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Depressivity

MedGen UID:
4229
Concept ID:
C0011581
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Synonym: Depression
SNOMED CT: Depressive neurosis (78667006); Mood disorder of depressed type (35489007); Depression (35489007); Depressive illness (35489007); Depressive disorder (35489007)
 
HPO: HP:0000716

Definition

Frequent feelings of being down, miserable, and/or hopeless; difficulty recovering from such moods; pessimism about the future; pervasive shame; feeling of inferior self-worth; thoughts of suicide and suicidal behavior. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Lipomatosis dolorosa
MedGen UID:
1757
Concept ID:
C0001529
Disease or Syndrome
Adiposis dolorosa, also known as Dercum disease, is characterized by generalized obesity and pronounced, disabling, and chronic pain in the adipose tissue of the proximal extremities, trunk, pelvic area, and buttocks; the face and hands are usually spared. There are a number of associated symptoms, including multiple lipomas, generalized weakness, fatigue, sleep disturbances, constipation, and psychiatric abnormalities. It is 5 to 30 times more common in women than men, and usually presents between 35 and 50 years of age (summary by Campen et al., 2001; review by Hansson et al., 2012). Based on a review of the literature and studies of 111 patients, Hansson et al. (2012) proposed a classification of Dercum disease into 4 types: (I) generalized diffuse form without clear lipomas, (II) generalized nodular form with multiple lipomas, (III) localized nodular form, and (IV) juxtaarticular form with solitary fatty deposits near joints.
Celiac disease
MedGen UID:
3291
Concept ID:
C0007570
Disease or Syndrome
Celiac disease is a systemic autoimmune disease that can be associated with gastrointestinal findings (diarrhea, malabsorption, abdominal pain and distension, bloating, vomiting, and weight loss) and/or highly variable non-gastrointestinal findings (dermatitis herpetiformis, chronic fatigue, joint pain/inflammation, iron deficiency anemia, migraines, depression, attention-deficit disorder, epilepsy, osteoporosis/osteopenia, infertility and/or recurrent fetal loss, vitamin deficiencies, short stature, failure to thrive, delayed puberty, dental enamel defects, and autoimmune disorders). Classic celiac disease, characterized by mild to severe gastrointestinal symptoms, is less common than non-classic celiac disease, characterized by absence of gastrointestinal symptoms.
Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome
MedGen UID:
4886
Concept ID:
C0017495
Disease or Syndrome
Genetic prion disease generally manifests with cognitive difficulties, ataxia, and myoclonus (abrupt jerking movements of muscle groups and/or entire limbs). The order of appearance and/or predominance of these features and other associated neurologic and psychiatric findings vary. The three major phenotypes of genetic prion disease are genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (gCJD), fatal familial insomnia (FFI), and Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome. Although these phenotypes display overlapping clinical and pathologic features, recognition of these phenotypes can be useful when providing affected individuals and their families with information about the expected clinical course. The age at onset typically ranges from 50 to 60 years. The disease course ranges from a few months in gCJD and FFI to a few (up to 4, and in rare cases up to 10) years in GSS syndrome.
Pigmentary pallidal degeneration
MedGen UID:
6708
Concept ID:
C0018523
Disease or Syndrome
Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a type of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). The phenotypic spectrum of PKAN includes classic PKAN and atypical PKAN. Classic PKAN is characterized by early childhood onset of progressive dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity, and choreoathetosis. Pigmentary retinal degeneration is common. Atypical PKAN is characterized by later onset (age >10 years), prominent speech defects, psychiatric disturbances, and more gradual progression of disease.
Huntington disease
MedGen UID:
5654
Concept ID:
C0020179
Disease or Syndrome
Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive disorder of motor, cognitive, and psychiatric disturbances. The mean age of onset is 35 to 44 years, and the median survival time is 15 to 18 years after onset.
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
MedGen UID:
7179
Concept ID:
C0022336
Disease or Syndrome
Prion disease represents a group of conditions that affect the nervous system in humans and animals. In people, these conditions impair brain function, causing changes in memory, personality, and behavior; a decline in intellectual function (dementia); and abnormal movements, particularly difficulty with coordinating movements (ataxia). The signs and symptoms of prion disease typically begin in adulthood and worsen with time, leading to death within a few months to several years.
Adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis
MedGen UID:
7230
Concept ID:
C0022797
Disease or Syndrome
Adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, also known as Kufs disease, is a neurodegenerative disorder without retinal involvement. There are 2 overlapping phenotypes: type A, characterized by progressive myoclonic epilepsy, and type B, characterized by dementia and a variety of motor-system signs (summary by Arsov et al., 2011). In general, the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL; CLN) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the intracellular accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment storage material in different patterns ultrastructurally. The clinical course includes progressive dementia, seizures, and progressive visual failure. The ultrastructural pattern of lipopigment in CLN4 comprises a mixed pattern of 'granular,' 'curvilinear,' and 'fingerprint' profiles (Mole et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CLN, see CLN1 (256730).
Obsessive-compulsive disorder
MedGen UID:
14445
Concept ID:
C0028768
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by recurring obsessions and/or compulsions and has been estimated to affect nearly 5 million people in the United States (Karno et al., 1988). Evidence for a strong genetic component in OCD comes from twin studies, family genetics studies, and segregation analyses, as reviewed by Alsobrook et al. (2002). Zhang et al. (2002) suggested that hoarding is likely to be an evolutionarily conserved trait that, in times of adversity, was associated with increased survival and reproductive fitness. However, extreme forms of this trait are associated with marked disability and poor response to treatment (Black et al., 1998; Mataix-Cols et al., 1999).
Stiff-man syndrome
MedGen UID:
39017
Concept ID:
C0085292
Disease or Syndrome
The stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is most often an adult-onset sporadic acquired disorder characterized by progressive muscle stiffness with superimposed painful muscle spasms accompanied by electromyographic evidence of continuous motor activity at rest. SPS has been associated with autoimmune disorders, diabetes mellitus, thyrotoxicosis, and hypopituitarism with adrenal insufficiency (George et al., 1984). Approximately 60% of patients with SPS have antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD2, or GAD65; 138275), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting an immune-mediated pathogenesis (Folli et al., 1993). Approximately 10% of patients develop SPS as a paraneoplastic neurologic disorder associated with antibodies to amphiphysin (AMPH; 600418), an intracellular protein associated with neuronal synaptic vesicle endocytosis (Burns, 2005). See also congenital stiff-man syndrome, or hereditary hyperexplexia (149400), which is caused by mutations in subunits of the glycine receptor gene (GLRA1, 138491; GLRB, 138492). Meinck and Thompson (2002) provided a detailed review of stiff-person syndrome. They also discussed 2 possibly related conditions, progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity (PERM), a more severe disorder with other neurologic features, and stiff-limb or stiff-leg syndrome, a focal disorder.
Hereditary coproporphyria
MedGen UID:
57931
Concept ID:
C0162531
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) is an acute (hepatic) porphyria in which the acute symptoms are neurovisceral and occur in discrete episodes. Attacks typically start in the abdomen with low-grade pain that slowly increases over a period of days (not hours) with nausea progressing to vomiting. In some individuals, the pain is predominantly in the back or extremities. When an acute attack is untreated, a motor neuropathy may develop over a period of days or a few weeks. The neuropathy first appears as weakness proximally in the arms and legs, then progresses distally to involve the hands and feet. Some individuals experience respiratory insufficiency due to loss of innervation of the diaphragm and muscles of respiration. Acute attacks are associated commonly with use of certain medications, caloric deprivation, and changes in female reproductive hormones. About 20% of those with an acute attack also experience photosensitivity associated with bullae and skin fragility.
Acute intermittent porphyria
MedGen UID:
56452
Concept ID:
C0162565
Disease or Syndrome
Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an autosomal dominant disorder, occurs in heterozygotes for an HMBS pathogenic variant that causes reduced activity of the enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase. AIP is considered "overt" in a heterozygote who was previously or is currently symptomatic; AIP is considered "latent" in a heterozygote who has never had symptoms, and typically has been identified during molecular genetic testing of at-risk family members. Note that GeneReviews does not use the term "carrier" for an individual who is heterozygous for an autosomal dominant pathogenic variant; GeneReviews reserves the term "carrier" for an individual who is heterozygous for an autosomal recessive disorder and thus is not expected to ever develop manifestations of the disorder. Overt AIP is characterized clinically by life-threatening acute neurovisceral attacks of severe abdominal pain without peritoneal signs, often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, tachycardia, and hypertension. Attacks may be complicated by neurologic findings (mental changes, convulsions, and peripheral neuropathy that may progress to respiratory paralysis), and hyponatremia. Acute attacks, which may be provoked by certain drugs, alcoholic beverages, endocrine factors, calorie restriction, stress, and infections, usually resolve within two weeks. Most individuals with AIP have one or a few attacks; about 3%-8% (mainly women) have recurrent attacks (defined as >3 attacks/year) that may persist for years. Other long-term complications are chronic renal failure, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and hypertension. Attacks, which are very rare before puberty, are more common in women than men. Latent AIP. While all individuals heterozygous for an HMBS pathogenic variant that predisposes to AIP are at risk of developing overt AIP, most have latent AIP and never have symptoms.
Gaucher disease type III
MedGen UID:
78653
Concept ID:
C0268251
Disease or Syndrome
Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity.
Trimethylaminuria
MedGen UID:
83350
Concept ID:
C0342739
Disease or Syndrome
Primary trimethylaminuria is characterized by a fishy odor resembling that of rotten or decaying fish that results from excess excretion of trimethylamine in the urine, breath, sweat, and reproductive fluids. No physical symptoms are associated with trimethylaminuria. Affected individuals appear normal and healthy; however, the unpleasant odor often results in social and psychological problems. Symptoms are usually present from birth and may worsen during puberty. In females, symptoms are more severe just before and during menstruation, after taking oral contraceptives, and around the time of menopause.
McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
140765
Concept ID:
C0398568
Disease or Syndrome
McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome (designated as MLS throughout this review) is a multisystem disorder with central nervous system (CNS), neuromuscular, cardiovascular, and hematologic manifestations in males. CNS manifestations are a neurodegenerative basal ganglia disease including (1) movement disorders, (2) cognitive alterations, and (3) psychiatric symptoms. Neuromuscular manifestations include a (mostly subclinical) sensorimotor axonopathy and muscle weakness or atrophy of different degrees. Cardiac manifestations include dilated cardiomyopathy, atrial fibrillation, and tachyarrhythmia. Hematologically, MLS is defined as a specific blood group phenotype (named after the first proband, Hugh McLeod) that results from absent expression of the Kx erythrocyte antigen and weakened expression of Kell blood group antigens. The hematologic manifestations are red blood cell acanthocytosis and compensated hemolysis. Allo-antibodies in the Kell and Kx blood group system can cause strong reactions to transfusions of incompatible blood and severe anemia in affected male newborns of Kell-negative mothers. Females heterozygous for XK pathogenic variants have mosaicism for the Kell and Kx blood group antigens but usually lack CNS and neuromuscular manifestations; however, some heterozygous females may develop clinical manifestations including chorea or late-onset cognitive decline.
Classic homocystinuria
MedGen UID:
199606
Concept ID:
C0751202
Disease or Syndrome
Homocystinuria caused by cystathionine ß-synthase (CBS) deficiency is characterized by involvement of the eye (ectopia lentis and/or severe myopia), skeletal system (excessive height, long limbs, scolioisis, and pectus excavatum), vascular system (thromboembolism), and CNS (developmental delay/intellectual disability). All four ? or only one ? of the systems can be involved; expressivity is variable for all of the clinical signs. It is not unusual for a previously asymptomatic individual to present in adult years with only a thromboembolic event that is often cerebrovascular. Two phenotypic variants are recognized, B6-responsive homocystinuria and B6-non-responsive homocystinuria. B6-responsive homocystinuria is usually milder than the non-responsive variant. Thromboembolism is the major cause of early death and morbidity. IQ in individuals with untreated homocystinuria ranges widely, from 10 to 138. In B6-responsive individuals the mean IQ is 79 versus 57 for those who are B6-non-responsive. Other features that may occur include: seizures, psychiatric problems, extrapyramidal signs (e.g., dystonia), hypopigmentation of the skin and hair, malar flush, livedo reticularis, and pancreatitis.
Classical phenylketonuria
MedGen UID:
199655
Concept ID:
C0751434
Disease or Syndrome
Phenylketonuria (commonly known as PKU) is an inherited disorder that increases the levels of a substance called phenylalanine in the blood. Phenylalanine is a building block of proteins (an amino acid) that is obtained through the diet. It is found in all proteins and in some artificial sweeteners. If PKU is not treated, phenylalanine can build up to harmful levels in the body, causing intellectual disability and other serious health problems.\n\nThe signs and symptoms of PKU vary from mild to severe. The most severe form of this disorder is known as classic PKU. Infants with classic PKU appear normal until they are a few months old. Without treatment, these children develop permanent intellectual disability. Seizures, delayed development, behavioral problems, and psychiatric disorders are also common. Untreated individuals may have a musty or mouse-like odor as a side effect of excess phenylalanine in the body. Children with classic PKU tend to have lighter skin and hair than unaffected family members and are also likely to have skin disorders such as eczema.\n\nLess severe forms of this condition, sometimes called variant PKU and non-PKU hyperphenylalaninemia, have a smaller risk of brain damage. People with very mild cases may not require treatment with a low-phenylalanine diet.\n\nBabies born to mothers who have PKU and uncontrolled phenylalanine levels (women who no longer follow a low-phenylalanine diet) have a significant risk of intellectual disability because they are exposed to very high levels of phenylalanine before birth. These infants may also have a low birth weight and grow more slowly than other children. Other characteristic medical problems include heart defects or other heart problems, an abnormally small head size (microcephaly), and behavioral problems. Women with PKU and uncontrolled phenylalanine levels also have an increased risk of pregnancy loss.
Gomez Lopez Hernandez syndrome
MedGen UID:
163201
Concept ID:
C0795959
Disease or Syndrome
Gomez-Lopez-Hernandez syndrome, also known as cerebellotrigeminal dermal dysplasia, is a rare neurocutaneous syndrome classically characterized by the triad of rhombencephalosynapsis, trigeminal anesthesia, often giving rise to corneal opacities, and bilateral parietal or parietooccipital alopecia, However, trigeminal anesthesia is an inconsistent finding (summary by Sukhudyan et al., 2010).
Mental retardation, X-linked 12
MedGen UID:
901885
Concept ID:
C0796218
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked intellectual disability-short stature-overweight syndrome is a multiple congenital anomalies syndrome characterized by borderline to severe intellectual disability, speech delay, short stature, elevated body mass index, a pattern of truncal obesity (reported in older males), and variable neurologic features (e.g. hypotonia, tremors, gait disturbances, behavioral problems, and seizure disorders). Less common manifestations include microcephaly, microorchidism and/or microphallus. Dysmorphic features have been reported in some patients but no consitent pattern has been noted.
Mental retardation 49, X-linked
MedGen UID:
923000
Concept ID:
C0796221
Disease or Syndrome
Raynaud-Claes syndrome is an X-linked intellectual developmental disorder characterized by borderline to severe intellectual disability and impaired language development. Additional features include behavioral problems, psychiatric disorders, seizures (variable forms), progressive ataxia, brain abnormalities, and facial dysmorphisms. Some heterozygous females are unaffected, whereas others are affected with a severity spectrum similar to that seen in males (summary by Palmer et al. (2018)).
Andersen Tawil syndrome
MedGen UID:
327586
Concept ID:
C1563715
Disease or Syndrome
Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) is characterized by a triad of: episodic flaccid muscle weakness (i.e., periodic paralysis); ventricular arrhythmias and prolonged QT interval; and anomalies including low-set ears, widely spaced eyes, small mandible, fifth-digit clinodactyly, syndactyly, short stature, and scoliosis. Affected individuals present in the first or second decade with either cardiac symptoms (palpitations and/or syncope) or weakness that occurs spontaneously following prolonged rest or following rest after exertion. Mild permanent weakness is common. Mild learning difficulties and a distinct neurocognitive phenotype (i.e., deficits in executive function and abstract reasoning) have been described.
Photomyoclonus, diabetes mellitus, deafness, nephropathy and cerebral dysfunction
MedGen UID:
315660
Concept ID:
C1809475
Disease or Syndrome
Hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, familial, type III
MedGen UID:
322173
Concept ID:
C1833372
Disease or Syndrome
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis 4B
MedGen UID:
320287
Concept ID:
C1834207
Disease or Syndrome
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-4B is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of symptoms in adulthood. It belongs to a group of progressive neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of intracellular autofluorescent lipopigment storage material in the brain and other tissues. Several different forms have been described according to age of onset (see, e.g., CLN3, 204200). Individuals with the adult form, sometimes referred to as Kufs disease, develop psychiatric manifestations, seizures, cerebellar ataxia, and cognitive decline. Retinal degeneration is usually not present (summary by Benitez et al., 2011 and Velinov et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CLN, see CLN1 (256730).
Myoclonic dystonia 11
MedGen UID:
331778
Concept ID:
C1834570
Disease or Syndrome
SGCE myoclonus-dystonia (SGCE-M-D) is a movement disorder characterized by a combination of rapid, brief muscle contractions (myoclonus) and/or sustained twisting and repetitive movements that result in abnormal postures (dystonia). The myoclonic jerks typical of SGCE-M-D most often affect the neck, trunk, and upper limbs with less common involvement of the legs. Approximately 50% of affected individuals have additional focal or segmental dystonia, presenting as cervical dystonia and/or writer's cramp. Non-motor features may include alcohol abuse, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and anxiety disorders. Symptom onset is usually in the first decade of life and almost always by age 20 years, but ranges from age six months to 80 years. Most affected adults report a dramatic reduction in myoclonus in response to alcohol ingestion. SGCE-M-D is compatible with an active life of normal span.
Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions 1
MedGen UID:
371919
Concept ID:
C1834846
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 27
MedGen UID:
373075
Concept ID:
C1836383
Disease or Syndrome
The hereditary ataxias are a group of genetic disorders characterized by slowly progressive incoordination of gait and often associated with poor coordination of hands, speech, and eye movements. Frequently, atrophy of the cerebellum occurs. In this GeneReview the hereditary ataxias are categorized by mode of inheritance and gene (or chromosome locus) in which pathogenic variants occur.
Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions 3
MedGen UID:
373087
Concept ID:
C1836439
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia is characterized by multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle. The most common clinical features include adult onset of weakness of the external eye muscles and exercise intolerance. Patients with C10ORF2-linked adPEO may have other clinical features including proximal muscle weakness, ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, cardiomyopathy, cataracts, depression, and endocrine abnormalities (summary by Fratter et al., 2010). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia, see PEOA1 (157640). PEO caused by mutations in the POLG gene (174763) are associated with more complicated phenotypes than those forms caused by mutations in the SLC25A4 (103220) or C10ORF2 genes (Lamantea et al., 2002).
Fragile X tremor/ataxia syndrome
MedGen UID:
333403
Concept ID:
C1839780
Disease or Syndrome
FMR1 disorders include fragile X syndrome (FXS), fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), and fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI). Fragile X syndrome occurs in individuals with an FMR1 full mutation or other loss-of-function variant and is nearly always characterized in affected males by developmental delay and intellectual disability along with a variety of behavioral issues. Autism spectrum disorder is present in 50%-70% of individuals with FXS. Affected males may have characteristic craniofacial features (which become more obvious with age) and medical problems including hypotonia, gastroesophageal reflux, strabismus, seizures, sleep disorders, joint laxity, pes planus, scoliosis, and recurrent otitis media. Adults may have mitral valve prolapse or aortic root dilatation. The physical and behavioral features seen in males with FXS have been reported in females heterozygous for the FMR1 full mutation, but with lower frequency and milder involvement. FXTAS occurs in individuals who have an FMR1 premutation and is characterized by late-onset, progressive cerebellar ataxia and intention tremor followed by cognitive impairment. Psychiatric disorders are common. Age of onset is typically between 60 and 65 years and is more common among males who are hemizygous for the premutation (40%) than among females who are heterozygous for the premutation (16%-20%). FXPOI, defined as hypergonadotropic hypogonadism before age 40 years, has been observed in 20% of women who carry a premutation allele compared to 1% in the general population.
Sensory ataxic neuropathy-dysarthria-ophthalmoparesis syndrome
MedGen UID:
375302
Concept ID:
C1843851
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Syndromic X-linked intellectual disability Lubs type
MedGen UID:
337496
Concept ID:
C1846058
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
MECP2 duplication syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by early-onset hypotonia, feeding difficulty, gastrointestinal manifestations including gastroesophageal reflux and constipation, delayed psychomotor development leading to severe intellectual disability, poor speech development, progressive spasticity, recurrent respiratory infections (in ~75% of affected individuals), and seizures (in ~50%). MECP2 duplication syndrome is 100% penetrant in males. Occasionally females have been described with a MECP2 duplication and a range of findings from mild intellectual disability to a phenotype similar to that seen in males. In addition to the core features, autistic behaviors, nonspecific neuroradiologic findings on brain MRI, mottled skin, and urogenital anomalies have been observed in several affected boys.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 17
MedGen UID:
337637
Concept ID:
C1846707
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17) is characterized by ataxia, dementia, and involuntary movements, including chorea and dystonia. Psychiatric symptoms, pyramidal signs, and rigidity are common. The age of onset ranges from three to 55 years. Individuals with full-penetrance alleles develop neurologic and/or psychiatric symptoms by age 50 years. Ataxia and psychiatric abnormalities are frequently the initial findings, followed by involuntary movement, parkinsonism, dementia, and pyramidal signs. Brain MRI shows variable atrophy of the cerebrum, brain stem, and cerebellum. The clinical features correlate with the length of the polyglutamine expansion but are not absolutely predictive of the clinical course.
Huntington disease-like 2
MedGen UID:
341120
Concept ID:
C1847987
Disease or Syndrome
Huntington disease-like 2 (HDL2) typically presents in midlife with a relentless progressive triad of movement, emotional, and cognitive abnormalities which lead to death within ten to 20 years. HDL2 cannot be differentiated from Huntington disease clinically. Neurologic abnormalities include chorea, hypokinesia (rigidity, bradykinesia), dysarthria, and hyperreflexia in the later stages of the disease. There is a strong correlation between the duration of the disease and the progression of the motor and cognitive disorder.
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis 1
MedGen UID:
340540
Concept ID:
C1850451
Disease or Syndrome
The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL; CLN) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the intracellular accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment storage material in different patterns ultrastructurally. The lipopigment pattern seen most often in CLN1 is referred to as granular osmiophilic deposits (GROD). The patterns most often observed in CLN2 and CLN3 are 'curvilinear' and 'fingerprint' profiles, respectively. CLN4, CLN5, CLN6, CLN7, and CLN8 show mixed combinations of granular, curvilinear, fingerprint, and rectilinear profiles. The clinical course includes progressive dementia, seizures, and progressive visual failure (Mole et al., 2005). Zeman and Dyken (1969) referred to these conditions as the 'neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses.' Goebel (1995) provided a comprehensive review of the NCLs and noted that they are possibly the most common group of neurodegenerative diseases in children. Mole et al. (2005) provided a detailed clinical and genetic review of the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. Genetic Heterogeneity of Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis See also CLN2 (204500), caused by mutation in the TPP1 gene (607998) on chromosome 11p15; CLN3 (204200), caused by mutation in the CLN3 gene (607042) on 16p12; CLN4A (204300), caused by mutation in the CLN6 gene (606725) on 15q21; CLN4B (162350), caused by mutation in the DNAJC5 gene (611203) on 20q13; CLN5 (256731), caused by mutation in the CLN5 gene (608102) on 13q22; CLN6 (601780), caused by mutation in the CLN6 gene (602780) on 15q21; CLN7 (610951), caused by mutation in the MFSD8 gene (611124) on 4q28; CLN8 (600143) and the Northern epilepsy variant of CLN8 (610003), caused by mutation in the CLN8 gene (607837) on 8p23; CLN10 (610127), caused by mutation in the CTSD gene (116840) on 11p15; CLN11 (614706), caused by mutation in the GRN gene (138945) on 17q21; CLN13 (615362), caused by mutation in the CTSF gene (603539) on 11q13; and CLN14 (611726), caused by mutation in the KCTD7 gene (611725) on 7q11. CLN9 (609055) has not been molecularly characterized. A disorder that was formerly designated neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-12 (CLN12) is now considered to be a variable form of Kufor-Rakeb syndrome (KRS; 606693).
Dystonia 1
MedGen UID:
338823
Concept ID:
C1851945
Disease or Syndrome
DYT1 early-onset isolated dystonia typically presents in childhood or adolescence and only on occasion in adulthood. Dystonic muscle contractions causing posturing or irregular tremor of a leg or arm are the most common presenting findings. Dystonia is usually first apparent with specific actions such as writing or walking. Over time, the contractions frequently (but not invariably) become evident with less specific actions and spread to other body regions. No other neurologic abnormalities are present. Disease severity varies considerably even within the same family. Isolated writer's cramp may be the only sign.
Major affective disorder 1
MedGen UID:
377615
Concept ID:
C1852197
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition that causes extreme shifts in mood, energy, and behavior. This disorder most often appears in late adolescence or early adulthood, although symptoms can begin at any time of life.\n\nPeople with bipolar disorder experience both dramatic "highs," called manic episodes, and "lows," called depressive episodes. These episodes can last from hours to weeks, and many people have no symptoms between episodes.\n\nManic episodes are characterized by increased energy and activity, irritability, restlessness, an inability to sleep, and reckless behavior. Some people with bipolar disorder experience hypomanic episodes, which are similar to but less extreme than manic episodes.\n\nDepressive episodes are marked by low energy and activity, a feeling of hopelessness, and an inability to perform everyday tasks. People with bipolar disorder often have repeated thoughts of death and suicide, and they have a much greater risk of dying by suicide than the general population.\n\nBipolar disorder often occurs with other mental health conditions, including anxiety disorders (such as panic attacks), behavioral disorders (such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder), and substance abuse.\n\nManic and depressive episodes can include psychotic symptoms, such as false perceptions (hallucinations) or strongly held false beliefs (delusions). Mixed episodes, which have features of manic and depressive episodes at the same time, also occur in some affected individuals.\n\nBipolar disorder is classified into several types based on the mood changes that occur. Bipolar I involves manic episodes, which can be accompanied by psychotic symptoms, and hypomanic or depressive episodes. Bipolar II involves hypomanic episodes and depressive episodes. Cyclothymic disorder involves hypomanic episodes and depressive episodes that are typically less severe than those in bipolar I or bipolar II.
Parkinson disease 6, autosomal recessive early-onset
MedGen UID:
342982
Concept ID:
C1853833
Disease or Syndrome
PINK1 type of young-onset Parkinson disease is characterized by early onset (mean age 33 years) of tremor, bradykinesia, and rigidity that are often indistinguishable from other causes of Parkinson disease. Lower-limb dystonia may be a presenting sign. Postural instability, hyperreflexia, abnormal behavior, and psychiatric manifestations have been described. The disease is usually slowly progressive. Individuals have a marked and sustained response to oral administration of levodopa (L-dopa), frequently associated with L-dopa-induced fluctuations and dyskinesias.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 14
MedGen UID:
343106
Concept ID:
C1854369
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14) is characterized by slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, and nystagmus. Axial myoclonus, cognitive impairment, tremor, and sensory loss may also be observed. Parkinsonian features including rigidity and tremor have been described in some families. Findings seen in other ataxia disorders (e.g., dysphagia, dysphonia) may also occur in SCA14. The average age of onset is in the 30s, with a range from childhood to the seventh decade. Life span is not shortened.
ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia 1
MedGen UID:
347456
Concept ID:
C1857451
Disease or Syndrome
ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH) is an endogenous form of adrenal Cushing syndrome characterized by multiple bilateral adrenocortical nodules that cause a striking enlargement of the adrenal glands. Although some familial cases have been reported, the vast majority of AIMAH cases are sporadic. Patients typically present in the fifth and sixth decades of life, approximately 10 years later than most patients with other causes of Cushing syndrome (Swain et al., 1998; Christopoulos et al., 2005). Approximately 10 to 15% of adrenal Cushing syndrome is due to primary bilateral ACTH-independent adrenocortical pathology. The 2 main subtypes are AIMAH and primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD, see 610489), which is often a component of the Carney complex (160980) and associated with mutations in the PRKAR1A gene (188830) on chromosome 17q23-q24. AIMAH is rare, representing less than 1% of endogenous causes of Cushing syndrome (Swain et al., 1998; Christopoulos et al., 2005). See also ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (615830) due to somatic mutation in the PRKACA gene (601639). Cushing 'disease' (219090) is an ACTH-dependent disorder caused in most cases by pituitary adenomas that secrete excessive ACTH. Genetic Heterogeneity of ACTH-Independent Macronodular Adrenal Hyperplasia AIMAH2 (615954) is caused by germline mutation of 1 allele of the ARMC5 gene (615549) coupled with a somatic mutation in the other allele.
Wolfram syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
347604
Concept ID:
C1858028
Disease or Syndrome
Wolfram syndrome-2 is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by diabetes mellitus, high frequency sensorineural hearing loss, optic atrophy or neuropathy, and defective platelet aggregation resulting in peptic ulcer bleeding (summary by Mozzillo et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Wolfram syndrome, see WFS1 (222300).
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 12
MedGen UID:
347653
Concept ID:
C1858501
Disease or Syndrome
The hereditary ataxias are a group of genetic disorders characterized by slowly progressive incoordination of gait and often associated with poor coordination of hands, speech, and eye movements. Frequently, atrophy of the cerebellum occurs. In this GeneReview the hereditary ataxias are categorized by mode of inheritance and gene (or chromosome locus) in which pathogenic variants occur.
Celiac disease 1
MedGen UID:
395227
Concept ID:
C1859310
Finding
Celiac disease is a systemic autoimmune disease that can be associated with gastrointestinal findings (diarrhea, malabsorption, abdominal pain and distension, bloating, vomiting, and weight loss) and/or highly variable non-gastrointestinal findings (dermatitis herpetiformis, chronic fatigue, joint pain/inflammation, iron deficiency anemia, migraines, depression, attention-deficit disorder, epilepsy, osteoporosis/osteopenia, infertility and/or recurrent fetal loss, vitamin deficiencies, short stature, failure to thrive, delayed puberty, dental enamel defects, and autoimmune disorders). Classic celiac disease, characterized by mild to severe gastrointestinal symptoms, is less common than non-classic celiac disease, characterized by absence of gastrointestinal symptoms.
Huntington disease-like 1
MedGen UID:
355137
Concept ID:
C1864112
Disease or Syndrome
Genetic prion disease generally manifests with cognitive difficulties, ataxia, and myoclonus (abrupt jerking movements of muscle groups and/or entire limbs). The order of appearance and/or predominance of these features and other associated neurologic and psychiatric findings vary. The three major phenotypes of genetic prion disease are genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (gCJD), fatal familial insomnia (FFI), and Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome. Although these phenotypes display overlapping clinical and pathologic features, recognition of these phenotypes can be useful when providing affected individuals and their families with information about the expected clinical course. The age at onset typically ranges from 50 to 60 years. The disease course ranges from a few months in gCJD and FFI to a few (up to 4, and in rare cases up to 10) years in GSS syndrome.
Epilepsy, nocturnal frontal lobe, type 2
MedGen UID:
351053
Concept ID:
C1864125
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is characterized by clusters of nocturnal motor seizures, which are often stereotyped and brief (5 seconds to 5 minutes). They vary from simple arousals from sleep to dramatic, often bizarre hyperkinetic events with tonic or dystonic features. Affected individuals may experience aura. Retained awareness during seizures is common. A minority of individuals experience daytime seizures. Onset ranges from infancy to adulthood. About 80% of individuals develop ADNFLE in the first two decades of life; mean age of onset is ten years. Clinical neurologic examination is normal and intellect is usually preserved, but reduced intellect, psychiatric comorbidity, or cognitive deficits may occur. Within a family, the manifestations of the disorder may vary considerably. ADNFLE is lifelong but not progressive. As an individual reaches middle age, attacks may become milder and less frequent.
Pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, primary, 1
MedGen UID:
400627
Concept ID:
C1864846
Disease or Syndrome
Primary pigmented micronodular adrenocortical disease is a form of ACTH-independent adrenal hyperplasia resulting in Cushing syndrome. It is usually seen as a manifestation of the Carney complex (CNC1; 160980), a multiple neoplasia syndrome. However, PPNAD can also occur in isolation (Groussin et al., 2002). Genetic Heterogeneity of Primary Pigmented Micronodular Adrenocortical Disease See also PPNAD2 (610475), caused by mutation in the PDE11A gene (604961) on chromosome 2q31; PPNAD3 (614190), caused by mutation in the PDE8B gene (603390) on chromosome 5q13; and PPNAD4 (615830), caused by a duplication on chromosome 19p13 that includes the PRKACA gene (601639).
Pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, primary, 2
MedGen UID:
355843
Concept ID:
C1864851
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia 4, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
401097
Concept ID:
C1866855
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia 4 (SPG4; also known as SPAST-HSP) is characterized by insidiously progressive bilateral lower-limb gait spasticity. More than 50% of affected individuals have some weakness in the legs and impaired vibration sense at the ankles. Sphincter disturbances are very common. Onset is insidious, mostly in young adulthood, although symptoms may start as early as age one year and as late as age 76 years. Intrafamilial variation is considerable.
Leukodystrophy, adult-onset, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
356995
Concept ID:
C1868512
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant leukodystrophy with autonomic disease (ADLD) is a slowly progressive disorder of central nervous system white matter characterized by onset of autonomic dysfunction in the fourth to fifth decade, followed in months to years by pyramidal and cerebellar involvement. Autonomic dysfunction can include bladder dysfunction, constipation, postural hypotension, feeding difficulties, erectile dysfunction, and (less often) impaired sweating. Pyramidal signs are often more prominent in the lower extremities (i.e., spastic weakness, hypertonia, clonus, brisk deep tendon reflexes, and bilateral Babinski signs). Cerebellar signs typically appear at the same time as the pyramidal signs and can include gait ataxia, dysdiadochokinesia, intention tremor, dysmetria, and nystagmus. Although cognitive function is usually preserved or only mildly impaired early in the disease course, dementia and psychiatric manifestations can occur as late manifestations. Affected individuals may survive for decades after onset.
Perry syndrome
MedGen UID:
357007
Concept ID:
C1868594
Disease or Syndrome
Perry syndrome is characterized by parkinsonism, hypoventilation, depression, and weight loss. The mean age at onset is 49 years; the mean disease duration is five years. Parkinsonism and psychiatric changes (depression, apathy, character changes, and withdrawal) tend to occur early; severe weight loss and hypoventilation manifest later.
Parkinson disease 1
MedGen UID:
357008
Concept ID:
C1868595
Disease or Syndrome
Parkinson disease is the second most common neurogenic disorder after Alzheimer disease (AD; 104300), affecting approximately 1% of the population over age 50. Clinical manifestations include resting tremor, muscular rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability. Additional features are characteristic postural abnormalities, dysautonomia, dystonic cramps, and dementia (Polymeropoulos et al., 1996). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Parkinson disease, see 168600.
Dystonia 12
MedGen UID:
358384
Concept ID:
C1868681
Disease or Syndrome
ATP1A3-related neurologic disorders represent a clinical continuum in which at least three distinct phenotypes have been delineated: rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP); alternating hemiplegia of childhood (ACH); and cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss (CAPOS). However, some affected individuals have intermediate phenotypes or only a few features that do not fit well into one of these major phenotypes. RDP has been characterized by: abrupt onset of dystonia over days to weeks with parkinsonism (primarily bradykinesia and postural instability); common bulbar involvement; and absence or minimal response to an adequate trial of L-dopa therapy, with few exceptions. Often fever, physiologic stress, or alcoholic binges trigger the onset of symptoms. After their initial appearance, symptoms often stabilize with little improvement; occasionally second episodes occur with abrupt worsening of symptoms. Rarely, affected individuals have reported a more gradual onset of symptoms over weeks to months. Anxiety, depression, and seizures have been reported. Age of onset ranges from four to 55 years, although a childhood variation of RDP with onset between ages nine and 14 months has been reported. AHC is a complex neurodevelopmental syndrome most frequently manifesting in infancy or early childhood with paroxysmal episodic neurologic dysfunction including alternating hemiparesis or dystonia, quadriparesis, seizure-like episodes, and oculomotor abnormalities. Episodes can last for minutes, hours, days, or even weeks. Remission of symptoms occurs with sleep and immediately after awakening. Over time, persistent neurologic deficits including oculomotor apraxia, ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, parkinsonism, and cognitive and behavioral dysfunction develop in the majority of those affected; more than 50% develop epilepsy in addition to their episodic movement disorder phenotype. CAPOS (cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss) syndrome is characterized by episodes of ataxic encephalopathy and/or weakness during and after a febrile illness. Onset is between ages six months and four years. Some acute symptoms resolve; progression of sensory losses and severity vary.
Multiple sclerosis susceptibility
MedGen UID:
358269
Concept ID:
C1868685
Finding
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) with various degrees of axonal damage. MS affects mainly young adults with predominance for females. The disorder often leads to substantial disability (summary by Bomprezzi et al., 2003). Genetic Heterogeneity of Susceptibility to Multiple Sclerosis Additional MS susceptibility loci include MS2 (612594) on chromosome 10p15, MS3 (612595) on chromosome 5p13, MS4 (612596) on chromosome 1p36, and MS5 (614810), conferred by variation in the TNFRSF1A gene (191190) on chromosome 12p13.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10
MedGen UID:
369786
Concept ID:
C1963674
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) is characterized by slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia that usually starts as poor balance and unsteady gait, followed by upper-limb ataxia, scanning dysarthria, and dysphagia. Abnormal tracking eye movements are common. Recurrent seizures after the onset of gait ataxia have been reported with variable frequencies among different families. Some individuals have cognitive dysfunction, behavioral disturbances, mood disorders, mild pyramidal signs, and peripheral neuropathy. Age of onset ranges from 12 to 48 years.
Macrocephalus
MedGen UID:
745757
Concept ID:
C2243051
Finding
Occipitofrontal (head) circumference greater than 97th centile compared to appropriate, age matched, sex-matched normal standards. Alternatively, a apparently increased size of the cranium.
Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions 5
MedGen UID:
413981
Concept ID:
C2751319
Disease or Syndrome
RRM2B-related mitochondrial disease can be grouped by disease pathogenesis, phenotype, and mode of inheritance into two major types: mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and multiple mtDNA deletions. Mitochondrial DNA depletion usually manifests as severe multisystem disease (encephalomyopathy with proximal renal tubulopathy) and is often fatal in early life. Inheritance is autosomal recessive. Multiple mtDNA deletions cause tissue-specific cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency. Inheritance can be either autosomal recessive (with progressive external ophthalmoplegia [PEO] and multisystem involvement manifesting during early childhood/adulthood) or autosomal dominant (with less severe, often tissue-specific manifestations [e.g., chronic PEO] developing in later adulthood). Other rarer phenotypes are Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) and mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE).
Parkinson disease 14
MedGen UID:
414488
Concept ID:
C2751842
Disease or Syndrome
Generally, Parkinson disease that begins after age 50 is called late-onset disease. The condition is described as early-onset disease if signs and symptoms begin before age 50. Early-onset cases that begin before age 20 are sometimes referred to as juvenile-onset Parkinson disease.\n\nParkinson disease can also affect emotions and thinking ability (cognition). Some affected individuals develop psychiatric conditions such as depression and visual hallucinations. People with Parkinson disease also have an increased risk of developing dementia, which is a decline in intellectual functions including judgment and memory.\n\nOften the first symptom of Parkinson disease is trembling or shaking (tremor) of a limb, especially when the body is at rest. Typically, the tremor begins on one side of the body, usually in one hand. Tremors can also affect the arms, legs, feet, and face. Other characteristic symptoms of Parkinson disease include rigidity or stiffness of the limbs and torso, slow movement (bradykinesia) or an inability to move (akinesia), and impaired balance and coordination (postural instability). These symptoms worsen slowly over time.\n\nParkinson disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system. The disorder affects several regions of the brain, especially an area called the substantia nigra that controls balance and movement.
Hypertryptophanemia, familial
MedGen UID:
419177
Concept ID:
C2931837
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital hypertryptophanemia, which is accompanied by hyperserotonemia, does not appear to have significant clinical consequences (Ferreira et al., 2017).
Parkinson disease, late-onset
MedGen UID:
463618
Concept ID:
C3160718
Disease or Syndrome
Generally, Parkinson disease that begins after age 50 is called late-onset disease. The condition is described as early-onset disease if signs and symptoms begin before age 50. Early-onset cases that begin before age 20 are sometimes referred to as juvenile-onset Parkinson disease.\n\nParkinson disease can also affect emotions and thinking ability (cognition). Some affected individuals develop psychiatric conditions such as depression and visual hallucinations. People with Parkinson disease also have an increased risk of developing dementia, which is a decline in intellectual functions including judgment and memory.\n\nOften the first symptom of Parkinson disease is trembling or shaking (tremor) of a limb, especially when the body is at rest. Typically, the tremor begins on one side of the body, usually in one hand. Tremors can also affect the arms, legs, feet, and face. Other characteristic symptoms of Parkinson disease include rigidity or stiffness of the limbs and torso, slow movement (bradykinesia) or an inability to move (akinesia), and impaired balance and coordination (postural instability). These symptoms worsen slowly over time.\n\nParkinson disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system. The disorder affects several regions of the brain, especially an area called the substantia nigra that controls balance and movement.
Wolfram-like syndrome, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
481988
Concept ID:
C3280358
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant Wolfram-like syndrome is characterized by the clinical triad of congenital progressive hearing impairment, diabetes mellitus, and optic atrophy. The hearing impairment, which is usually diagnosed in the first decade of life, is relatively constant and alters mainly low- and middle-frequency ranges (summary by Valero et al., 2008). Wolfram syndrome (WFS1; 222300) is an autosomal recessive allelic disorder characterized by optic atrophy, diabetes mellitus, hearing loss, and diabetes insipidus, and is caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutation in the WFS1 gene. An autosomal dominant syndrome involving optic atrophy with or without deafness, ophthalmoplegia, myopathy, ataxia, and neuropathy (125250), is caused by heterozygous mutation in the OPA1 gene (605290).
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation 4
MedGen UID:
482001
Concept ID:
C3280371
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial membrane protein-associated neurodegeneration (MPAN) is characterized initially by gait changes followed by progressive spastic paresis, progressive dystonia (which may be limited to the hands and feet or more generalized), neuropsychiatric abnormalities (emotional lability, depression, anxiety, impulsivity, compulsions, hallucinations, perseveration, inattention, and hyperactivity), and cognitive decline. Additional early findings can include dysphagia, dysarthria, optic atrophy, axonal neuropathy, parkinsonism, and bowel/bladder incontinence. Survival is usually well into adulthood. End-stage disease is characterized by severe dementia, spasticity, dystonia, and parkinsonism.
Alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase deficiency
MedGen UID:
482058
Concept ID:
C3280428
Disease or Syndrome
AMACR deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive peroxisomal disorder characterized by adult onset of variable neurodegenerative symptoms affecting the central and peripheral nervous systems. Features may include seizures, visual failure, sensorimotor neuropathy, spasticity, migraine, and white matter hyperintensities on brain imaging. Serum pristanic acid and C27 bile acid intermediates are increased (summary by Smith et al., 2010).
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency, nuclear type 1
MedGen UID:
762097
Concept ID:
C3541471
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive mitochondrial complex III deficiency is a severe multisystem disorder with onset at birth of lactic acidosis, hypotonia, hypoglycemia, failure to thrive, encephalopathy, and delayed psychomotor development. Visceral involvement, including hepatopathy and renal tubulopathy, may also occur. Many patients die in early childhood, but some may show longer survival (de Lonlay et al., 2001; De Meirleir et al., 2003). Genetic Heterogeneity of Mitochondrial Complex III Deficiency Mitochondrial complex III deficiency can be caused by mutation in several different nuclear-encoded genes. See MC3DN2 (615157), caused by mutation in the TTC19 gene (613814) on chromosome 17p12; MC3DN3 (615158), caused by mutation in the UQCRB gene (191330) on chromosome 8q; MC3DN4 (615159), caused by mutation in the UQCRQ gene (612080) on chromosome 5q31; MC3DN5 (615160), caused by mutation in the UQCRC2 gene (191329) on chromosome 16p12; MC3DN6 (615453), caused by mutation in the CYC1 gene (123980) on chromosome 8q24; MC3DN7 (615824), caused by mutation in the UQCC2 gene (614461) on chromosome 6p21; MC3DN8 (615838), caused by mutation in the LYRM7 gene (615831) on chromosome 5q23; MC3DN9 (616111), caused by mutation in the UQCC3 gene (616097) on chromosome 11q12; and MC3DN10 (618775), caused by mutation in the UQCRFS1 gene (191327) on chromosome 19q12. See also MTYCB (516020) for a discussion of a milder phenotype associated with isolated mitochondrial complex III deficiency and mutations in a mitochondrial-encoded gene.
Epilepsy, nocturnal frontal lobe, 5
MedGen UID:
767220
Concept ID:
C3554306
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is characterized by clusters of nocturnal motor seizures, which are often stereotyped and brief (5 seconds to 5 minutes). They vary from simple arousals from sleep to dramatic, often bizarre hyperkinetic events with tonic or dystonic features. Affected individuals may experience aura. Retained awareness during seizures is common. A minority of individuals experience daytime seizures. Onset ranges from infancy to adulthood. About 80% of individuals develop ADNFLE in the first two decades of life; mean age of onset is ten years. Clinical neurologic examination is normal and intellect is usually preserved, but reduced intellect, psychiatric comorbidity, or cognitive deficits may occur. Within a family, the manifestations of the disorder may vary considerably. ADNFLE is lifelong but not progressive. As an individual reaches middle age, attacks may become milder and less frequent.
Basal ganglia calcification, idiopathic, 4
MedGen UID:
767235
Concept ID:
C3554321
Disease or Syndrome
Primary familial brain calcification (PFBC) is a neurodegenerative disorder with characteristic calcium deposits in the basal ganglia and other brain areas visualized on neuroimaging. Most affected individuals are in good health during childhood and young adulthood and typically present in the fourth to fifth decade with a gradually progressive movement disorder and neuropsychiatric symptoms. The movement disorder first manifests as clumsiness, fatigability, unsteady gait, slow or slurred speech, dysphagia, involuntary movements, or muscle cramping. Neuropsychiatric symptoms, often the first or most prominent manifestations, range from mild difficulty with concentration and memory to changes in personality and/or behavior, to psychosis and dementia. Seizures of various types occur frequently, some individuals experience chronic headache and vertigo; urinary urgency or incontinence may be present.
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency, nuclear type 2
MedGen UID:
767519
Concept ID:
C3554605
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency nuclear type 2 is an autosomal recessive severe neurodegenerative disorder that usually presents in childhood, but may show later onset, even in adulthood. Affected individuals have motor disability, with ataxia, apraxia, dystonia, and dysarthria, associated with necrotic lesions throughout the brain. Most patients also have cognitive impairment and axonal neuropathy and become severely disabled later in life (summary by Ghezzi et al., 2011). The disorder may present clinically as spinocerebellar ataxia or Leigh syndrome, or with psychiatric disturbances (Morino et al., 2014; Atwal, 2014; Nogueira et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex III deficiency, see MC3DN1 (124000).
Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids
MedGen UID:
777989
Concept ID:
C3711381
Disease or Syndrome
CSF1R-related adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) is characterized by executive dysfunction, memory decline, personality changes, motor impairments, and seizures. A frontal lobe syndrome (e.g., loss of judgment, lack of social inhibitors, lack of insight, and motor persistence) usually appears early in the disease course. The mean age of onset is usually in the fourth decade. Affected individuals eventually become bedridden with spasticity and rigidity. The disease course ranges from two to 30 or more years (mean: 8 years).
Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal, 13
MedGen UID:
811566
Concept ID:
C3715049
Disease or Syndrome
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-13 is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by adult onset of progressive cognitive decline and motor dysfunction leading to dementia and often early death. Some patients develop seizures. Neurons show abnormal accumulation of autofluorescent material (summary by Smith et al., 2013). Adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis is sometimes referred to as Kufs disease. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN), see CLN1 (256730).
Macrocephaly/megalencephaly syndrome, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
812742
Concept ID:
C3806412
Disease or Syndrome
Macrocephaly refers to an abnormally enlarged head inclusive of the scalp, cranial bones, and intracranial contents. Macrocephaly may be due to megalencephaly (true enlargement of the brain parenchyma), and the 2 terms are often used interchangeably in the genetic literature (reviews by Olney, 2007 and Williams et al., 2008). Autosomal recessive macrocephaly/megalencephaly syndrome is characterized by an enlarged cranium apparent at birth or in early childhood. Affected individuals have intellectual disability and may have dysmorphic facial features resulting from the macrocephaly (summary by Alfaiz et al., 2014).
Cerebellar ataxia, deafness, and narcolepsy, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
813625
Concept ID:
C3807295
Disease or Syndrome
ADCADN is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by adult onset of progressive cerebellar ataxia, narcolepsy/cataplexy, sensorineural deafness, and dementia. More variable features include optic atrophy, sensory neuropathy, psychosis, and depression (summary by Winkelmann et al., 2012).
Familial advanced sleep phase syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
813657
Concept ID:
C3807327
Disease or Syndrome
Advanced sleep phase syndrome is characterized by very early sleep onset and offset (summary by Jones et al., 1999). Genetic Heterogeneity of Advanced Sleep Phase Syndrome See also FASPS2 (615224), caused by mutation in the CSNK1D gene (600864) on chromosome 17q25, and FASPS3 (616882), caused by mutation in the PER3 gene (603427) on chromosome 1p36.
Idiopathic basal ganglia calcification 5
MedGen UID:
815975
Concept ID:
C3809645
Disease or Syndrome
Primary familial brain calcification (PFBC) is a neurodegenerative disorder with characteristic calcium deposits in the basal ganglia and other brain areas visualized on neuroimaging. Most affected individuals are in good health during childhood and young adulthood and typically present in the fourth to fifth decade with a gradually progressive movement disorder and neuropsychiatric symptoms. The movement disorder first manifests as clumsiness, fatigability, unsteady gait, slow or slurred speech, dysphagia, involuntary movements, or muscle cramping. Neuropsychiatric symptoms, often the first or most prominent manifestations, range from mild difficulty with concentration and memory to changes in personality and/or behavior, to psychosis and dementia. Seizures of various types occur frequently, some individuals experience chronic headache and vertigo; urinary urgency or incontinence may be present.
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation 6
MedGen UID:
816560
Concept ID:
C3810230
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation refers to a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive motor and cognitive dysfunction beginning in childhood or young adulthood. Patients show extrapyramidal motor signs, such as spasticity, dystonia, and parkinsonism. Brain imaging shows iron accumulation in the basal ganglia (summary by Dusi et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of NBIA, see NBIA1 (234200).
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and/or frontotemporal dementia 1
MedGen UID:
854771
Concept ID:
C3888102
Disease or Syndrome
C9orf72 frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (C9orf72-FTD/ALS) is characterized most often by frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and upper and lower motor neuron disease (MND); however, atypical presentations also occur. Age at onset is usually between 50 and 64 years (range: 20-91 years) irrespective of the presenting manifestations, which may be pure FTD, pure amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or a combination of the two phenotypes. The clinical presentation is highly heterogeneous and may differ between and within families, causing an unpredictable pattern and age of onset of clinical manifestations. The presence of MND correlates with an earlier age of onset and a worse overall prognosis.
Pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, primary, 4
MedGen UID:
862862
Concept ID:
C4014425
Disease or Syndrome
Cushing syndrome is a clinical designation for the systemic signs and symptoms arising from excess cortisol production. Affected individuals typically show hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, central obesity, osteoporosis, and sometimes depression. Corticotropin-independent Cushing syndrome results from autonomous cortisol production by the adrenal glands, often associated with adrenocortical tumors. Adrenocortical tumors are most common in adult females (summary by Cao et al., 2014; Sato et al., 2014).
Leukoencephalopathy, progressive, with ovarian failure
MedGen UID:
863025
Concept ID:
C4014588
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive leukoencephalopathy with ovarian failure is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of motor and cognitive skills, usually with onset in young adulthood. Some patients may have a history of delayed motor development or learning difficulties in early childhood. Neurologic decline is severe, usually resulting in gait difficulties, ataxia, spasticity, and cognitive decline and dementia. Most patients lose speech and become wheelchair-bound or bedridden. Brain MRI shows progressive white matter signal abnormalities in the deep white matter. Affected females develop premature ovarian failure (summary by Dallabona et al., 2014).
Acth-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia 2
MedGen UID:
863240
Concept ID:
C4014803
Disease or Syndrome
ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia-2 is an autosomal dominant tumor susceptibility with syndromic incomplete penetrance, as a second hit to the ARMC5 gene is required to develop macronodular hyperplasia (Assie et al., 2013).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 1
MedGen UID:
897191
Concept ID:
C4225153
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Advanced sleep phase syndrome, familial, 3
MedGen UID:
909447
Concept ID:
C4225169
Disease or Syndrome
Advanced sleep phase syndrome is characterized by early sleep time (sleep onset) and early morning awakening (sleep offset) (summary by Zhang et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of advanced sleep phase syndrome, see FASPS1 (604348).
Spinocerebellar ataxia 42
MedGen UID:
902592
Concept ID:
C4225205
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia-42 is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized predominantly by gait instability and additional cerebellar signs such as dysarthria, nystagmus, and saccadic pursuits. The age at onset and severity of the disorder is highly variable; it is slowly progressive (summary by Coutelier et al., 2015). For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400).
Kosaki overgrowth syndrome
MedGen UID:
896409
Concept ID:
C4225270
Disease or Syndrome
Kosaki overgrowth syndrome is characterized by a facial gestalt involving prominent forehead, proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures, broad nasal bridge, thin upper lip, and pointed chin. Affected individuals are tall, with an elongated lower segment, hands, and feet. Skin is hyperelastic and fragile, and there is progressive neurologic deterioration with white matter lesions on brain imaging (Takenouchi et al., 2015).
Basal ganglia calcification, idiopathic, 6
MedGen UID:
901404
Concept ID:
C4225335
Disease or Syndrome
Primary familial brain calcification (PFBC) is a neurodegenerative disorder with characteristic calcium deposits in the basal ganglia and other brain areas visualized on neuroimaging. Most affected individuals are in good health during childhood and young adulthood and typically present in the fourth to fifth decade with a gradually progressive movement disorder and neuropsychiatric symptoms. The movement disorder first manifests as clumsiness, fatigability, unsteady gait, slow or slurred speech, dysphagia, involuntary movements, or muscle cramping. Neuropsychiatric symptoms, often the first or most prominent manifestations, range from mild difficulty with concentration and memory to changes in personality and/or behavior, to psychosis and dementia. Seizures of various types occur frequently, some individuals experience chronic headache and vertigo; urinary urgency or incontinence may be present.
Dystonia 26, myoclonic
MedGen UID:
904244
Concept ID:
C4225341
Disease or Syndrome
Myoclonic dystonia-26 is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by onset of myoclonic jerks affecting the upper limbs in the first or second decade of life. The disorder is progressive, and patients later develop dystonia with predominant involvement of the craniocervical regions and sometimes the trunk and/or lower limbs. Dystonia dominates the clinical picture (summary by Mencacci et al., 2015).
Alzheimer disease, type 9
MedGen UID:
924255
Concept ID:
C4282179
Finding
Mitochondrial myopathy-cerebellar ataxia-pigmentary retinopathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
1620960
Concept ID:
C4540096
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic neurological disorder characterized by motor developmental delay (in infancy), growth impairment and muscle weakness associated with myopathic abnormalities on muscle biopsy and EMG, as well as tremor, dysmetry, adiadochokinesia and walking disturbances associated with global or partial cerebral atrophy on brain MRI (particularly cerebellar vermis and hemispheres), with or without mild intellectual disability. Some patients also show pigmentary retinopathy.
Idiopathic basal ganglia calcification 1
MedGen UID:
1637664
Concept ID:
C4551624
Disease or Syndrome
Primary familial brain calcification (PFBC) is a neurodegenerative disorder with characteristic calcium deposits in the basal ganglia and other brain areas visualized on neuroimaging. Most affected individuals are in good health during childhood and young adulthood and typically present in the fourth to fifth decade with a gradually progressive movement disorder and neuropsychiatric symptoms. The movement disorder first manifests as clumsiness, fatigability, unsteady gait, slow or slurred speech, dysphagia, involuntary movements, or muscle cramping. Neuropsychiatric symptoms, often the first or most prominent manifestations, range from mild difficulty with concentration and memory to changes in personality and/or behavior, to psychosis and dementia. Seizures of various types occur frequently, some individuals experience chronic headache and vertigo; urinary urgency or incontinence may be present.
Parkinsonism-dystonia, infantile, 2
MedGen UID:
1648382
Concept ID:
C4747991
Disease or Syndrome
PKDYS2 is an autosomal recessive complex infantile-onset neurologic disorder characterized by abnormal movements, including parkinsonism, dystonia, and poor fine motor skills, as well as autonomic dysfunction, including abnormal sweating, cold extremities, and poor sleep. Some patients have variable degrees of developmental delay. Features of the disorder are consistent with decreased levels of monoamine neurotransmitters, although levels of these in the spinal fluid are normal. Preliminary findings indicate that treatment with a dopamine receptor agonist results in dramatic and sustained clinical improvement (summary by Rilstone et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PKDYS, see 613135.
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 27
MedGen UID:
1672866
Concept ID:
C5193058
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-27 (SCAR27) is an adult-onset neurologic disorder characterized by gait difficulties and other cerebellar signs, such as eye movement abnormalities, dysarthria, and difficulty writing. The disorder is progressive, and some patients may lose independent ambulation. Additional features include spasticity of the lower limbs and cognitive impairment. Brain imaging shows cerebellar atrophy (summary by Eidhof et al., 2018).
Congenital heart defects, multiple types, 7
MedGen UID:
1714491
Concept ID:
C5394062
Congenital Abnormality
Multiple types of congenital heart defects-7 (CHTD7) is an autosomal dominant disorder with incomplete penetrance characterized mainly by tetralogy of Fallot but also including right-sided aortic arch, absent pulmonary valve, and other cardiac abnormalities (Jin et al., 2017, Reuter et al., 2019).
Beck-Fahrner syndrome
MedGen UID:
1711894
Concept ID:
C5394097
Disease or Syndrome
Beck-Fahrner syndrome (BEFAHRS) is a developmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development. Affected individuals often have behavioral abnormalities, such as autistic features or attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as well as learning disabilities. Most patients have hypotonia and dysmorphic facies. Some may have growth abnormalities, including overgrowth or poor growth, poor feeding, and rarely, seizures. Although both monoallelic and biallelic mutations have been reported, some heterozygous carriers in autosomal recessive families may have milder symptoms; thus, both groups are included in this entry (summary by Beck et al., 2020).
Lissencephaly 10
MedGen UID:
1719546
Concept ID:
C5394354
Disease or Syndrome
Lissencephaly-10 (LIS10) is a neurologic disorder characterized by variably delayed development with mildly to moderately impaired intellectual development and language delay, as well as seizures, which are often intractable. There is a spectrum of severity, with some patients having normal early development and only borderline to mild cognitive impairment. Brain imaging shows features consistent with neuronal migration defects, including posterior-predominant lissencephaly, pachygyria, agyria, and subcortical band heterotopia (summary by Tsai et al., 2020). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lissencephaly, see LIS1 (607432).
Microcephaly, developmental delay, and brittle hair syndrome
MedGen UID:
1718781
Concept ID:
C5394425
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly, developmental delay, and brittle hair syndrome (MDBH) is a multisystem disorder with clinical variability. Affected individuals show cognitive and motor disabilities, as well as some degree of fine, brittle hair with microscopic shaft abnormalities. Other shared features include failure to thrive in early childhood and short stature, with some patients exhibiting feeding difficulties and hepatic steatosis (Kuo et al., 2019).

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Hobzova M, Hubackova L, Vanek J, Genzor S, Ociskova M, Grambal A, Prasko J
Neuro Endocrinol Lett 2017 Jul;38(3):145-153. PMID: 28759181
Glöckner-Rist A, Pedersen A, Rist F
J Atten Disord 2013 Feb;17(2):114-27. Epub 2011 Nov 18 doi: 10.1177/1087054711427397. PMID: 22100690
Viteva EI, Zahariev ZI
Folia Med (Plovdiv) 2009 Jan-Mar;51(1):42-9. PMID: 19437897
Kolchakova PY, Akabaliev VH
Folia Med (Plovdiv) 2003;45(4):11-5. PMID: 15272809
Kirkcaldy B, Siefen G, Furnham A
Eur Psychiatry 2003 Mar;18(2):50-8. doi: 10.1016/s0924-9338(03)00010-5. PMID: 12711399

Diagnosis

Kawe TNJ, Shadli SM, McNaughton N
Sci Rep 2019 Dec 23;9(1):19666. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-56229-w. PMID: 31873184Free PMC Article
Glöckner-Rist A, Pedersen A, Rist F
J Atten Disord 2013 Feb;17(2):114-27. Epub 2011 Nov 18 doi: 10.1177/1087054711427397. PMID: 22100690
Viteva EI, Zahariev ZI
Folia Med (Plovdiv) 2009 Jan-Mar;51(1):42-9. PMID: 19437897
Kolchakova PY, Akabaliev VH
Folia Med (Plovdiv) 2003;45(4):11-5. PMID: 15272809
Kirkcaldy B, Siefen G, Furnham A
Eur Psychiatry 2003 Mar;18(2):50-8. doi: 10.1016/s0924-9338(03)00010-5. PMID: 12711399

Therapy

Basedow LA, Kuitunen-Paul S, Wiedmann MF, Ehrlich S, Roessner V, Golub Y
BMC Psychiatry 2021 Mar 25;21(1):166. doi: 10.1186/s12888-021-03169-3. PMID: 33765981Free PMC Article
Şen S, Orhan G, Sertel S, Schmitter M, Schindler HJ, Lux CJ, Giannakopoulos NN
J Oral Rehabil 2020 Jul;47(7):783-795. Epub 2020 Mar 9 doi: 10.1111/joor.12952. PMID: 32077514
Kreuzer PM, Poeppl TB, Rupprecht R, Vielsmeier V, Lehner A, Langguth B, Schecklmann M
Sci Rep 2019 Aug 22;9(1):12274. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-48686-0. PMID: 31439873Free PMC Article
Kühn S, Kugler DT, Schmalen K, Weichenberger M, Witt C, Gallinat J
Mol Psychiatry 2019 Aug;24(8):1220-1234. Epub 2018 Mar 13 doi: 10.1038/s41380-018-0031-7. PMID: 29535447Free PMC Article
Kolchakova PY, Akabaliev VH
Folia Med (Plovdiv) 2003;45(4):11-5. PMID: 15272809

Prognosis

Cvetković J, Ivanović Kovačevic S, Cvetkovic M, Cvetkovic S
Brain Behav 2020 Apr;10(4):e01570. Epub 2020 Feb 26 doi: 10.1002/brb3.1570. PMID: 32101382Free PMC Article
Kawe TNJ, Shadli SM, McNaughton N
Sci Rep 2019 Dec 23;9(1):19666. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-56229-w. PMID: 31873184Free PMC Article
Goldstein BL, Kotov R, Perlman G, Watson D, Klein DN
Psychol Med 2018 Jun;48(8):1282-1290. Epub 2017 Sep 20 doi: 10.1017/S0033291717002719. PMID: 28929975
Wallhäusser-Franke E, Brade J, Balkenhol T, D'Amelio R, Seegmüller A, Delb W
PLoS One 2012;7(4):e34583. Epub 2012 Apr 18 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0034583. PMID: 22529921Free PMC Article
Kirkcaldy B, Siefen G, Furnham A
Eur Psychiatry 2003 Mar;18(2):50-8. doi: 10.1016/s0924-9338(03)00010-5. PMID: 12711399

Clinical prediction guides

Cvetković J, Ivanović Kovačevic S, Cvetkovic M, Cvetkovic S
Brain Behav 2020 Apr;10(4):e01570. Epub 2020 Feb 26 doi: 10.1002/brb3.1570. PMID: 32101382Free PMC Article
Kawe TNJ, Shadli SM, McNaughton N
Sci Rep 2019 Dec 23;9(1):19666. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-56229-w. PMID: 31873184Free PMC Article
Gana K, Bailly N, Broc G, Cazauvieilh C, Boudouda NE
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry 2017 Oct;32(10):1150-1157. Epub 2016 Sep 15 doi: 10.1002/gps.4582. PMID: 27633329
Wallhäusser-Franke E, Brade J, Balkenhol T, D'Amelio R, Seegmüller A, Delb W
PLoS One 2012;7(4):e34583. Epub 2012 Apr 18 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0034583. PMID: 22529921Free PMC Article
Kirkcaldy B, Siefen G, Furnham A
Eur Psychiatry 2003 Mar;18(2):50-8. doi: 10.1016/s0924-9338(03)00010-5. PMID: 12711399

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