syndrome
VPS35-related Parkinson disease (VPS35-PD) is defined as Parkinson disease caused by heterozygous VPS35 pathogenic variants. Currently, the only known VPS35 variant with confirmed pathogenicity is c.1858G>A (p.Asp620Asn). Except for a younger age of onset, VPS35-PD is clinically indistinguishable from Parkinson disease of unknown cause (so-called sporadic Parkinson disease). Variability among 50 individuals reported with molecularly confirmed VPS35-PD includes age of onset (mean: 51.0±8.7 years; range: 34-68 years), Parkinson subtype (tremor, akinetic rigid, mixed), first motor symptom, course of the disease (unilateral onset and slow disease progression are typical; dyskinesia and motor fluctuations may occur), and presence/absence of neuropsychiatric manifestations (including depression, schizophrenia, learning difficulties, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 8
MedGen UID:
481912
Concept ID:
C3280282
Disease or Syndrome
GRIN1-related neurodevelopmental disorder (GRIN1-NDD) is characterized by mild-to-profound developmental delay / intellectual disability (DD/ID) in all affected individuals. Other common manifestations are epilepsy, muscular hypotonia, movement disorders, spasticity, feeding difficulties, and behavior problems. A subset of individuals show a malformation of cortical development consisting of extensive and diffuse bilateral polymicrogyria. To date, 72 individuals with GRIN1-NDD have been reported.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 1
MedGen UID:
483052
Concept ID:
C3463992
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-1 (DEE1) is a severe form of epilepsy characterized by frequent tonic seizures or spasms beginning in infancy with a specific EEG finding of suppression-burst patterns, characterized by high-voltage bursts alternating with almost flat suppression phases. Approximately 75% of DEE1 patients progress to tonic spasms with clustering, arrest of psychomotor development, and hypsarrhythmia on EEG (Kato et al., 2007). DEE1 is part of a phenotypic spectrum of disorders caused by mutation in the ARX gene comprising a nearly continuous series of developmental disorders ranging from lissencephaly (LISX2; 300215) to Proud syndrome (300004) to infantile spasms without brain malformations (DEE) to syndromic (309510) and nonsyndromic (300419) mental retardation. Although males with ARX mutations are often more severely affected, female mutation carriers may also be affected (Kato et al., 2004; Wallerstein et al., 2008). Reviews Deprez et al. (2009) reviewed the genetics of epilepsy syndromes starting in the first year of life and included a diagnostic algorithm. Genetic Heterogeneity of Developmental and Epileptic Encephalopathy Also see DEE2 (300672), caused by mutation in the CDKL5 gene (300203); DEE3 (609304), caused by mutation in the SLC25A22 gene (609302); DEE4 (612164), caused by mutation in the STXBP1 gene (602926); DEE5 (613477), caused by mutation in the SPTAN1 gene (182810); DEE6A (607208), also known as Dravet syndrome, caused by mutation in the SCN1A gene (182389); DEE6B (619317), also caused by mutation in the SCN1A gene; DEE7 (613720), caused by mutation in the KCNQ2 gene (602235); DEE8 (300607), caused by mutation in the ARHGEF9 gene (300429); DEE9 (300088), caused by mutation in the PCDH19 gene (300460); DEE10 (613402), caused by mutation in the PNKP gene (605610); DEE11 (613721), caused by mutation in the SCN2A gene (182390); DEE12 (613722), caused by mutation in the PLCB1 gene (607120); DEE13 (614558), caused by mutation in the SCN8A gene (600702); DEE14 (614959), caused by mutation in the KCNT1 gene (608167); DEE15 (615006), caused by mutation in the ST3GAL3 gene (606494); DEE16 (615338), caused by mutation in the TBC1D24 gene (613577); DEE17 (615473), caused by mutation in the GNAO1 gene (139311); DEE18 (615476), caused by mutation in the SZT2 gene (615463); DEE19 (615744), caused by mutation in the GABRA1 gene (137160); DEE20 (300868), caused by mutation in the PIGA gene (311770); DEE21 (615833), caused by mutation in the NECAP1 gene (611623); DEE22 (300896), caused by mutation in the SLC35A2 gene (314375); DEE23 (615859), caused by mutation in the DOCK7 gene (615730); DEE24 (615871), caused by mutation in the HCN1 gene (602780); DEE25 (615905), caused by mutation in the SLC13A5 gene (608305); DEE26 (616056), caused by mutation in the KCNB1 gene (600397); DEE27 (616139), caused by mutation in the GRIN2B gene (138252); DEE28 (616211), caused by mutation in the WWOX gene (605131); DEE29 (616339), caused by mutation in the AARS gene (601065); DEE30 (616341), caused by mutation in the SIK1 gene (605705); DEE31 (616346), caused by mutation in the DNM1 gene (602377); DEE32 (616366), caused by mutation in the KCNA2 gene (176262); DEE33 (616409), caused by mutation in the EEF1A2 gene (602959); DEE34 (616645), caused by mutation in the SLC12A5 gene (606726); DEE35 (616647), caused by mutation in the ITPA gene (147520); DEE36 (300884), caused by mutation in the ALG13 gene (300776); DEE37 (616981), caused by mutation in the FRRS1L gene (604574); DEE38 (617020), caused by mutation in the ARV1 gene (611647); DEE39 (612949), caused by mutation in the SLC25A12 gene (603667); DEE40 (617065), caused by mutation in the GUF1 gene (617064); DEE41 (617105), caused by mutation in the SLC1A2 gene (600300); DEE42 (617106), caused by mutation in the CACNA1A gene (601011); DEE43 (617113), caused by mutation in the GABRB3 gene (137192); DEE44 (617132), caused by mutation in the UBA5 gene (610552); DEE45 (617153), caused by mutation in the GABRB1 gene (137190); DEE46 (617162), caused by mutation in the GRIN2D gene (602717); DEE47 (617166), caused by mutation in the FGF12 gene (601513); DEE48 (617276), caused by mutation in the AP3B2 gene (602166); DEE49 (617281), caused by mutation in the DENND5A gene (617278); DEE50 (616457) caused by mutation in the CAD gene (114010); DEE51 (617339), caused by mutation in the MDH2 gene (154100); DEE52 (617350), caused by mutation in the SCN1B gene (600235); DEE53 (617389), caused by mutation in the SYNJ1 gene (604297); DEE54 (617391), caused by mutation in the HNRNPU gene (602869); DEE55 (617599), caused by mutation in the PIGP gene (605938); DEE56 (617665), caused by mutation in the YWHAG gene (605356); DEE57 (617771), caused by mutation in the KCNT2 gene (610044); DEE58 (617830), caused by mutation in the NTRK2 gene (600456); DEE59 (617904), caused by mutation in the GABBR2 gene (607340); DEE60 (617929), caused by mutation in the CNPY3 gene (610774); DEE61 (617933), caused by mutation in the ADAM22 gene (603709); DEE62 (617938), caused by mutation in the SCN3A gene (182391); DEE63 (617976), caused by mutation in the CPLX1 gene (605032); DEE64 (618004), caused by mutation in the RHOBTB2 gene (607352); DEE65 (618008), caused by mutation in the CYFIP2 gene (606323); DEE66 (618067), caused by mutation in the PACS2 gene (610423); DEE67 (618141), caused by mutation in the CUX2 gene (610648); DEE68 (618201), caused by mutation in the TRAK1 gene (608112); DEE69 (618285), caused by mutation in the CACNA1E gene (601013); DEE70 (618298) caused by mutation in the PHACTR1 gene (608723); DEE71 (618328), caused by mutation in the GLS gene (138280); DEE72 (618374), caused by mutation in the NEUROD2 gene (601725); DEE73 (618379), caused by mutation in the RNF13 gene (609247); DEE74 (618396), caused by mutation in the GABRG2 gene (137164); DEE75 (618437), caused by mutation in the PARS2 gene (612036); DEE76 (618468), caused by mutation in the ACTL6B gene (612458); DEE77 (618548), caused by mutation in the PIGQ gene (605754); DEE78 (618557), caused by mutation in the GABRA2 gene (137140); DEE79 (618559), caused by mutation in the GABRA5 gene (137142); DEE80 (618580), caused by mutation in the PIGB gene (604122); DEE81 (618663), caused by mutation in the DMXL2 gene (612186); DEE82 (618721), caused by mutation in the GOT2 gene (138150); DEE83 (618744), caused by mutation in the UGP2 gene (191760); DEE84 (618792), caused by mutation in the UGDH gene (603370); DEE85 (301044), caused by mutation in the SMC1A gene (300040); DEE86 (618910), caused by mutation in the DALRD3 gene (618904); DEE87 (618916), caused by mutation in the CDK19 gene (614720); DEE88 (618959), caused by mutation in the MDH1 gene (152400); DEE89 (619124), caused by mutation in the GAD1 gene (605363); DEE90 (301058), caused by mutation in the FGF13 gene (300070); DEE91 (617711), caused by mutation in the PPP3CA gene (114105); DEE92 (617829), caused by mutation in the GABRB2 gene (600232); DEE93 (618012), caused by mutation in the ATP6V1A gene (607027); DEE94 (615369), caused by mutation in the CHD2 gene (602119); DEE95 (618143), caused by mutation in the PIGS gene (610271); DEE96 (619340), caused by mutation in the NSF gene (601633); DEE97 (619561), caused by mutation in the iCELF2 gene (602538); DEE98 (619605), caused by mutation in the ATP1A2 gene (182340); DEE99 (619606), caused by mutation in the ATP1A3 gene (182350); DEE100 (619777), caused by mutation in the FBXO28 gene (609100); DEE101 (619814), caused by mutation in the GRIN1 gene (138249); DEE102 (619881), caused by mutation in the SLC38A3 gene (604437); DEE103 (619913), caused by mutation in the KCNC2 gene (176256); DEE104 (619970), caused by mutation in the ATP6V0A1 gene (192130); DEE105 (619983), caused by mutation in the HID1 gene (605752); DEE106 (620028), caused by mutation in the UFSP2 gene (611482); and DEE107 (620033), caused by mutation in the NAPB gene (611270). The phe
Combined oxidative phosphorylation defect type 13
MedGen UID:
767043
Concept ID:
C3554129
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-13 (COXPD13) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction. Affected individuals develop severe neurologic impairment in the first months of life, including hypotonia, abnormal dystonic movements, hearing loss, poor feeding, global developmental delay, and abnormal eye movements. Brain imaging shows signal abnormalities in putamen, basal ganglia, caudate nuclei, or corpus callosum, as well as delayed myelination. Analysis of patient tissues shows multiple defects in enzymatic activities of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, although some tissues may show normal values since tissue expression of the mitochondrial defect and metabolic needs of specific tissues are variable (summary by Vedrenne et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Basal ganglia calcification, idiopathic, 5
MedGen UID:
815975
Concept ID:
C3809645
Disease or Syndrome
Primary familial brain calcification (PFBC) is a neurodegenerative disorder with characteristic calcium deposits in the basal ganglia and other brain areas visualized on neuroimaging. Most affected individuals are in good health during childhood and young adulthood and typically present in the fourth to fifth decade with a gradually progressive movement disorder and neuropsychiatric symptoms. The movement disorder first manifests as clumsiness, fatigability, unsteady gait, slow or slurred speech, dysphagia, involuntary movements, or muscle cramping. Neuropsychiatric symptoms, often the first or most prominent manifestations, range from mild difficulty with concentration and memory to changes in personality and/or behavior, to psychosis and dementia. Seizures of various types occur frequently, some individuals experience chronic headache and vertigo; urinary urgency or incontinence may be present.
Intellectual disability, autosomal recessive 42
MedGen UID:
862780
Concept ID:
C4014343
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with dysmorphic features, spasticity, and brain abnormalities (NEDDSBA) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severely delayed global development, with hypotonia, impaired intellectual development, and poor or absent speech. Most patients have spasticity with limb hypertonia and brisk tendon reflexes. Additional features include nonspecific dysmorphic facial features, structural brain abnormalities, and cortical visual impairment (summary by Bosch et al., 2015). Novarino et al. (2014) labeled the disorder 'spastic paraplegia-67' (SPG67). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 27
MedGen UID:
863753
Concept ID:
C4015316
Disease or Syndrome
GRIN2B-related neurodevelopmental disorder is characterized by mild to profound developmental delay / intellectual disability (DD/ID) in all affected individuals. Muscle tone abnormalities (spasticity and/or hypotonia, occasionally associated with feeding difficulties), as well as epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) / behavioral issues, are common. Other infantile- or childhood-onset findings include microcephaly; dystonic, dyskinetic, or choreiform movement disorder; and/or cortical visual impairment. Brain MRI reveals a malformation of cortical development in a minority of affected individuals. To date, fewer than 100 individuals with GRIN2B-related neurodevelopmental disorder have been reported.
Hypotonia, infantile, with psychomotor retardation and characteristic facies 2
MedGen UID:
907651
Concept ID:
C4225203
Disease or Syndrome
UNC80 deficiency is characterized by hypotonia, strabismus, oral motor dysfunction, postnatal growth deficiency, and developmental delay. The majority of individuals do not learn to walk. All individuals lack expressive language; however, many have expressive body language, and a few have used signs to communicate. Seizures may develop during infancy or childhood. Additional features can include nystagmus, extremity hypertonia, a high-pitched cry, repetitive and self-stimulatory behaviors, constipation, clubfeet, joint contractures, and scoliosis. For most individuals the UNC80 deficiency syndrome is not progressive. Individuals have slow acquisition of skills and do not have a loss of skills suggestive of neurodegeneration.
Dystonia, childhood-onset, with optic atrophy and basal ganglia abnormalities
MedGen UID:
934601
Concept ID:
C4310634
Disease or Syndrome
MECR-related neurologic disorder is characterized by a progressive childhood-onset movement disorder and optic atrophy; intellect is often – but not always – preserved. The movement disorder typically presents between ages one and 6.5 years and is mainly dystonia that can be accompanied by chorea and/or ataxia. Over time some affected individuals require assistive devices for mobility. Speech fluency and intelligibility are progressively impaired due to dysarthria. Optic atrophy typically develops between ages four and 12 years and manifests as reduced visual acuity, which can include functional blindness (also known as legal blindness) in adulthood. Because only 13 affected individuals are known to the authors, and because nearly half of them were diagnosed retrospectively as adults, the natural history of disease progression and other aspects of the phenotype have not yet been completely defined.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 48
MedGen UID:
934604
Concept ID:
C4310637
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-48 (DEE48) is a severe autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by global developmental delay with intellectual disability and absent speech; poor, if any, motor development; and onset of seizures usually in the first year of life, although later onset has been reported. Affected individuals have poor eye contact and may develop microcephaly and abnormal movements (summary by Assoum et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Intellectual disability-epilepsy-extrapyramidal syndrome
MedGen UID:
934650
Concept ID:
C4310683
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and impaired expressive language and with or without seizures (NEDHELS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypotonia, poor feeding, and global developmental delay apparent from infancy. Most patients have poor overall growth, poor eye contact, sleep disturbances, and severely impaired expressive language. Affected individuals also tend to have behavioral problems, microcephaly, and variable dysmorphic features; many develop seizures. Brain imaging may show enlarged ventricles, thin corpus callosum and brainstem, and white matter abnormalities. The phenotype is variable (summary by Nabais Sa et al., 2019).
Neurodegeneration with ataxia, dystonia, and gaze palsy, childhood-onset
MedGen UID:
934660
Concept ID:
C4310693
Disease or Syndrome
Childhood-onset neurodegeneration with ataxia, dystonia, and gaze palsy (NADGP) is an autosomal recessive progressive disorder characterized by onset of gait ataxia, cognitive decline, and gaze palsy in the first or second decades. Additional features include dysarthria, dystonia, and athetoid movements. Some patients may become wheelchair-bound as young adults (summary by Haack et al., 2016).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 43
MedGen UID:
934679
Concept ID:
C4310712
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-43 (DEE43) is a neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of various types of seizures usually in the first year of life. The age at onset is highly variable, ranging from the neonatal period to about 12 months of age. Later onset may rarely occur. Seizure types include febrile, infantile spasms, focal, tonic-clonic, and myoclonic; they tend to be refractory to treatment. Affected individuals show global developmental delay with mild to moderate intellectual disability, although some may have normal early development before the onset of seizures. EEG shows focal, multifocal, or generalized sharp waves associated with seizures, sometimes with hypsarrhythmia. Additional more variable features include tube feeding, hypotonia, peripheral hypertonia, ataxia, dyskinesia, and behavioral difficulties, including aggression, ADHD, stereotypic, and impulsive behavior (summary by the Epi4K Consortium, 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Dyskinesia, limb and orofacial, infantile-onset
MedGen UID:
934759
Concept ID:
C4310792
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile-onset limb and orofacial dyskinesia is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by delayed motor development and onset of a hyperkinetic movement disorder in the first year of life. The disorder results in impaired walking and orofacial dyskinesia with difficulty talking; the severity is variable (summary by Diggle et al., 2016).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with involuntary movements
MedGen UID:
1374697
Concept ID:
C4479569
Disease or Syndrome
NEDIM is a neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development and infantile or childhood onset of hyperkinetic involuntary movements, including chorea and athetosis. The abnormal movements can be severe, sometimes resulting in inability to sit, walk, speak, or eat. Hyperkinetic movements can be exacerbated by specific triggers, such as stress, illness, or high temperature. Some patients have brain abnormalities, such as cerebral atrophy or thin corpus callosum, and some patients may develop seizures (summary by Ananth et al., 2016 and Danti et al., 2017).
Psychomotor regression-oculomotor apraxia-movement disorder-nephropathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
1621949
Concept ID:
C4539828
Disease or Syndrome
Birk-Landau-Perez syndrome (BILAPES) is an autosomal recessive syndromic developmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy or early childhood. Some patients have developmental regression with loss of speech and motor skills, whereas other patients never achieve these milestones. More variable features may include hypotonia, poor overall growth, ataxia, dystonia, abnormal eye movements, and renal insufficiency (Perez et al., 2017; Kleyner et al., 2022).
Epileptic encephalopathy, infantile or early childhood, 2
MedGen UID:
1638319
Concept ID:
C4693362
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-92 (DEE92) is characterized in most patients by onset of seizures in infancy or childhood and associated with global developmental delay and variable impairment of intellectual development. The seizure type and severity varies, and seizures may be intractable in some patients. Some patients are severely affected, unable to walk or speak, whereas others show some development. Additional neurologic features, including cortical blindness, dystonia, and spasticity, may occur. Mutations occur de novo (summary by Hamdan et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Parkinsonism-dystonia, infantile, 1
MedGen UID:
1648442
Concept ID:
C4747621
Disease or Syndrome
SLC6A3-related dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome (DTDS) is a complex movement disorder with a continuum that ranges from classic early-onset DTDS (in the first 6 months) to atypical later-onset DTDS (in childhood, adolescence, or adulthood). Classic DTDS. Infants typically manifest nonspecific findings (irritability, feeding difficulties, axial hypotonia, and/or delayed motor development) followed by a hyperkinetic movement disorder (with features of chorea, dystonia, ballismus, orolingual dyskinesia). Over time, affected individuals develop parkinsonism-dystonia characterized by bradykinesia (progressing to akinesia), dystonic posturing, distal tremor, rigidity, and reduced facial expression. Limitation of voluntary movements leads to severe motor delay. Episodic status dystonicus, exacerbations of dystonia, and secondary orthopedic, gastrointestinal, and respiratory complications are common. Many affected individuals appear to show relative preservation of intellect with good cognitive development. Atypical DTDS. Normal psychomotor development in infancy and early childhood is followed by later-onset manifestations of parkinsonism-dystonia with tremor, progressive bradykinesia, variable tone, and dystonic posturing. The long-term outcome of this form is currently unknown.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 67
MedGen UID:
1648285
Concept ID:
C4748341
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-67 (DEE67) is characterized by the onset of various types of seizures in the first months of life, although later onset may occur in milder cases. The seizures tend to be resistant to treatment. Affected individuals have global developmental delay with impaired motor and intellectual development, poor or absent speech, movement disorders, and stereotypic or autistic behavior (summary by Chatron et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Infantile hypotonia-oculomotor anomalies-hyperkinetic movements-developmental delay syndrome
MedGen UID:
1648431
Concept ID:
C4748715
Disease or Syndrome
Baker-Gordon syndrome (BAGOS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by infantile hypotonia, ophthalmic abnormalities, moderate to profound global developmental delay, poor or absent speech, behavioral abnormalities, hyperkinetic movements, and EEG abnormalities in the absence of overt seizures (summary by Baker et al., 2018).
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 2
MedGen UID:
1648466
Concept ID:
C4748737
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 28
MedGen UID:
1648493
Concept ID:
C4748827
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder with short stature and variable skeletal anomalies
MedGen UID:
1680968
Concept ID:
C5193105
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 17
MedGen UID:
1684823
Concept ID:
C5231412
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual disability, X-linked 102
MedGen UID:
1715418
Concept ID:
C5393299
Disease or Syndrome
DDX3X-related neurodevelopmental disorder (DDX3X-NDD) typically occurs in females and very rarely in males. All affected individuals reported to date have developmental delay / intellectual disability (ID) ranging from mild to severe; about 50% of affected girls remain nonverbal after age five years. Hypotonia, a common finding, can be associated with feeding difficulty in infancy. Behavioral issues can include autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and hyperactivity, self-injurious behavior, poor impulse control, and aggression. Other findings can include seizures, movement disorders (dyskinesia, spasticity, abnormal gait), vision and hearing impairment, congenital heart defects, respiratory difficulties, joint laxity, and scoliosis. Neuroblastoma has been observed in three individuals.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 44
MedGen UID:
1718899
Concept ID:
C5394293
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-44 (COXPD44) is an autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder with multisystemic manifestations. Most affected individuals present in infancy or early childhood with global developmental delay, hypotonia, and abnormal movements. Most patients develop seizures, often associated with status epilepticus, and some patients may have optic atrophy. One patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been reported. Serum lactate may be increased, although that finding is inconsistent. Detailed biochemical analysis shows variable combined deficiencies of mitochondrial oxidative complexes that appear to be tissue-specific (summary by Wei et al., 2020). For discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 19
MedGen UID:
1770258
Concept ID:
C5436514
Disease or Syndrome
Kaya-Barakat-Masson syndrome
MedGen UID:
1725501
Concept ID:
C5436856
Disease or Syndrome
Kaya-Barakat-Masson syndrome (KABAMAS) is a severe autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by profoundly impaired global development with variable motor abnormalities, such as axial hypotonia, peripheral spasticity, dystonia, and poor coordination, resulting in the inability to sit or walk. Affected individuals have impaired intellectual development with absent speech, poor eye contact, and feeding difficulties, resulting in poor overall growth, sometimes with microcephaly. Dysmorphic features are generally not present. Additional more variable features include early-onset seizures, ocular anomalies, foot deformities, and nonspecific brain imaging findings, such as thin corpus callosum and cerebral, cerebellar, or pontine atrophy. Some patients may die in infancy or early childhood (summary by AlMuhaizea et al., 2020 and Diaz et al., 2020).
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, sensorineural hearing loss, impaired intellectual development, and leber congenital amaurosis
MedGen UID:
1780157
Concept ID:
C5543257
Disease or Syndrome
SHILCA is characterized by early-onset retinal degeneration in association with sensorineural hearing loss, short stature, vertebral anomalies, and epiphyseal dysplasia, as well as motor and intellectual delay. Delayed myelination, leukoencephalopathy, and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and cerebellum have been observed on brain MRI (Bedoni et al., 2020).
Leukodystrophy, hypomyelinating, 21
MedGen UID:
1778269
Concept ID:
C5543334
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-21 (HLD21) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy with loss of motor, speech, and cognitive milestones in the first decades of life. Affected individuals show cerebellar and pyramidal signs, including nystagmus, ataxia, dystonia, and spasticity, resulting in the loss of ambulation. Other more variable features include feeding difficulties, poor overall growth with microcephaly, optic atrophy, and seizures. Brain imaging shows diffuse hypomyelination of the white matter and atrophy of the cerebellum and corpus callosum. The disorder is progressive and may lead to premature death (summary by Dorboz et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080.
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 31
MedGen UID:
1786855
Concept ID:
C5543627
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-31 (SCAR31) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with hypotonia and variably impaired intellectual and language development. Affected individuals have an ataxic gait, tremor, and dysarthria; more severely affected patients also have spasticity with inability to walk. Most have optic atrophy. Brain imaging shows cerebellar hypoplasia, enlarged ventricles, and atrophy of the posterior corpus callosum. Additional features may include retinitis pigmentosa, sensorineural deafness, dysmorphic facial features, and possibly endocrine dysfunction (summary by Collier et al., 2021).
Dyskinesia with orofacial involvement, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1790407
Concept ID:
C5551343
Disease or Syndrome
ADCY5 dyskinesia is a hyperkinetic movement disorder (more prominent in the face and arms than the legs) characterized by infantile to late-adolescent onset of chorea, athetosis, dystonia, myoclonus, or a combination of these. To date, affected individuals have had overlapping (but not identical) manifestations with wide-ranging severity. The facial movements are typically periorbital and perioral. The dyskinesia is prone to episodic or paroxysmal exacerbation lasting minutes to hours, and may occur during sleep. Precipitating factors in some persons have included emotional stress, intercurrent illness, sneezing, or caffeine; in others, no precipitating factors have been identified. In some children, severe infantile axial hypotonia results in gross motor delays accompanied by chorea, sometimes with language delays. The overall tendency is for the abnormal movements to stabilize in early middle age, at which point they may improve in some individuals; less commonly, the abnormal movements are slowly progressive, increasing in severity and frequency.
HENGEL-MAROOFIAN-SCHOLS SYNDROME
MedGen UID:
1794242
Concept ID:
C5562032
Disease or Syndrome
Hengel-Maroofian-Schols syndrome (HEMARS) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe global developmental delay apparent from infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals have delayed walking or inability to walk, impaired intellectual development with poor or absent speech, pyramidal signs manifest as lower limb spasticity, poor overall growth often with short stature and microcephaly, and dysmorphic facial features. Some patients develop seizures. Brain imaging shows thinning of the posterior part of the corpus callosum, delayed myelination, and cerebral and cerebellar atrophy (Hengel et al., 2021).

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Hattori N, Kamei T, Ishida T, Suzuki I, Nomoto M, Tsuboi Y
J Neural Transm (Vienna) 2022 Oct;129(10):1277-1287. Epub 2022 Aug 24 doi: 10.1007/s00702-022-02532-2. PMID: 36001147Free PMC Article
Rascol O, Tönges L, deVries T, Jaros M, Quartel A, Jacobs D; ALLAY-LID I and ALLAY-LID II study groups.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2022 Mar;96:65-73. Epub 2022 Feb 8 doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2022.01.022. PMID: 35227940
Jung JH, Kim YJ, Chung SJ, Yoo HS, Lee YH, Baik K, Jeong SH, Lee YG, Lee HS, Ye BS, Sohn YH, Jeong Y, Lee PH
J Neurol 2022 Jun;269(6):2948-2960. Epub 2021 Nov 11 doi: 10.1007/s00415-021-10883-1. PMID: 34762146
Ogawa T, Hatano T, Kamagata K, Andica C, Takeshige-Amano H, Uchida W, Saito Y, Shimo Y, Oyama G, Umemura A, Iwamuro H, Ito M, Hori M, Aoki S, Hattori N
Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2021 Sep;90:8-14. Epub 2021 Jul 24 doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2021.07.021. PMID: 34325387
Freire-Alvarez E, Kurča E, Lopez Manzanares L, Pekkonen E, Spanaki C, Vanni P, Liu Y, Sánchez-Soliño O, Barbato LM
Mov Disord 2021 Nov;36(11):2615-2623. Epub 2021 Jul 8 doi: 10.1002/mds.28703. PMID: 34236101Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Barer Y, Ribalov R, Yaari A, Maor R, Arow Q, Logan J, Chodick G, Arkadir D, Eitan R
J Clin Psychopharmacol 2022 Sep-Oct 01;42(5):454-460. Epub 2022 Aug 20 doi: 10.1097/JCP.0000000000001597. PMID: 36018237Free PMC Article
Sağlam G, Telli H
Agri 2022 Apr;34(2):100-108. doi: 10.14744/agri.2022.87059. PMID: 35848815
Wu Q, Yuan F, Zhang S, Liu W, Miao Q, Zheng X, Lu S, Hou K
Dis Markers 2022;2022:1767989. Epub 2022 Mar 8 doi: 10.1155/2022/1767989. PMID: 35299866Free PMC Article
Zhang Z, Liu G, Wang D, Chen H, Su D, Kou W, Zhao J, Wang X, Wang Z, Ma H, Feng T
Neurol Sci 2022 May;43(5):3165-3174. Epub 2021 Dec 1 doi: 10.1007/s10072-021-05694-1. PMID: 34853899
Huang XJ, Wang SG, Guo XN, Tian WT, Zhan FX, Zhu ZY, Yin XM, Liu Q, Yin KL, Liu XR, Zhang Y, Liu ZG, Liu XL, Zheng L, Wang T, Wu L, Rong TY, Wang Y, Zhang M, Bi GH, Tang WG, Zhang C, Zhong P, Wang CY, Tang JG, Lu W, Zhang RX, Zhao GH, Li XH, Li H, Chen T, Li HY, Luo XG, Song YY, Tang HD, Luan XH, Zhou HY, Tang BS, Chen SD, Cao L
Mov Disord 2020 Aug;35(8):1428-1437. Epub 2020 May 11 doi: 10.1002/mds.28061. PMID: 32392383

Therapy

Hattori N, Kamei T, Ishida T, Suzuki I, Nomoto M, Tsuboi Y
J Neural Transm (Vienna) 2022 Oct;129(10):1277-1287. Epub 2022 Aug 24 doi: 10.1007/s00702-022-02532-2. PMID: 36001147Free PMC Article
Rascol O, Tönges L, deVries T, Jaros M, Quartel A, Jacobs D; ALLAY-LID I and ALLAY-LID II study groups.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2022 Mar;96:65-73. Epub 2022 Feb 8 doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2022.01.022. PMID: 35227940
Oh T, Daadi ES, Kim J, Daadi EW, Chen PJ, Roy-Choudhury G, Bohmann J, Blass BE, Daadi MM
Exp Neurol 2022 Jan;347:113920. Epub 2021 Nov 8 doi: 10.1016/j.expneurol.2021.113920. PMID: 34762921
Jung JH, Kim YJ, Chung SJ, Yoo HS, Lee YH, Baik K, Jeong SH, Lee YG, Lee HS, Ye BS, Sohn YH, Jeong Y, Lee PH
J Neurol 2022 Jun;269(6):2948-2960. Epub 2021 Nov 11 doi: 10.1007/s00415-021-10883-1. PMID: 34762146
Tsuboi Y, Nakamura M, Maruyama H, Matsumoto Y
J Neurol Sci 2021 Nov 15;430:120026. Epub 2021 Oct 7 doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2021.120026. PMID: 34715471

Prognosis

Hattori N, Kamei T, Ishida T, Suzuki I, Nomoto M, Tsuboi Y
J Neural Transm (Vienna) 2022 Oct;129(10):1277-1287. Epub 2022 Aug 24 doi: 10.1007/s00702-022-02532-2. PMID: 36001147Free PMC Article
Jung JH, Kim YJ, Chung SJ, Yoo HS, Lee YH, Baik K, Jeong SH, Lee YG, Lee HS, Ye BS, Sohn YH, Jeong Y, Lee PH
J Neurol 2022 Jun;269(6):2948-2960. Epub 2021 Nov 11 doi: 10.1007/s00415-021-10883-1. PMID: 34762146
Arat-Çelik HE, Kök-Kendirlioğlu B, Çetin B, Küçükgöncü S
Turk Psikiyatri Derg 2021;32(4):283-285. doi: 10.5080/u25613. PMID: 34964103
Dong X, Zheng D, Nao J
Neurosci Lett 2019 Jul 13;705:172-176. Epub 2019 May 2 doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2019.05.002. PMID: 31054924
Kent JS, Caligiuri MP, Skorheim MK, Lano TJ, Mittal VA, Sponheim SR
Psychiatry Res 2019 Feb;272:135-140. Epub 2018 Dec 6 doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2018.12.007. PMID: 30580137Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Hattori N, Kamei T, Ishida T, Suzuki I, Nomoto M, Tsuboi Y
J Neural Transm (Vienna) 2022 Oct;129(10):1277-1287. Epub 2022 Aug 24 doi: 10.1007/s00702-022-02532-2. PMID: 36001147Free PMC Article
Rascol O, Tönges L, deVries T, Jaros M, Quartel A, Jacobs D; ALLAY-LID I and ALLAY-LID II study groups.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2022 Mar;96:65-73. Epub 2022 Feb 8 doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2022.01.022. PMID: 35227940
Zhang Z, Liu G, Wang D, Chen H, Su D, Kou W, Zhao J, Wang X, Wang Z, Ma H, Feng T
Neurol Sci 2022 May;43(5):3165-3174. Epub 2021 Dec 1 doi: 10.1007/s10072-021-05694-1. PMID: 34853899
Jung JH, Kim YJ, Chung SJ, Yoo HS, Lee YH, Baik K, Jeong SH, Lee YG, Lee HS, Ye BS, Sohn YH, Jeong Y, Lee PH
J Neurol 2022 Jun;269(6):2948-2960. Epub 2021 Nov 11 doi: 10.1007/s00415-021-10883-1. PMID: 34762146
Tsuboi Y, Nakamura M, Maruyama H, Matsumoto Y
J Neurol Sci 2021 Nov 15;430:120026. Epub 2021 Oct 7 doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2021.120026. PMID: 34715471

Recent systematic reviews

Hasanain AA, Soliman MAR, Elwy R, Ezzat AAM, Abdel-Bari SH, Marx S, Jenkins A, El Refaee E, Zohdi A
Br J Neurosurg 2022 Jun;36(3):329-339. Epub 2022 May 17 doi: 10.1080/02688697.2022.2074373. PMID: 35579079
Falla M, Di Fonzo A, Hicks AA, Pramstaller PP, Fabbrini G
Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2021 Mar;84:52-60. Epub 2021 Jan 31 doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2021.01.020. PMID: 33561612
Pardis P, Remington G, Panda R, Lemez M, Agid O
J Psychopharmacol 2019 Oct;33(10):1187-1198. Epub 2019 Jul 26 doi: 10.1177/0269881119862535. PMID: 31347436
Ricciardi L, Pringsheim T, Barnes TRE, Martino D, Gardner D, Remington G, Addington D, Morgante F, Poole N, Carson A, Edwards M
Can J Psychiatry 2019 Jun;64(6):388-399. Epub 2019 Feb 21 doi: 10.1177/0706743719828968. PMID: 30791698Free PMC Article
Essali A, Soares-Weiser K, Bergman H, Adams CE
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2018 Mar 26;3:CD000206. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD000206.pub4. PMID: 29578611Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Table of contents

    Clinical resources

    Consumer resources

    Recent activity

    Your browsing activity is empty.

    Activity recording is turned off.

    Turn recording back on

    See more...
    Support Center