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anemia

MedGen UID:
1526
Concept ID:
C0002871
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Anaemia; Anemia; Decreased hemoglobin
SNOMED CT: Anemia (271737000)
 
HPO: HP:0001903

Definition

A reduction in erythrocytes volume or hemoglobin concentration. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVanemia

Conditions with this feature

fabry disease
MedGen UID:
8083
Concept ID:
C0002986
Disease or Syndrome
Fabry disease results from deficient activity of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (a-Gal A) and progressive lysosomal deposition of globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) in cells throughout the body. The classic form, occurring in males with less than 1% a-Gal A enzyme activity, usually has its onset in childhood or adolescence with periodic crises of severe pain in the extremities (acroparesthesia), the appearance of vascular cutaneous lesions (angiokeratomas), sweating abnormalities (anhidrosis, hypohidrosis, and rarely hyperhidrosis), characteristic corneal and lenticular opacities, and proteinuria. Gradual deterioration of renal function to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) usually occurs in men in the third to fifth decade. In middle age, most males successfully treated for ESRD develop cardiac and/or cerebrovascular disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Heterozygous females typically have milder symptoms at a later age of onset than males. Rarely, they may be relatively asymptomatic throughout a normal life span or may have symptoms as severe as those observed in males with the classic phenotype. In contrast, males with greater than 1% a-Gal A activity may have: (1) a cardiac variant phenotype that usually presents in the sixth to eighth decade with left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyopathy and arrhythmia, and proteinuria, but without ESRD; or (2) a renal variant phenotype, associated with ESRD but without the skin lesions or pain; or (3) cerebrovascular disease presenting as stroke or transient ischemic attack.
chédiak-higashi syndrome
MedGen UID:
3347
Concept ID:
C0007965
Disease or Syndrome
Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is characterized by partial oculocutaneous albinism, immunodeficiency, and a mild bleeding tendency. Approximately 85% of affected individuals develop the accelerated phase, or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, a life-threatening, hyperinflammatory condition. All affected individuals including adolescents and adults with atypical CHS and children with classic CHS who have successfully undergone allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) develop neurologic findings during early adulthood.
diaphyseal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
4268
Concept ID:
C0011989
Finding
Camurati-Engelmann disease (CED) is characterized by hyperostosis of the long bones and the skull, proximal muscle weakness, limb pain, a wide-based, waddling gait, and joint contractures. Facial features such as macrocephaly, frontal bossing, enlargement of the mandible, proptosis, and cranial nerve impingement resulting in facial palsy are seen in severely affected individuals later in life.
letterer-siwe disease
MedGen UID:
7311
Concept ID:
C0023381
Disease or Syndrome
A multifocal, multisystem form of Langerhans-cell histiocytosis. There is involvement of multiple organ systems including the bones, skin, liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Patients are usually infants presenting with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, bone and skin lesions, and pancytopenia.
neuroblastoma
MedGen UID:
18012
Concept ID:
C0027819
Neoplastic Process
ALK-related neuroblastic tumor susceptibility is characterized by increased risk for neuroblastic tumors including neuroblastoma, ganglioneuroblastoma, and ganglioneuroma. Neuroblastoma is a more malignant tumor and ganglioneuroma a more benign tumor. Depending on the histologic findings, ganglioneuroblastoma can behave in a more aggressive fashion, like neuroblastoma, or in a benign fashion, like ganglioneuroma. Preliminary data from the ten reported families with ALK-related neuroblastic tumor susceptibility suggest an overall penetrance of approximately 57% with the risk for neuroblastic tumor development highest in infancy and decreasing by late childhood.
reticuloendotheliosis, x-linked
MedGen UID:
19757
Concept ID:
C0035288
Neoplastic Process
A greater than normal number of blood cells in the reticuloendothelial system.
recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa
MedGen UID:
36311
Concept ID:
C0079474
Disease or Syndrome
Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is a genetic skin disorder affecting skin and nails that usually presents at birth. DEB is divided into two major types depending on inheritance pattern: recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) and dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DDEB). Each type is further divided into multiple clinical subtypes. Absence of a known family history of DEB does not preclude the diagnosis. Clinical findings in severe generalized RDEB include skin fragility manifest by blistering with minimal trauma that heals with milia and scarring. Blistering and erosions affecting the whole body may be present in the neonatal period. Oral involvement may lead to mouth blistering, fusion of the tongue to the floor of the mouth, and progressive diminution of the size of the oral cavity. Esophageal erosions can lead to webs and strictures that can cause severe dysphagia. Consequently, malnutrition and vitamin and mineral deficiency may lead to growth restriction in young children. Corneal erosions can lead to scarring and loss of vision. Blistering of the hands and feet followed by scarring fuses the digits into "mitten" hands and feet, with contractures and pseudosyndactyly. The lifetime risk of aggressive squamous cell carcinoma is higher than 90%. In contrast, the blistering in the less severe forms of RDEB may be localized to hands, feet, knees, and elbows with or without involvement of flexural areas and the trunk, and without the mutilating scarring seen in severe generalized RDEB. In DDEB, blistering is often mild and limited to hands, feet, knees, and elbows, but nonetheless heals with scarring. Dystrophic nails, especially toenails, are common and may be the only manifestation of DDEB.
acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis
MedGen UID:
43097
Concept ID:
C0085077
Disease or Syndrome
Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (AFND) is an autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder characterized by onset of recurrent fever and dermatologic abnormalities in childhood. Laboratory studies show elevated acute-phase reactants and activation of the inflammatory response, particularly IL1B (147720). Additional more variable features may include myalgia and arthralgia (summary by Masters et al., 2016).
stiff-man syndrome
MedGen UID:
39017
Concept ID:
C0085292
Disease or Syndrome
The stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is most often an adult-onset sporadic acquired disorder characterized by progressive muscle stiffness with superimposed painful muscle spasms accompanied by electromyographic evidence of continuous motor activity at rest. SPS has been associated with autoimmune disorders, diabetes mellitus, thyrotoxicosis, and hypopituitarism with adrenal insufficiency (George et al., 1984). Approximately 60% of patients with SPS have antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD2, or GAD65; 138275), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting an immune-mediated pathogenesis (Folli et al., 1993). Approximately 10% of patients develop SPS as a paraneoplastic neurologic disorder associated with antibodies to amphiphysin (AMPH; 600418), an intracellular protein associated with neuronal synaptic vesicle endocytosis (Burns, 2005). See also congenital stiff-man syndrome, or hereditary hyperexplexia (149400), which is caused by mutations in subunits of the glycine receptor gene (GLRA1, 138491; GLRB, 138492). Meinck and Thompson (2002) provided a detailed review of stiff-person syndrome. They also discussed 2 possibly related conditions, progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity (PERM), a more severe disorder with other neurologic features, and stiff-limb or stiff-leg syndrome, a focal disorder.
radial aplasia-thrombocytopenia syndrome
MedGen UID:
61235
Concept ID:
C0175703
Disease or Syndrome
Thrombocytopenia absent radius (TAR) syndrome is characterized by bilateral absence of the radii with the presence of both thumbs and thrombocytopenia (<50 platelets/nL) that is generally transient. Thrombocytopenia may be congenital or may develop within the first few weeks to months of life; in general, thrombocytopenic episodes decrease with age. Cow's milk allergy is common and can be associated with exacerbation of thrombocytopenia. Other anomalies of the skeleton (upper and lower limbs, ribs, and vertebrae), heart, and genitourinary system (renal anomalies and agenesis of uterus, cervix, and upper part of the vagina) can occur.
transient erythroblastopenia of childhood
MedGen UID:
68670
Concept ID:
C0238478
Disease or Syndrome
Transient erythroblastopenia of childhood is a pure red cell aplasia that occurs in a previously healthy child, most commonly between 6 months and 4 years of age. The course is characterized by a complete recovery, usually within 1 to 2 months after diagnosis. In most cases no therapy is necessary, although some children may need red cell transfusion (summary by Gustavsson et al., 2002).
gaucher disease type ii
MedGen UID:
78652
Concept ID:
C0268250
Disease or Syndrome
Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity.
ehlers-danlos syndrome, type 4
MedGen UID:
82790
Concept ID:
C0268338
Disease or Syndrome
Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is characterized by arterial, intestinal, and/or uterine fragility; thin, translucent skin; easy bruising; characteristic facial appearance (thin vermilion of the lips, micrognathia, narrow nose, prominent eyes); and an aged appearance to the extremities, particularly the hands. Vascular dissection or rupture, gastrointestinal perforation, or organ rupture are the presenting signs in most adults with vEDS. Arterial rupture may be preceded by aneurysm, arteriovenous fistulae, or dissection but also may occur spontaneously. The majority (60%) of individuals with vEDS who are diagnosed before age 18 years are identified because of a positive family history. Neonates may present with clubfoot, hip dislocation, limb deficiency, and/or amniotic bands. Approximately half of children tested for vEDS in the absence of a positive family history present with a major complication at an average age of 11 years. Four minor diagnostic features – distal joint hypermobility, easy bruising, thin skin, and clubfeet – are most often present in those children ascertained without a major complication.
infantile hypophosphatasia
MedGen UID:
75677
Concept ID:
C0268412
Disease or Syndrome
Hypophosphatasia is characterized by defective mineralization of bone and/or teeth in the presence of low activity of serum and bone alkaline phosphatase. Clinical features range from stillbirth without mineralized bone at the severe end to pathologic fractures of the lower extremities in later adulthood at the mild end. Although the disease spectrum is a continuum, six clinical forms are usually recognized based on age at diagnosis and severity of features: Perinatal (severe) hypophosphatasia characterized by respiratory insufficiency and hypercalcemia. Perinatal (benign) hypophosphatasia with prenatal skeletal manifestations that slowly resolve into one of the milder forms. Infantile hypophosphatasia with onset between birth and age six months of rickets without elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity. Childhood (juvenile) hypophosphatasia that ranges from low bone mineral density for age with unexplained fractures to rickets, and premature loss of primary teeth with intact roots. Adult hypophosphatasia characterized by stress fractures and pseudofractures of the lower extremities in middle age, sometimes associated with early loss of adult dentition. Odontohypophosphatasia characterized by premature exfoliation of primary teeth and/or severe dental caries without skeletal manifestations.
prolidase deficiency
MedGen UID:
120647
Concept ID:
C0268532
Disease or Syndrome
Prolidase deficiency is characterized by skin lesions (typically severe, chronic, recalcitrant, and painful skin ulcers of the lower extremities and telangiectasias of the face and hands), recurrent infections (particularly of the skin and respiratory tract), dysmorphic facial features, variable intellectual disability, and hepatomegaly with elevated liver enzymes and splenomegaly. Anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypergammaglobulinemia, and hypocomplementemia are common. An association between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and prolidase deficiency has been described.
hyperlysinemia
MedGen UID:
82816
Concept ID:
C0268553
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperlysinemia type I is an autosomal recessive metabolic condition with variable clinical features. Some patients who present in infancy with nonspecific seizures, hypotonia, or mildly delayed psychomotor development have been found to have increased serum lysine and pipecolic acid on laboratory analysis. However, about 50% of probands are reported to be asymptomatic, and hyperlysinemia is generally considered to be a benign metabolic variant (summary by Tondo et al., 2013; Houten et al., 2013). The AASS gene encodes a bifunctional enzyme: lysine alpha-ketoglutarate reductase and saccharopine dehydrogenase. In hyperlysinemia type I, both enzymatic functions of AASS are defective; in hyperlysinemia type II, also known as saccharopinuria (268700), some of the first enzymatic function is retained (Cox, 1985; Cox et al., 1986).
propionic acidemia
MedGen UID:
75694
Concept ID:
C0268579
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of propionic acidemia (PA) ranges from neonatal-onset to late-onset disease. Neonatal-onset PA, the most common form, is characterized by a healthy newborn with poor feeding and decreased arousal in the first few days of life, followed by progressive encephalopathy of unexplained origin. Without prompt diagnosis and management, this is followed by progressive encephalopathy manifesting as lethargy, seizures, or coma that can result in death. It is frequently accompanied by metabolic acidosis with anion gap, lactic acidosis, ketonuria, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and cytopenias. Individuals with late-onset PA may remain asymptomatic and suffer a metabolic crisis under catabolic stress (e.g., illness, surgery, fasting) or may experience a more insidious onset with the development of multiorgan complications including vomiting, protein intolerance, failure to thrive, hypotonia, developmental delays or regression, movement disorders, or cardiomyopathy. Isolated cardiomyopathy can be observed on rare occasion in the absence of clinical metabolic decompensation or neurocognitive deficits. Manifestations of neonatal and late-onset PA over time can include growth impairment, intellectual disability, seizures, basal ganglia lesions, pancreatitis, and cardiomyopathy. Other rarely reported complications include optic atrophy, hearing loss, premature ovarian insufficiency, and chronic renal failure.
deficiency of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coa lyase
MedGen UID:
78692
Concept ID:
C0268601
Disease or Syndrome
3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with the cardinal manifestations of metabolic acidosis without ketonuria, hypoglycemia, and a characteristic pattern of elevated urinary organic acid metabolites, including 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric, 3-methylglutaric, and 3-hydroxyisovaleric acids. Urinary levels of 3-methylcrotonylglycine may be increased. Dicarboxylic aciduria, hepatomegaly, and hyperammonemia may also be observed. Presenting clinical signs include irritability, lethargy, coma, and vomiting (summary by Gibson et al., 1988).
lysinuric protein intolerance
MedGen UID:
75704
Concept ID:
C0268647
Disease or Syndrome
Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) typically presents after an infant is weaned from breast milk or formula; variable findings include recurrent vomiting and episodes of diarrhea, episodes of stupor and coma after a protein-rich meal, poor feeding, aversion to protein-rich food, failure to thrive, hepatosplenomegaly, and muscular hypotonia. Over time, findings include: poor growth, osteoporosis, involvement of the lungs (progressive interstitial changes, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis) and of the kidneys (progressive glomerular and proximal tubular disease), hematologic abnormalities (normochromic or hypochromic anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, erythroblastophagocytosis in the bone marrow aspirate), and a clinical presentation resembling the hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis/macrophagic activation syndrome. Hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and acute pancreatitis can also be seen.
delta thalassemia
MedGen UID:
78791
Concept ID:
C0271990
Disease or Syndrome
A hereditary disorder characterized by reduced or absent DELTA-GLOBIN thus effecting the level of HEMOGLOBIN A2, a minor component of adult hemoglobin monitored in the diagnosis of BETA-THALASSEMIA.
delta-0-thalassemia
MedGen UID:
543712
Concept ID:
C0271991
Disease or Syndrome
familial eosinophilia
MedGen UID:
78796
Concept ID:
C0272192
Disease or Syndrome
Familial eosinophilia is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by peripheral hypereosinophilia (greater than 500 eosinophils/micro liter of blood) with or without other oragn involvement (summary by Rioux et al., 1998).
cronkhite-canada syndrome
MedGen UID:
129128
Concept ID:
C0282207
Disease or Syndrome
Cronkhite-Canada syndrome is characterized by gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyposis, alopecia, onychodystrophy, skin hyperpigmentation, and diarrhea. It is associated with high morbidity (summary by Sweetser et al., 2012).
insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus secretory diarrhea syndrome
MedGen UID:
83339
Concept ID:
C0342288
Disease or Syndrome
IPEX (immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked) syndrome is characterized by systemic autoimmunity, typically beginning in the first year of life. Presentation is most commonly the clinical triad of watery diarrhea, endocrinopathy (most commonly insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus), and eczematous dermatitis. Most children have other autoimmune phenomena including cytopenias, autoimmune hepatitis, or nephropathy; lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, alopecia, arthritis, and lung disease related to immune dysregulation have all been observed. Fetal presentation of IPEX includes hydrops, echogenic bowel, skin desquamation, IUGR, and fetal akinesia. Without aggressive immunosuppression or bone marrow transplantation, the majority of affected males die within the first one to two years of life from metabolic derangements, severe malabsorption, or sepsis; a few with a milder phenotype have survived into the second or third decade of life.
trimethylaminuria
MedGen UID:
83350
Concept ID:
C0342739
Disease or Syndrome
Primary trimethylaminuria is characterized by a fishy odor resembling that of rotten or decaying fish that results from excess excretion of trimethylamine in the urine, breath, sweat, and reproductive fluids. No physical symptoms are associated with trimethylaminuria. Affected individuals appear normal and healthy; however, the unpleasant odor often results in social and psychological problems. Symptoms are usually present from birth and may worsen during puberty. In females, symptoms are more severe just before and during menstruation, after taking oral contraceptives, and around the time of menopause.
osteopetrosis with renal tubular acidosis
MedGen UID:
91042
Concept ID:
C0345407
Disease or Syndrome
Osteopetrosis is a bone disease that makes bones abnormally dense and prone to breakage (fracture). Researchers have described several major types of osteopetrosis, which are usually distinguished by their pattern of inheritance: autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked. The different types of the disorder can also be distinguished by the severity of their signs and symptoms.\n\nAutosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO), which is also called Albers-Schönberg disease, is typically the mildest type of the disorder. Some affected individuals have no symptoms. In these people, the unusually dense bones may be discovered by accident when an x-ray is done for another reason. In affected individuals who develop signs and symptoms, the major features of the condition include multiple bone fractures, abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis) or other spinal abnormalities, arthritis in the hips, and a bone infection called osteomyelitis. These problems usually become apparent in late childhood or adolescence.\n\nAutosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO) is a more severe form of the disorder that becomes apparent in early infancy. Affected individuals have a high risk of bone fracture resulting from seemingly minor bumps and falls. Their abnormally dense skull bones pinch nerves in the head and face (cranial nerves), often resulting in vision loss, hearing loss, and paralysis of facial muscles. Dense bones can also impair the function of bone marrow, preventing it from producing new blood cells and immune system cells. As a result, people with severe osteopetrosis are at risk of abnormal bleeding, a shortage of red blood cells (anemia), and recurrent infections. In the most severe cases, these bone marrow abnormalities can be life-threatening in infancy or early childhood.\n\nOther features of autosomal recessive osteopetrosis can include slow growth and short stature, dental abnormalities, and an enlarged liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly). Depending on the genetic changes involved, people with severe osteopetrosis can also have brain abnormalities, intellectual disability, or recurrent seizures (epilepsy).\n\nA few individuals have been diagnosed with intermediate autosomal osteopetrosis (IAO), a form of the disorder that can have either an autosomal dominant or an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The signs and symptoms of this condition become noticeable in childhood and include an increased risk of bone fracture and anemia. People with this form of the disorder typically do not have life-threatening bone marrow abnormalities. However, some affected individuals have had abnormal calcium deposits (calcifications) in the brain, intellectual disability, and a form of kidney disease called renal tubular acidosis.\n\nRarely, osteopetrosis can have an X-linked pattern of inheritance. In addition to abnormally dense bones, the X-linked form of the disorder is characterized by abnormal swelling caused by a buildup of fluid (lymphedema) and a condition called anhydrotic ectodermal dysplasia that affects the skin, hair, teeth, and sweat glands. Affected individuals also have a malfunctioning immune system (immunodeficiency), which allows severe, recurrent infections to develop. Researchers often refer to this condition as OL-EDA-ID, an acronym derived from each of the major features of the disorder.
anti-glomerular basement membrane disease
MedGen UID:
140788
Concept ID:
C0403529
Disease or Syndrome
A rapidly progressive and generally fulminant rare autoimmune condition characterized by the presence of anti-GBM antibodies, affecting glomerular and/or pulmonary capillaries. It may manifest as an isolated glomerulonephritis (anti-GBM nephritis) or as a pulmonary-renal syndrome with severe lung hemorrhage (Goodpasture's syndrome).
chronic infantile neurological, cutaneous and articular syndrome
MedGen UID:
98370
Concept ID:
C0409818
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome is a severe chronic inflammatory disease of early onset, characterized by cutaneous symptoms, central nervous system involvement, and arthropathy (Feldmann et al., 2002). See also familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome-1 (FCAS1, CAPS1; 120100), an allelic disorder with a less severe phenotype.
non-immune hydrops fetalis
MedGen UID:
105327
Concept ID:
C0455988
Disease or Syndrome
Hydrops fetalis is a descriptive term for generalized edema of the fetus, with fluid accumulation in extravascular components and body cavities. It is not a diagnosis in itself, but a symptom and end-stage result of a wide variety of disorders. In the case of immune hydrops fetalis, a frequent cause is maternofetal incompatibility as in that related to a number of genetic anemias and metabolic disorders expressed in the fetus; in other instances, it remains idiopathic and likely multifactorial (summary by Bellini et al., 2009). Nonimmune hydrops fetalis accounts for 76 to 87% of all described cases of hydrops fetalis (Bellini et al., 2009). Genetic Heterogeneity of Hydrops Fetalis In southeast Asia, alpha-thalassemia is the most common cause of hydrops fetalis, accounting for 60 to 90% of cases. Almost all of these cases result from homozygous deletion of the HBA1 (141800) and HBA2 (141850) genes. A few cases have been reported that had 1 apparently normal alpha-globin gene, termed the hemoglobin H (613978) hydrops fetalis syndrome (summary by Chui and Waye, 1998). Other genetic disorders predisposing to NIHF include other congenital anemias, such as erythropoietic porphyria (e.g., 606938.0013), and many metabolic disorders, such as one form of Gaucher disease (e.g., 606463.0009), infantile sialic acid storage disease (269920), mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (253220), glycogen storage disease IV (232500), congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia (212065), and disorders of lymphatic malformation (see, e.g., LMPHM1, 153100).
subcutaneous panniculitis-like t-cell lymphoma
MedGen UID:
99306
Concept ID:
C0522624
Neoplastic Process
Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma (SPTCL) is an uncommon form of T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma in which cytotoxic CD8 (see 186910)+ T cells infiltrate adipose tissue forming subcutaneous nodules. Both children and adults can be affected, with a median age at diagnosis of 36 years and a female gender bias. Most patients have accompanying systemic features such as fever or flank pain. A subset (about 20%) of patients develop hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), usually associated with CD8+ T cells rimming adipocytes in the bone marrow. An infectious agent is not identified, and the disorder is believed to result from improperly activated inflammation. Immunosuppressive therapy may be helpful; hematopoietic bone marrow transplantation is usually curative (summary by Gayden et al., 2018). For a general discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLH, see HLH1 (267700).
schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia
MedGen UID:
164078
Concept ID:
C0877024
Congenital Abnormality
Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia (SIOD) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) resulting in short stature, nephropathy, and T-cell deficiency. Radiographic manifestations of SED include ovoid and mildly flattened vertebral bodies, small deformed capital femoral epiphyses, and shallow dysplastic acetabular fossae. Adult height is 136-157 cm for men and 98.5-143 cm for women. Nearly all affected individuals have progressive steroid-resistant nephropathy, usually developing within five years of the diagnosis of growth failure and terminating with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The majority of tested individuals have T-cell deficiency and an associated risk for opportunistic infection, a common cause of death. SIOD involves a spectrum that ranges from an infantile or severe early-onset form with death early in life to a juvenile or milder later-onset form with survival into adulthood if renal disease is appropriately treated.
deficiency of ferroxidase
MedGen UID:
168057
Concept ID:
C0878682
Disease or Syndrome
Aceruloplasminemia is characterized by iron accumulation in the brain and viscera. The clinical triad of retinal degeneration, diabetes mellitus (DM), and neurologic disease is seen in individuals ranging from age 30 years to older than 70 years. The neurologic findings of movement disorder (blepharospasm, grimacing, facial and neck dystonia, tremors, chorea) and ataxia (gait ataxia, dysarthria) correspond to regions of iron deposition in the brain. Individuals with aceruloplasminemia often present with anemia prior to onset of DM or obvious neurologic problems. Cognitive dysfunction including apathy and forgetfulness occurs in more than half of individuals with this condition.
dyskeratosis congenita, x-linked
MedGen UID:
216941
Concept ID:
C1148551
Disease or Syndrome
Dyskeratosis congenita (DC), a telomere biology disorder, is characterized by a classic triad of dysplastic nails, lacy reticular pigmentation of the upper chest and/or neck, and oral leukoplakia. The classic triad may not be present in all individuals. People with DC are at increased risk for progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), solid tumors (usually squamous cell carcinoma of the head/neck or anogenital cancer), and pulmonary fibrosis. Other findings can include: abnormal pigmentation changes not restricted to the upper chest and neck, eye abnormalities (epiphora, blepharitis, sparse eyelashes, ectropion, entropion, trichiasis), and dental abnormalities (caries, periodontal disease, taurodauntism). Although most persons with DC have normal psychomotor development and normal neurologic function, significant developmental delay is present in the two variants in which additional findings include cerebellar hypoplasia (Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome) and bilateral exudative retinopathy and intracranial calcifications (Revesz syndrome). Onset and progression of manifestations of DC vary: at the mild end of the spectrum are those who have only minimal physical findings with normal bone marrow function, and at the severe end are those who have the diagnostic triad and early-onset BMF.
deficiency of transaldolase
MedGen UID:
224855
Concept ID:
C1291329
Disease or Syndrome
Transaldolase deficiency (TALDOD) is a rare inborn error of pentose metabolism. Typical features include intrauterine growth restriction, triangular face, loose wrinkly skin at birth, and development of progressive liver failure (summary by Lee-Barber et al., 2019).
ataxia-pancytopenia syndrome
MedGen UID:
230896
Concept ID:
C1327919
Disease or Syndrome
SAMD9L ataxia-pancytopenia (ATXPC) syndrome is characterized by cerebellar ataxia, variable hematologic cytopenias, and predisposition to marrow failure, myelodysplasia, and myeloid leukemia, sometimes associated with monosomy 7. The onset of hematologic abnormalities has been reported as early as age three months. The cytopenias in all cell lineages range from mild to very severe. Onset of neurologic impairment is variable. Nystagmus, dysmetria, increased deep tendon reflexes, and clonus are common. Gait impairment and other neurologic abnormalities are slowly progressive.
myelodysplasia, immunodeficiency, facial dysmorphism, short stature, and psychomotor delay
MedGen UID:
318627
Concept ID:
C1832442
Disease or Syndrome
neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism
MedGen UID:
331326
Concept ID:
C1832615
Disease or Syndrome
Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism usually manifests in the first 6 months of life with severe hypercalcemia, bone demineralization, and failure to thrive. Early diagnosis is critical because untreated NSHPT can be a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder, which in some cases is lethal without parathyroidectomy. Some infants have milder hyperparathyroidism and a substantially milder clinical presentation and natural history (summary by Egbuna and Brown, 2008).
juvenile polyposis/hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
331400
Concept ID:
C1832942
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is characterized by the presence of multiple arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) that lack intervening capillaries and result in direct connections between arteries and veins. The most common clinical manifestation is spontaneous and recurrent nosebleeds (epistaxis) beginning on average at age 12 years. Telangiectases (small AVMs) are most evident on the lips, tongue, buccal mucosa, face, chest, and fingers. The average age of onset is generally later than epistaxis, but may be during childhood. Large AVMs often cause symptoms when they occur in the lungs, liver, or brain; complications from bleeding or shunting may be sudden and catastrophic. Approximately 25% of individuals with HHT have GI bleeding, which most commonly begins after age 50 years.
oslam syndrome
MedGen UID:
331588
Concept ID:
C1833792
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome characterized by the association of osteosarcoma, limb anomalies (clinodactyly with brachymesophalangia, bilateral radioulnar synostosis and absence of one digital ray of the foot) and red cell macrocytosis without anemia. It has been described in three out of nine children from one family.
diabetes mellitus, permanent neonatal, with cerebellar agenesis
MedGen UID:
332288
Concept ID:
C1836780
Disease or Syndrome
Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus-pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis syndrome is characterized by neonatal diabetes mellitus associated with cerebellar and/or pancreatic agenesis.
familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis 3
MedGen UID:
332383
Concept ID:
C1837174
Disease or Syndrome
Secretion of the contents of cytolytic granules at the immunologic synapse is a highly regulated process essential for lymphocyte cytotoxicity. This process requires the rapid transfer of perforin (170280)-containing lytic granules to the target cell interface, followed by their docking and fusion with the plasma membrane. Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by defective cytotoxicity. For a more detailed description of FHL, see 267700.
telangiectasia, hereditary hemorrhagic, type 2
MedGen UID:
324960
Concept ID:
C1838163
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is characterized by the presence of multiple arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) that lack intervening capillaries and result in direct connections between arteries and veins. The most common clinical manifestation is spontaneous and recurrent nosebleeds (epistaxis) beginning on average at age 12 years. Telangiectases (small AVMs) are most evident on the lips, tongue, buccal mucosa, face, chest, and fingers. The average age of onset is generally later than epistaxis, but may be during childhood. Large AVMs often cause symptoms when they occur in the lungs, liver, or brain; complications from bleeding or shunting may be sudden and catastrophic. Approximately 25% of individuals with HHT have GI bleeding, which most commonly begins after age 50 years.
gaucher disease, perinatal lethal
MedGen UID:
374996
Concept ID:
C1842704
Disease or Syndrome
Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity.
senior-loken syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
337697
Concept ID:
C1846979
Disease or Syndrome
Nephronophthisis causes fluid-filled cysts to develop in the kidneys beginning in childhood. These cysts impair kidney function, initially causing increased urine production (polyuria), excessive thirst (polydipsia), general weakness, and extreme tiredness (fatigue). Nephronophthisis leads to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) later in childhood or in adolescence. ESRD is a life-threatening failure of kidney function that occurs when the kidneys are no longer able to filter fluids and waste products from the body effectively.\n\nLeber congenital amaurosis primarily affects the retina, which is the specialized tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color. This condition causes vision problems, including an increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), involuntary movements of the eyes (nystagmus), and extreme farsightedness (hyperopia). Some people with Senior-Løken syndrome develop the signs of Leber congenital amaurosis within the first few years of life, while others do not develop vision problems until later in childhood.\n\nSenior-Løken syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of two specific features: a kidney condition called nephronophthisis and an eye condition known as Leber congenital amaurosis.
nephronophthisis 4
MedGen UID:
339667
Concept ID:
C1847013
Disease or Syndrome
The nephronophthisis (NPH) phenotype is characterized by reduced renal concentrating ability, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal disease, and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before age 30 years. Three age-based clinical subtypes are recognized: infantile, juvenile, and adolescent/adult. Infantile NPH can present in utero with oligohydramnios sequence (limb contractures, pulmonary hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphisms) or postnatally with renal manifestations that progress to ESRD before age 3 years. Juvenile NPH, the most prevalent subtype, typically presents with polydipsia and polyuria, growth retardation, chronic iron-resistant anemia, or other findings related to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension is typically absent due to salt wasting. ESRD develops at a median age of 13 years. Ultrasound findings are increased echogenicity, reduced corticomedullary differentiation, and renal cysts (in 50% of affected individuals). Histologic findings include tubulointerstitial fibrosis, thickened and disrupted tubular basement membrane, sporadic corticomedullary cysts, and normal or reduced kidney size. Adolescent/adult NPH is clinically similar to juvenile NPH, but ESRD develops at a median age of 19 years. Within a subtype, inter- and intrafamilial variability in rate of progression to ESRD is considerable. Approximately 80%-90% of individuals with the NPH phenotype have no extrarenal features (i.e., they have isolated NPH); ~10%-20% have extrarenal manifestations that constitute a recognizable syndrome (e.g., Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Jeune syndrome and related skeletal disorders, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, Senior-Løken syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, COACH syndrome, and oculomotor apraxia, Cogan type).
thanatophoric dysplasia, glasgow variant
MedGen UID:
376457
Concept ID:
C1848865
Disease or Syndrome
saldino-mainzer syndrome
MedGen UID:
341455
Concept ID:
C1849437
Disease or Syndrome
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of short-rib thoracic dysplasia, see SRTD1 (208500).
autosomal recessive osteopetrosis 2
MedGen UID:
342420
Concept ID:
C1850126
Disease or Syndrome
Rarely, osteopetrosis can have an X-linked pattern of inheritance. In addition to abnormally dense bones, the X-linked form of the disorder is characterized by abnormal swelling caused by a buildup of fluid (lymphedema) and a condition called anhydrotic ectodermal dysplasia that affects the skin, hair, teeth, and sweat glands. Affected individuals also have a malfunctioning immune system (immunodeficiency), which allows severe, recurrent infections to develop. Researchers often refer to this condition as OL-EDA-ID, an acronym derived from each of the major features of the disorder.\n\nA few individuals have been diagnosed with intermediate autosomal osteopetrosis (IAO), a form of the disorder that can have either an autosomal dominant or an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The signs and symptoms of this condition become noticeable in childhood and include an increased risk of bone fracture and anemia. People with this form of the disorder typically do not have life-threatening bone marrow abnormalities. However, some affected individuals have had abnormal calcium deposits (calcifications) in the brain, intellectual disability, and a form of kidney disease called renal tubular acidosis.\n\nOther features of autosomal recessive osteopetrosis can include slow growth and short stature, dental abnormalities, and an enlarged liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly). Depending on the genetic changes involved, people with severe osteopetrosis can also have brain abnormalities, intellectual disability, or recurrent seizures (epilepsy).\n\nAutosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO) is a more severe form of the disorder that becomes apparent in early infancy. Affected individuals have a high risk of bone fracture resulting from seemingly minor bumps and falls. Their abnormally dense skull bones pinch nerves in the head and face (cranial nerves), often resulting in vision loss, hearing loss, and paralysis of facial muscles. Dense bones can also impair the function of bone marrow, preventing it from producing new blood cells and immune system cells. As a result, people with severe osteopetrosis are at risk of abnormal bleeding, a shortage of red blood cells (anemia), and recurrent infections. In the most severe cases, these bone marrow abnormalities can be life-threatening in infancy or early childhood.\n\nAutosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO), which is also called Albers-Schönberg disease, is typically the mildest type of the disorder. Some affected individuals have no symptoms. In these people, the unusually dense bones may be discovered by accident when an x-ray is done for another reason. In affected individuals who develop signs and symptoms, the major features of the condition include multiple bone fractures, abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis) or other spinal abnormalities, arthritis in the hips, and a bone infection called osteomyelitis. These problems usually become apparent in late childhood or adolescence.\n\nOsteopetrosis is a bone disease that makes bones abnormally dense and prone to breakage (fracture). Researchers have described several major types of osteopetrosis, which are usually distinguished by their pattern of inheritance: autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked. The different types of the disorder can also be distinguished by the severity of their signs and symptoms.
autosomal recessive osteopetrosis 1
MedGen UID:
376708
Concept ID:
C1850127
Disease or Syndrome
Osteopetrosis (OPT) is a life-threatening disease caused by subnormal osteoclast function, with an incidence of 1 in 250,000 births. The disease usually manifests in the first few months of life with macrocephaly and frontal bossing, resulting in a characteristic facial appearance. Defective bone remodeling of the skull results in choanal stenosis with concomitant respiratory problems and feeding difficulties, which are the first clinical manifestation of disease. The expanding bone encroaches on neural foramina, leading to blindness, deafness, and facial palsy. Complete visual loss invariably occurs in all untreated patients, and hearing loss is estimated to affect 78% of patients with OPT. Tooth eruption defects and severe dental caries are common. Calcium feedback hemostasis is impaired, and children with OPT are at risk of developing hypocalcemia with attendant tetanic seizures and secondary hyperparathyroidism. The most severe complication of OPT, limiting survival, is bone marrow insufficiency. The abnormal expansion of cortical and trabecular bone physically limits the availability of medullary space for hematopoietic activity, leading to life-threatening cytopenia and secondary expansion of extramedullary hematopoiesis at sites such as the liver and spleen (summary by Aker et al., 2012). Genetic Heterogeneity of Autosomal Recessive Osteopetrosis Other forms of autosomal recessive infantile malignant osteopetrosis include OPTB4 (611490), which is caused by mutation in the CLCN7 gene (602727) on chromosome 16p13, and OPTB5 (259720), which is caused by mutation in the OSTM1 gene (607649) on chromosome 6q21. A milder, osteoclast-poor form of autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (OPTB2; 259710) is caused by mutation in the TNFSF11 gene (602642) on chromosome 13q14, an intermediate form (OPTB6; 611497) is caused by mutation in the PLEKHM1 gene (611466) on chromosome 17q21, and a severe osteoclast-poor form associated with hypogammaglobulinemia (OPTB7; 612301) is caused by mutation in the TNFRSF11A gene (603499) on chromosome 18q22. Another form of autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (OPTB8; 615085) is caused by mutation in the SNX10 gene (614780) on chromosome 7p15. A form of autosomal recessive osteopetrosis associated with renal tubular acidosis (OPTB3; 259730) is caused by mutation in the CA2 gene (611492) on chromosome 8q21. Autosomal dominant forms of osteopetrosis are more benign (see OPTA1, 607634).
familial benign copper deficiency
MedGen UID:
338958
Concept ID:
C1852576
Disease or Syndrome
A rare disorder of mineral absorption and transport characterized by hypocupremia that manifests as failure to thrive, mild anemia, repeated seizures, hypotonia and seborrheic skin. Spurring of the femur and tibia are also noted on radiographic imaging. Symptoms are reversible or improve with supplements of oral copper. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1982.
hemochromatosis type 4
MedGen UID:
340044
Concept ID:
C1853733
Disease or Syndrome
Hemochromatosis type 4 (HFE4) is a dominantly inherited iron overload disorder with heterogeneous phenotypic manifestations that can be classified into 2 groups. One group is characterized by an early rise in ferritin (see 134790) levels with low to normal transferrin (190000) saturation and iron accumulation predominantly in macrophages. The other group is similar to classical hemochromatosis, with high transferrin saturation and prominent parenchymal iron loading (summary by De Domenico et al., 2005). For general background information and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hereditary hemochromatosis, see 235200.
vitamin b12-responsive methylmalonic acidemia type cblb
MedGen UID:
344420
Concept ID:
C1855102
Disease or Syndrome
Isolated methylmalonic acidemia/aciduria, the topic of this GeneReview, is caused by complete or partial deficiency of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (mut0 enzymatic subtype or mut– enzymatic subtype, respectively), a defect in the transport or synthesis of its cofactor, adenosyl-cobalamin (cblA, cblB, or cblD-MMA), or deficiency of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase. Onset of the manifestations of isolated methylmalonic acidemia/aciduria ranges from the neonatal period to adulthood. All phenotypes are characterized by periods of relative health and intermittent metabolic decompensation, usually associated with intercurrent infections and stress. In the neonatal period the disease can present with lethargy, vomiting, hypotonia, hypothermia, respiratory distress, severe ketoacidosis, hyperammonemia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia and can result in death within the first four weeks of life. In the infantile/non-B12-responsive phenotype, infants are normal at birth, but develop lethargy, vomiting, dehydration, failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, hypotonia, and encephalopathy within a few weeks to months of age. An intermediate B12-responsive phenotype can occasionally be observed in neonates, but is usually observed in the first months or years of life; affected children exhibit anorexia, failure to thrive, hypotonia, and developmental delay, and sometimes have protein aversion and/or vomiting and lethargy after protein intake. Atypical and "benign"/adult methylmalonic acidemia phenotypes are associated with increased, albeit mild, urinary excretion of methylmalonate. Major secondary complications of methylmalonic acidemia include: intellectual impairment (variable); tubulointerstitial nephritis with progressive renal failure; "metabolic stroke" (acute and chronic basal ganglia injury) causing a disabling movement disorder with choreoathetosis, dystonia, and para/quadriparesis; pancreatitis; growth failure; functional immune impairment; and optic nerve atrophy.
vitamin b12-responsive methylmalonic acidemia type cbla
MedGen UID:
344422
Concept ID:
C1855109
Disease or Syndrome
Isolated methylmalonic acidemia/aciduria, the topic of this GeneReview, is caused by complete or partial deficiency of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (mut0 enzymatic subtype or mut– enzymatic subtype, respectively), a defect in the transport or synthesis of its cofactor, adenosyl-cobalamin (cblA, cblB, or cblD-MMA), or deficiency of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase. Onset of the manifestations of isolated methylmalonic acidemia/aciduria ranges from the neonatal period to adulthood. All phenotypes are characterized by periods of relative health and intermittent metabolic decompensation, usually associated with intercurrent infections and stress. In the neonatal period the disease can present with lethargy, vomiting, hypotonia, hypothermia, respiratory distress, severe ketoacidosis, hyperammonemia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia and can result in death within the first four weeks of life. In the infantile/non-B12-responsive phenotype, infants are normal at birth, but develop lethargy, vomiting, dehydration, failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, hypotonia, and encephalopathy within a few weeks to months of age. An intermediate B12-responsive phenotype can occasionally be observed in neonates, but is usually observed in the first months or years of life; affected children exhibit anorexia, failure to thrive, hypotonia, and developmental delay, and sometimes have protein aversion and/or vomiting and lethargy after protein intake. Atypical and "benign"/adult methylmalonic acidemia phenotypes are associated with increased, albeit mild, urinary excretion of methylmalonate. Major secondary complications of methylmalonic acidemia include: intellectual impairment (variable); tubulointerstitial nephritis with progressive renal failure; "metabolic stroke" (acute and chronic basal ganglia injury) causing a disabling movement disorder with choreoathetosis, dystonia, and para/quadriparesis; pancreatitis; growth failure; functional immune impairment; and optic nerve atrophy.
autosomal recessive kenny-caffey syndrome
MedGen UID:
340923
Concept ID:
C1855648
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, primary bone dysplasia characterized by prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, short stature, cortical thickening and medullary stenosis of the long bones, absent diploic space in the skull bones, hypocalcemia due to the hypoparathyroidism, small hands and feet, delayed mental and motor development, intellectual disability, dental anomalies, and dysmorphic features, including prominent forehead, small deep-set eyes, beaked nose, and micrognathia.
dohle bodies and leukemia
MedGen UID:
346548
Concept ID:
C1857225
Neoplastic Process
hemochromatosis type 3
MedGen UID:
388114
Concept ID:
C1858664
Disease or Syndrome
TFR2-related hereditary hemochromatosis (TFR2-HHC) is characterized by increased intestinal iron absorption resulting in iron accumulation in the liver, heart, pancreas, and endocrine organs. Age of onset is earlier than in HFE-associated HHC. The majority of individuals present with signs and symptoms of iron overload in the third decade (e.g., weakness, fatigue, abdominal pain, hepatomegaly, arthritis, arthralgia, progressive increase in skin pigmentation). Others present as young adults with nonspecific symptoms and abnormal serum iron studies or as adults with abnormal serum iron studies and signs of organ involvement including cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, and arthropathy.
arteriosclerosis, severe juvenile
MedGen UID:
395330
Concept ID:
C1859725
Disease or Syndrome
neutropenia, severe congenital 1, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
348506
Concept ID:
C1859966
Disease or Syndrome
ELANE-related neutropenia includes congenital neutropenia and cyclic neutropenia, both of which are primary hematologic disorders characterized by recurrent fever, skin and oropharyngeal inflammation (i.e., mouth ulcers, gingivitis, sinusitis, and pharyngitis), and cervical adenopathy. Infectious complications are generally more severe in congenital neutropenia than in cyclic neutropenia. In congenital neutropenia, omphalitis immediately after birth may be the first sign; in untreated children diarrhea, pneumonia, and deep abscesses in the liver, lungs, and subcutaneous tissues are common in the first year of life. After 15 years with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment, the risk of developing myelodysplasia (MDS) or acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is approximately 15%-25%. Cyclic neutropenia is usually diagnosed within the first year of life based on approximately three-week intervals of fever and oral ulcerations and regular oscillations of blood cell counts. Cellulitis, especially perianal cellulitis, is common during neutropenic periods. Between neutropenic periods, affected individuals are generally healthy. Symptoms improve in adulthood. Cyclic neutropenia is not associated with risk of malignancy or conversion to leukemia.
platelet-type bleeding disorder 16
MedGen UID:
348293
Concept ID:
C1861195
Disease or Syndrome
Platelet-type bleeding disorder-16 (BDPLT16) is an autosomal dominant form of congenital macrothrombocytopenia associated with platelet anisocytosis. It is a disorder of platelet production. Affected individuals may have no or only mildly increased bleeding tendency. In vitro studies show mild platelet functional abnormalities (summary by Kunishima et al., 2011 and Nurden et al., 2011). Genetic Heterogeneity of Glanzmann Thrombasthenia-like with Macrothromocytopenia See BDPLT24 (619271), caused by mutation in the ITGB3 gene (173470) on chromosome 17q21.32. Together the ITGB2B and ITBG3 genes form an integrin, known as platelet glycoprotein GPIIb/III, that is expressed on platelets.
stormorken syndrome
MedGen UID:
350028
Concept ID:
C1861451
Disease or Syndrome
Stormorken syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mild bleeding tendency due to platelet dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, anemia, asplenia, tubular aggregate myopathy, congenital miosis, and ichthyosis. Additional features may include headache or recurrent stroke-like episodes (summary by Misceo et al., 2014).
familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis 2
MedGen UID:
400366
Concept ID:
C1863727
Disease or Syndrome
Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis-2 (FHL2) is an autosomal recessive disorder of immune dysregulation with onset in infancy or early childhood. It is characterized clinically by fever, edema, hepatosplenomegaly, and liver dysfunction. Neurologic impairment, seizures, and ataxia are frequent. Laboratory studies show pancytopenia, coagulation abnormalities, hypofibrinogenemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. There is increased production of cytokines, such as gamma-interferon (IFNG; 147570) and TNF-alpha (191160), by hyperactivation and proliferation of T cells and macrophages. Activity of cytotoxic T cells and NK cells is reduced, consistent with a defect in cellular cytotoxicity. Bone marrow, lymph nodes, spleen, and liver show features of hemophagocytosis. Chemotherapy and/or immunosuppressant therapy may result in symptomatic remission, but the disorder is fatal without bone marrow transplantation (summary by Dufourcq-Lagelouse et al., 1999, Stepp et al., 1999, and Molleran Lee et al., 2004). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of FHL, see 267700.
familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis 4
MedGen UID:
350245
Concept ID:
C1863728
Disease or Syndrome
Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a hyperinflammatory disorder clinically diagnosed based on the fulfillment of 5 of 8 criteria, including fever, splenomegaly, bicytopenia, hypertriglyceridemia and/or hypofibrinogenemia, hemophagocytosis, low or absent natural killer (NK) cell activity, hyperferritinemia, and high soluble IL2 receptor levels (IL2R; 147730). The disorder typically presents in infancy or early childhood. Persistent remission is rarely achieved with chemo- or immunotherapy; hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only cure (summary by Muller et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL), see 267700.
gaucher disease, atypical, due to saposin c deficiency
MedGen UID:
350479
Concept ID:
C1864651
Disease or Syndrome
pyridoxal phosphate-responsive seizures
MedGen UID:
350498
Concept ID:
C1864723
Disease or Syndrome
PNPOD is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism resulting in vitamin B6 deficiency that manifests as neonatal-onset severe seizures and subsequent encephalopathy. Patients with PNPO mutations tend to respond better to treatment with pyridoxal 5-prime phosphate (PLP) than with pyridoxine (summary by Plecko et al., 2014).
hemochromatosis type 2b
MedGen UID:
356040
Concept ID:
C1865616
Disease or Syndrome
Juvenile hemochromatosis is characterized by onset of severe iron overload occurring typically in the first to third decades of life. Males and females are equally affected. Prominent clinical features include hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, cardiomyopathy, glucose intolerance and diabetes, arthropathy, and liver fibrosis or cirrhosis. Hepatocellular cancer has been reported occasionally. The main cause of death is cardiac disease. If juvenile hemochromatosis is detected early enough and if blood is removed regularly through the process of phlebotomy to achieve iron depletion, morbidity and mortality are greatly reduced.
generalized juvenile polyposis/juvenile polyposis coli
MedGen UID:
356898
Concept ID:
C1868081
Disease or Syndrome
Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is characterized by predisposition to hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, specifically in the stomach, small intestine, colon, and rectum. The term "juvenile" refers to the type of polyp rather than to the age of onset of polyps. Most individuals with JPS have some polyps by age 20 years; some may have only four or five polyps over their lifetime, whereas others in the same family may have more than 100. If the polyps are left untreated, they may cause bleeding and anemia. Most juvenile polyps are benign; however, malignant transformation can occur. Risk for GI cancers in families with JPS ranges from 9% to 50%. Most of this increased risk is attributed to colon cancer, but cancers of the stomach, upper GI tract, and pancreas have also been reported. A combined syndrome of JPS and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (JPS/HHT) is present in most individuals with an SMAD4 pathogenic variant.
medullary cystic kidney disease 1
MedGen UID:
358137
Concept ID:
C1868139
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease, MUC1-related (ADTKD-MUC1) was previously known as medullary cystic kidney disease type 1. It is characterized by slowly progressive tubulointerstitial disease that leads to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the need for dialysis or kidney transplantation. ESRD typically occurs in adulthood but is extremely variable, occurring at any age between 20 and 70 years. There are no other systemic manifestations.
pancytopenia and occlusive vascular disease
MedGen UID:
358375
Concept ID:
C1868652
Disease or Syndrome
mevalonic aciduria
MedGen UID:
368373
Concept ID:
C1959626
Disease or Syndrome
Mevalonic aciduria, the first recognized defect in the biosynthesis of cholesterol and isoprenoids, is a consequence of a deficiency of mevalonate kinase (ATP:mevalonate 5-phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.36). Mevalonic acid accumulates because of failure of conversion to 5-phosphomevalonic acid, which is catalyzed by mevalonate kinase. Mevalonic acid is synthesized from 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA, a reaction catalyzed by HMG-CoA reductase (142910). Mevalonic aciduria is characterized by dysmorphology, psychomotor retardation, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and recurrent febrile crises, usually manifesting in early infancy, accompanied by hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, arthralgia, and skin rash. The febrile crises are similar to those observed in hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and to periodic fever syndrome (HIDS; 260920), which is also caused by mutation in the MVK gene (summary by Prietsch et al., 2003).
gaucher disease type i
MedGen UID:
409531
Concept ID:
C1961835
Disease or Syndrome
Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity.
osteopetrosis, autosomal recessive 5
MedGen UID:
409627
Concept ID:
C1968603
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis-5 is a form of infantile malignant osteopetrosis, characterized by defective osteoclast function resulting in decreased bone resorption and generalized osteosclerosis. Defective resorption causes development of densely sclerotic fragile bones and progressive obliteration of the marrow spaces and cranial foramina. Marrow obliteration is associated with extramedullary hematopoiesis and hepatosplenomegaly, and results in anemia and thrombocytopenia, whereas nerve entrapment accounts for progressive blindness and hearing loss. Other major manifestations include failure to thrive, pathologic fractures, and increased infection rate. Most affected children succumb to severe bone marrow failure and overwhelming infection in the first few years of life (Quarello et al., 2004).
autosomal recessive osteopetrosis 4
MedGen UID:
370598
Concept ID:
C1969106
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of CLCN7-related osteopetrosis includes infantile malignant CLCN7-related recessive osteopetrosis (ARO), intermediate autosomal osteopetrosis (IAO), and autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II (ADOII, Albers-Schönberg disease). Onset of ARO is in infancy. Findings may include: fractures; poor growth; sclerosis of the skull base (with or without choanal stenosis or hydrocephalus) resulting in optic nerve compression, facial palsy, and hearing loss; absence of the bone marrow cavity resulting in severe anemia and thrombocytopenia; dental abnormalities, odontomas, and risk for mandibular osteomyelitis; and hypocalcemia with tetanic seizures and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Without treatment maximal life span in ARO is ten years. Onset of IAO is in childhood. Findings may include fractures after minor trauma, characteristic skeletal radiographic changes found incidentally, mild anemia, and occasional visual impairment secondary to optic nerve compression. Life expectancy in IAO is usually normal. Onset of ADOII is usually late childhood or adolescence. Findings may include: fractures (in any long bone and/or the posterior arch of a vertebra), scoliosis, hip osteoarthritis, and osteomyelitis of the mandible or septic osteitis or osteoarthritis elsewhere. Cranial nerve compression is rare.
deficiency of isobutyryl-coa dehydrogenase
MedGen UID:
370754
Concept ID:
C1969809
Disease or Syndrome
Isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IBD) deficiency is a condition that disrupts the breakdown of certain proteins. Normally, proteins from food are broken down into parts called amino acids. Amino acids can be further processed to provide energy for growth and development. People with IBD deficiency have inadequate levels of an enzyme that helps break down a particular amino acid called valine.\n\nMost people with IBD deficiency are asymptomatic, which means they do not have any signs or symptoms of the condition. A few children with IBD deficiency have developed features such as a weakened and enlarged heart (dilated cardiomyopathy), weak muscle tone (hypotonia), and developmental delay. This condition may also cause low numbers of red blood cells (anemia) and very low blood levels of carnitine, which is a natural substance that helps convert certain foods into energy. The range of signs and symptoms associated with IBD deficiency remains unclear because very few affected individuals have been reported.
exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, dyserythropoietic anemia, and calvarial hyperostosis
MedGen UID:
436369
Concept ID:
C2675184
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome is characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, dyserythropoietic anemia, and calvarial hyperostosis.
severe congenital neutropenia 4, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
436454
Concept ID:
C2675526
Disease or Syndrome
G6PC3 deficiency is characterized by severe congenital neutropenia which occurs in a phenotypic continuum that includes the following: Isolated severe congenital neutropenia (nonsyndromic). Classic G6PC3 deficiency (severe congenital neutropenia plus cardiovascular and/or urogenital abnormalities). Severe G6PC3 deficiency (classic G6PC3 deficiency plus involvement of non-myeloid hematopoietic cell lines, additional extra-hematologic features, and pulmonary hypertension; known as Dursun syndrome). Neutropenia usually presents with recurrent bacterial infections in the first few months of life. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), failure to thrive (FTT), and poor postnatal growth are common. Other findings in classic and severe G6PC3 deficiency can include inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) resembling Crohn's disease, and endocrine disorders (growth hormone deficiency, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and delayed puberty).
autosomal recessive osteopetrosis 7
MedGen UID:
436770
Concept ID:
C2676766
Disease or Syndrome
Osteopetrosis is a bone disease that makes bones abnormally dense and prone to breakage (fracture). Researchers have described several major types of osteopetrosis, which are usually distinguished by their pattern of inheritance: autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked. The different types of the disorder can also be distinguished by the severity of their signs and symptoms.\n\nAutosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO), which is also called Albers-Schönberg disease, is typically the mildest type of the disorder. Some affected individuals have no symptoms. In these people, the unusually dense bones may be discovered by accident when an x-ray is done for another reason. In affected individuals who develop signs and symptoms, the major features of the condition include multiple bone fractures, abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis) or other spinal abnormalities, arthritis in the hips, and a bone infection called osteomyelitis. These problems usually become apparent in late childhood or adolescence.\n\nAutosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO) is a more severe form of the disorder that becomes apparent in early infancy. Affected individuals have a high risk of bone fracture resulting from seemingly minor bumps and falls. Their abnormally dense skull bones pinch nerves in the head and face (cranial nerves), often resulting in vision loss, hearing loss, and paralysis of facial muscles. Dense bones can also impair the function of bone marrow, preventing it from producing new blood cells and immune system cells. As a result, people with severe osteopetrosis are at risk of abnormal bleeding, a shortage of red blood cells (anemia), and recurrent infections. In the most severe cases, these bone marrow abnormalities can be life-threatening in infancy or early childhood.\n\nOther features of autosomal recessive osteopetrosis can include slow growth and short stature, dental abnormalities, and an enlarged liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly). Depending on the genetic changes involved, people with severe osteopetrosis can also have brain abnormalities, intellectual disability, or recurrent seizures (epilepsy).\n\nA few individuals have been diagnosed with intermediate autosomal osteopetrosis (IAO), a form of the disorder that can have either an autosomal dominant or an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The signs and symptoms of this condition become noticeable in childhood and include an increased risk of bone fracture and anemia. People with this form of the disorder typically do not have life-threatening bone marrow abnormalities. However, some affected individuals have had abnormal calcium deposits (calcifications) in the brain, intellectual disability, and a form of kidney disease called renal tubular acidosis.\n\nRarely, osteopetrosis can have an X-linked pattern of inheritance. In addition to abnormally dense bones, the X-linked form of the disorder is characterized by abnormal swelling caused by a buildup of fluid (lymphedema) and a condition called anhydrotic ectodermal dysplasia that affects the skin, hair, teeth, and sweat glands. Affected individuals also have a malfunctioning immune system (immunodeficiency), which allows severe, recurrent infections to develop. Researchers often refer to this condition as OL-EDA-ID, an acronym derived from each of the major features of the disorder.
histiocytic medullary reticulosis
MedGen UID:
398130
Concept ID:
C2700553
Disease or Syndrome
Omenn syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) associated with erythrodermia, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and alopecia. B cells are mostly absent, T-cell counts are normal to elevated, and T cells are frequently activated and express a restricted T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire (summary by Ege et al., 2005).
leukocyte adhesion deficiency, type iii
MedGen UID:
411605
Concept ID:
C2748536
Disease or Syndrome
Leukocyte adhesion deficiency-3 (LAD3), also known as LAD1 variant (LAD1V), is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by LAD1 (116920)-like immune deficiency and Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT; 273800)-like bleeding problems. LAD3 results from mutations in FERMT3, or KINDLIN3, which encodes an intracellular protein that interacts with beta-integrins in hematopoietic cells. In LAD3, the adhesive functions of integrins on both leukocytes and platelets are disrupted, most likely due to defects in activation-dependent alterations of surface integrins that enable high-avidity binding to ligands on target cells, a process termed 'inside-out signaling' (Svensson et al., 2009; Zimmerman, 2009). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of leukocyte adhesion deficiency, see 116920.
neuroblastoma 1
MedGen UID:
412713
Concept ID:
C2749485
Finding
diamond-blackfan anemia 10
MedGen UID:
412873
Concept ID:
C2750080
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50%, and growth deficiency in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia or no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
diamond-blackfan anemia 9
MedGen UID:
412874
Concept ID:
C2750081
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50%, and growth deficiency in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia or no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 5
MedGen UID:
416514
Concept ID:
C2751293
Disease or Syndrome
hyperuricemic nephropathy, familial juvenile, 2
MedGen UID:
414347
Concept ID:
C2751310
Disease or Syndrome
The two clinical presentations observed in autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease – REN (ADTKD-REN) correlate with the renin protein domains affected by the causative REN variants. Childhood/adolescent onset, the more common presentation (caused by REN variants encoding the signal peptide or prosegment domains), is characterized by decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate, acidosis, hyperkalemia, and anemia early in life, followed by slowly progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) and gout. Adult onset, the less common presentation (caused by REN variants encoding the mature renin peptide), is characterized by gout or mild slowly progressive CKD, beginning in the third decade. Anemia, hyperkalemia, and acidemia do not occur.
atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
414541
Concept ID:
C2752036
Finding
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure caused by platelet thrombi in the microcirculation of the kidney and other organs. The onset of atypical HUS (aHUS) ranges from the neonatal period to adulthood. Genetic aHUS accounts for an estimated 60% of all aHUS. Individuals with genetic aHUS frequently experience relapse even after complete recovery following the presenting episode; 60% of genetic aHUS progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
442875
Concept ID:
C2752037
Finding
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure caused by platelet thrombi in the microcirculation of the kidney and other organs. The onset of atypical HUS (aHUS) ranges from the neonatal period to adulthood. Genetic aHUS accounts for an estimated 60% of all aHUS. Individuals with genetic aHUS frequently experience relapse even after complete recovery following the presenting episode; 60% of genetic aHUS progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
416691
Concept ID:
C2752038
Finding
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure caused by platelet thrombi in the microcirculation of the kidney and other organs. The onset of atypical HUS (aHUS) ranges from the neonatal period to adulthood. Genetic aHUS accounts for an estimated 60% of all aHUS. Individuals with genetic aHUS frequently experience relapse even after complete recovery following the presenting episode; 60% of genetic aHUS progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
414542
Concept ID:
C2752039
Finding
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure caused by platelet thrombi in the microcirculation of the kidney and other organs. The onset of atypical HUS (aHUS) ranges from the neonatal period to adulthood. Genetic aHUS accounts for an estimated 60% of all aHUS. Individuals with genetic aHUS frequently experience relapse even after complete recovery following the presenting episode; 60% of genetic aHUS progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
414167
Concept ID:
C2752040
Finding
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure caused by platelet thrombi in the microcirculation of the kidney and other organs. The onset of atypical HUS (aHUS) ranges from the neonatal period to adulthood. Genetic aHUS accounts for an estimated 60% of all aHUS. Individuals with genetic aHUS frequently experience relapse even after complete recovery following the presenting episode; 60% of genetic aHUS progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
alg8-cdg
MedGen UID:
419692
Concept ID:
C2931002
Disease or Syndrome
CDGs, previously called carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndromes, grew from hereditary multisystem disorders first recognized by Jaeken et al. (1980). The characteristic biochemical abnormality of CDGs is the hypoglycosylation of glycoproteins, which is routinely determined by isoelectric focusing of serum transferrin. Type I CDG comprises those disorders in which there is a defect in the assembly of lipid-linked oligosaccharides or their transfer onto nascent glycoproteins, whereas type II CDG comprises defects of trimming, elongation, and processing of protein-bound glycans. For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). CDG1H is a severe form of CDG. The majority of patients have brain involvement, liver pathology, gastrointestinal symptoms, dysmorphism (including brachydactyly), eye involvement (especially cataract), and skin symptoms. Most patients die within the first year of life (summary by Marques-da-Silva et al., 2017).
cog1 congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
443957
Concept ID:
C2931011
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare form of carbohydrate deficient glycoprotein syndrome with, in the few cases reported to date, variable signs including microcephaly, growth retardation, psychomotor retardation and facial dysmorphism.
epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
418981
Concept ID:
C2931072
Disease or Syndrome
Epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early childhood onset of progressive muscular dystrophy and blistering skin changes (Fine et al., 1989). Fine et al. (1991) reported a revised classification of the subtypes of inherited epidermolysis bullosa. In reports of 2 consensus meetings on EB, Fine et al. (2000, 2008) referred to EB with muscular dystrophy due to PLEC1 mutations as a form of basal simplex EB. Fine et al. (2000, 2008) also eliminated the term 'hemidesmosomal,' which had previously been proposed for this entity (Uitto et al., 1997) because ultrastructural analysis can demonstrate tissue abnormalities of the hemidesmosomes.
nephronophthisis 11
MedGen UID:
462146
Concept ID:
C3150796
Disease or Syndrome
The nephronophthisis (NPH) phenotype is characterized by reduced renal concentrating ability, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal disease, and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before age 30 years. Three age-based clinical subtypes are recognized: infantile, juvenile, and adolescent/adult. Infantile NPH can present in utero with oligohydramnios sequence (limb contractures, pulmonary hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphisms) or postnatally with renal manifestations that progress to ESRD before age 3 years. Juvenile NPH, the most prevalent subtype, typically presents with polydipsia and polyuria, growth retardation, chronic iron-resistant anemia, or other findings related to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension is typically absent due to salt wasting. ESRD develops at a median age of 13 years. Ultrasound findings are increased echogenicity, reduced corticomedullary differentiation, and renal cysts (in 50% of affected individuals). Histologic findings include tubulointerstitial fibrosis, thickened and disrupted tubular basement membrane, sporadic corticomedullary cysts, and normal or reduced kidney size. Adolescent/adult NPH is clinically similar to juvenile NPH, but ESRD develops at a median age of 19 years. Within a subtype, inter- and intrafamilial variability in rate of progression to ESRD is considerable. Approximately 80%-90% of individuals with the NPH phenotype have no extrarenal features (i.e., they have isolated NPH); ~10%-20% have extrarenal manifestations that constitute a recognizable syndrome (e.g., Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Jeune syndrome and related skeletal disorders, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, Senior-Løken syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, COACH syndrome, and oculomotor apraxia, Cogan type).
rajab interstitial lung disease with brain calcifications
MedGen UID:
462260
Concept ID:
C3150910
Disease or Syndrome
Rajab interstitial lung disease with brain calcifications-1 (RILCBC1) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Most patients present in infancy or early childhood with poor growth and interstitial lung disease, which may lead to death. Some may also have liver, skeletal, and renal abnormalities, and most have intracranial calcifications on brain imaging. Some may have early impaired motor development, but most have normal cognitive development (summary by Xu et al., 2018). Genetic Heterogeneity of Rajab Interstitial Lung Disease with Brain Calcifications Also see Rajab interstitial disease with brain calcifications-2 (RILDBC2; 619013), caused by mutation in the FARSA gene (602918).
congenital dyserythropoietic anemia, type iv
MedGen UID:
462276
Concept ID:
C3150926
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type IV is an autosomal dominant inherited red blood cell disorder characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and hemolysis resulting in anemia. Circulating erythroblasts and erythroblasts in the bone marrow show various morphologic abnormalities. Affected individuals with CDAN4 also have increased levels of fetal hemoglobin (summary by Arnaud et al., 2010). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia, see CDAN1 (224120).
hyperuricemia, pulmonary hypertension, renal failure, and alkalosis
MedGen UID:
462559
Concept ID:
C3151209
Disease or Syndrome
HUPRA syndrome is a severe autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by onset in infancy of progressive renal failure leading to electrolyte imbalances, metabolic alkalosis, pulmonary hypertension, hypotonia, and delayed development. Affected individuals are born prematurely (summary by Belostotsky et al., 2011).
cyanosis, transient neonatal
MedGen UID:
462771
Concept ID:
C3151421
Disease or Syndrome
Neonatal cyanosis is characterized by symptoms in the fetus and neonate that gradually abate by 5 to 6 months of age. The disorder is caused by a defect in the fetal hemoglobin chain, which causes reduced affinity for oxygen due to steric inhibition of oxygen binding and/or due to increased oxidation of the fetal hemoglobin molecule to methemoglobin (Hb FM), which has decreased oxygen-binding capacity. Some patients develop anemia resulting from increased destruction of red cells containing abnormal or unstable hemoglobin. The cyanosis resolves spontaneously by 5 to 6 months of age or earlier, as the adult beta-globin chain (HBB; 141900) is produced and replaces the fetal gamma-globin chain (summary by Crowley et al., 2011).
fanconi anemia, complementation group d2
MedGen UID:
463627
Concept ID:
C3160738
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
fanconi anemia, complementation group e
MedGen UID:
463628
Concept ID:
C3160739
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
hypothyroidism, congenital, nongoitrous, 6
MedGen UID:
482447
Concept ID:
C3280817
Disease or Syndrome
encephalomyopathy, mitochondrial, due to voltage-dependent anion channel deficiency
MedGen UID:
482736
Concept ID:
C3281106
Disease or Syndrome
fanconi anemia, complementation group c
MedGen UID:
483324
Concept ID:
C3468041
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
fanconi anemia, complementation group a
MedGen UID:
483333
Concept ID:
C3469521
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
fanconi anemia, complementation group f
MedGen UID:
854016
Concept ID:
C3469526
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
fanconi anemia, complementation group g
MedGen UID:
854017
Concept ID:
C3469527
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
fanconi anemia, complementation group l
MedGen UID:
854018
Concept ID:
C3469528
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
fanconi anemia, complementation group p
MedGen UID:
854020
Concept ID:
C3469542
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
coenzyme q10 deficiency, primary 1
MedGen UID:
764868
Concept ID:
C3551954
Disease or Syndrome
Primary coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is usually associated with multisystem involvement, including neurologic manifestations such as fatal neonatal encephalopathy with hypotonia; a late-onset slowly progressive multiple-system atrophy-like phenotype (neurodegeneration with autonomic failure and various combinations of parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, and pyramidal dysfunction); and dystonia, spasticity, seizures, and intellectual disability. Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), the hallmark renal manifestation, is often the initial manifestation either as isolated renal involvement that progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or associated with encephalopathy (seizures, stroke-like episodes, severe neurologic impairment) resulting in early death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), retinopathy or optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss can also be seen.
lymphoproliferative syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
765548
Concept ID:
C3552634
Disease or Syndrome
Lymphoproliferative syndrome-1 is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by onset in early childhood of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated immune dysregulation, manifest as lymphoma, lymphomatoid granulomatosis, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, Hodgkin disease, and/or hypogammaglobulinemia. Autoimmune disorders, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia or renal disease, may also occur. Patients show a high EBV viral load and decreased invariant natural killer T cells. It is unknown whether patients with ITK mutations are intrinsically susceptible to development of lymphoma or dysgammaglobulinemia in the absence of EBV infection (summary by Stepensky et al., 2011; Linka et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lymphoproliferative syndrome, see XLP1 (308240).
pulmonary fibrosis and/or bone marrow failure, telomere-related, 1
MedGen UID:
766531
Concept ID:
C3553617
Disease or Syndrome
Shortened telomeres can cause a wide variety of clinical features that constitute a phenotypic spectrum. The most severe form is dyskeratosis congenita (see, e.g., 127750), characterized by early childhood onset of skin abnormalities, bone marrow failure, predisposition to malignancy, and risk of pulmonary and hepatic fibrosis. Adult-onset pulmonary fibrosis is the most common manifestation of mutant telomerase genes. Other manifestations include aplastic anemia due to bone marrow failure, hepatic fibrosis, and increased cancer risk, particularly myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Phenotype, age at onset, and severity are determined by telomere length, not just telomerase mutation (summary by Armanios, 2009). The genetic diagnosis of telomere-related bone marrow failure and pulmonary fibrosis has implications for treatment because affected individuals generally do not respond to immunosuppression and may be at increased risk for fatal complications after bone marrow or lung transplantation (Parry et al., 2011). Genetic Heterogeneity of Telomere-Related Pulmonary Fibrosis and/or Bone Marrow Failure Also see PFBMFT2 (614743), caused by mutation in the TERC gene (602322) on chromosome 3q26; PFBMFT3 (616373), caused by mutation in the RTEL1 gene (608833) on chromosome 20q13; PFBMFT4 (616371), caused by mutation in the PARN gene (604212) on chromosome 16p13; and PFBMFT5 (618674), caused by mutation in the ZCCHC8 gene (616381) on chromosome 12q24.
methylmalonic acidemia with homocystinuria, type cblj
MedGen UID:
766829
Concept ID:
C3553915
Disease or Syndrome
Combined methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) and homocystinuria is a genetically heterogeneous metabolic disorder of cobalamin (cbl; vitamin B12) metabolism, which is essential for hematologic and neurologic function. Biochemically, the defect causes decreased levels of the coenzymes adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) and methylcobalamin (MeCbl), which results in decreased activity of the respective enzymes methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT; 609058) and methyltetrahydrofolate:homocysteine methyltransferase, also known as methionine synthase (MTR; 156570). The cblJ type is phenotypically and biochemically similar to the cblF type (MAHCF; 277380) (summary by Coelho et al., 2012).
diamond-blackfan anemia 11
MedGen UID:
766956
Concept ID:
C3554042
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50%, and growth deficiency in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia or no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 14
MedGen UID:
767082
Concept ID:
C3554168
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of FARS2 deficiency ranges from the infantile-onset phenotype, characterized by epileptic encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and poor prognosis (70% of affected individuals), to the later-onset phenotype, characterized by spastic paraplegia, less severe neurologic manifestations, and longer survival (30% of affected individuals). To date FARS2 deficiency has been reported in 37 individuals from 25 families. Infantile-onset phenotype. Seizures are difficult to control and may progress quickly at an early age to intractable seizures with frequent status epilepticus; some children have hypsarrhythmia on EEG. All have developmental delay; most are nonverbal and unable to walk. Feeding difficulties are common. More than half of affected children die in early childhood. Later-onset phenotype. All affected individuals have spastic paraplegia manifested by weakness, spasticity, and exaggerated reflexes of the lower extremities associated with walking difficulties; some have developmental delay/intellectual disability; some have brief seizures that resolve over time.
osteopetrosis, autosomal recessive 8
MedGen UID:
767392
Concept ID:
C3554478
Disease or Syndrome
A sub-type of autosomal recessive osteopetrosis caused by mutation(s) in the SNX10 gene, encoding sorting nexin-10.
anemia, hypochromic microcytic, with iron overload 1
MedGen UID:
812483
Concept ID:
C3806153
Disease or Syndrome
Hypochromic microcytic anemia with iron overload is a condition that impairs the normal transport of iron in cells. Iron is an essential component of hemoglobin, which is the substance that red blood cells use to carry oxygen to cells and tissues throughout the body. In this condition, red blood cells cannot access iron in the blood, so there is a decrease of red blood cell production (anemia) that is apparent at birth. The red blood cells that are produced are abnormally small (microcytic) and pale (hypochromic). Hypochromic microcytic anemia with iron overload can lead to pale skin (pallor), tiredness (fatigue), and slow growth.\n\nIn hypochromic microcytic anemia with iron overload, the iron that is not used by red blood cells accumulates in the liver, which can impair its function over time. The liver problems typically become apparent in adolescence or early adulthood.
hypochromic microcytic anemia with iron overload 2
MedGen UID:
815250
Concept ID:
C3808920
Disease or Syndrome
STEAP3/TSAP6-related sideroblastic anemia is a very rare severe non-syndromic hypochromic anemia, which is characterized by transfusion-dependent hypochromic, poorly regenerative anemia, iron overload, resembling non-syndromic sideroblastic anemia (see this term) except for increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels.
severe congenital neutropenia 5, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
815361
Concept ID:
C3809031
Disease or Syndrome
Severe congenital neutropenia-5 is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized primarily by neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction, a lack of response to G-CSF, life-threatening infections, bone marrow fibrosis, and renal extramedullary hematopoiesis (summary by Vilboux et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of severe congenital neutropenia, see SCN1 (202700).
infantile liver failure syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
815852
Concept ID:
C3809522
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, genetic, parenchymal hepatic disease characterized by acute liver failure, that occurs in the first year of life, which manifests with failure to thrive, hypotonia, moderate global developmental delay, seizures, abnormal liver function tests, microcytic anemia and elevated serum lactate. Other associated features include hepatosteatosis and fibrosis, abnormal brain morphology, and renal tubulopathy. Minor illness exacerbates deterioration of liver failure.
congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type type 1b
MedGen UID:
816515
Concept ID:
C3810185
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I (CDA I) is characterized by moderate-to-severe macrocytic anemia presenting occasionally in utero as severe anemia associated with hydrops fetalis but more commonly in neonates as hepatomegaly, early jaundice, and intrauterine growth retardation. Some cases present in childhood or adulthood. After the neonatal period, most affected individuals have lifelong moderate anemia, usually accompanied by jaundice and splenomegaly. Secondary hemochromatosis develops with age as a result of increased iron absorption even in those who are not transfused. Distal limb anomalies occur in 4%-14% of affected individuals.
bone marrow failure syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
816680
Concept ID:
C3810350
Disease or Syndrome
Bone marrow failure syndrome-2 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by trilineage bone marrow failure, learning disabilities, and microcephaly. Cutaneous features and increased chromosome breakage are not features (Tummala et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of BMFS, see BMFS1 (614675).
polyarteritis nodosa, childhoood-onset
MedGen UID:
854497
Concept ID:
C3887654
Disease or Syndrome
Adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency (DADA2) is a complex systemic autoinflammatory disorder in which vasculopathy/vasculitis, dysregulated immune function, and/or hematologic abnormalities may predominate. Inflammatory features include intermittent fevers, rash (often livedo racemosa/reticularis), and musculoskeletal involvement (myalgia/arthralgia, arthritis, myositis). Vasculitis, which usually begins before age ten years, may manifest as early-onset ischemic (lacunar) and/or hemorrhagic strokes, or as cutaneous or systemic polyarteritis nodosa. Hypertension and hepatosplenomegaly are often found. More severe involvement may lead to progressive central neurologic deficits (dysarthria, ataxia, cranial nerve palsies, cognitive impairment) or to ischemic injury to the kidney, intestine, and/or digits. Dysregulation of immune function can lead to immunodeficiency or autoimmunity of varying severity; lymphadenopathy may be present and some affected individuals have had lymphoproliferative disease. Hematologic disorders may begin early in life or in late adulthood, and can include lymphopenia, neutropenia, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, or pancytopenia. Of note, both interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic variability (e.g., in age of onset, frequency and severity of manifestations) can be observed; also, individuals with biallelic ADA2 pathogenic variants may remain asymptomatic until adulthood or may never develop clinical manifestations of DADA2.
hemoglobin nyu
MedGen UID:
855075
Concept ID:
C3889376
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) niigata
MedGen UID:
855968
Concept ID:
C3891406
Finding
hemoglobin parchman
MedGen UID:
856015
Concept ID:
C3891453
Finding
hemoglobin a(2)-prime
MedGen UID:
856098
Concept ID:
C3891919
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) adria
MedGen UID:
856099
Concept ID:
C3891920
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) babinga
MedGen UID:
856100
Concept ID:
C3891921
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) canada
MedGen UID:
856101
Concept ID:
C3891922
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) coburg
MedGen UID:
856102
Concept ID:
C3891923
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) fitzroy
MedGen UID:
856103
Concept ID:
C3891924
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) flatbush
MedGen UID:
856104
Concept ID:
C3891925
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) honai
MedGen UID:
856105
Concept ID:
C3891926
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) indonesia
MedGen UID:
856106
Concept ID:
C3891927
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) manzanares
MedGen UID:
856107
Concept ID:
C3891928
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) melbourne
MedGen UID:
856108
Concept ID:
C3891929
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) nyu
MedGen UID:
856109
Concept ID:
C3891930
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) roosevelt
MedGen UID:
856110
Concept ID:
C3891931
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) sphakia
MedGen UID:
856111
Concept ID:
C3891932
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) victoria
MedGen UID:
856112
Concept ID:
C3891933
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) yokoshima
MedGen UID:
856113
Concept ID:
C3891934
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) zagreb
MedGen UID:
856114
Concept ID:
C3891935
Finding
hemoglobin lepore (baltimore)
MedGen UID:
856115
Concept ID:
C3891936
Finding
hemoglobin lepore (hollandia)
MedGen UID:
856116
Concept ID:
C3891937
Finding
disseminated atypical mycobacterial infection
MedGen UID:
860386
Concept ID:
C4011949
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-27A results from autosomal recessive (AR) IFNGR1 deficiency. Patients with complete IFNGR1 deficiency have a severe clinical phenotype characterized by early and often fatal mycobacterial infections. The disorder can thus be categorized as a form of mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD). bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and environmental mycobacteria are the most frequent pathogens, and infection typically begins before the age of 3 years. Plasma from patients with complete AR IFNGR1 deficiency usually contains large amounts of IFNG (147570), and their cells do not respond to IFNG in vitro. In contrast, cells from patients with partial AR IFNGR1 deficiency, which is caused by a specific mutation in IFNGR1, retain residual responses to high IFNG concentrations. Patients with partial AR IFNGR1 deficiency are susceptible to BCG and environmental mycobacteria, but they have a milder clinical disease and better prognosis than patients with complete AR IFNGR1 deficiency. The clinical features of children with complete AR IFNGR1 deficiency are usually more severe than those in individuals with AD IFNGR1 deficiency (IMD27B), and mycobacterial infection often occurs earlier (mean age of 1.3 years vs 13.4 years), with patients having shorter mean disease-free survival. Salmonellosis is present in about 5% of patients with AR or AD IFNGR1 deficiency, and other infections have been reported in single patients (review by Al-Muhsen and Casanova, 2008).
short stature with microcephaly and distinctive facies
MedGen UID:
862776
Concept ID:
C4014339
Disease or Syndrome
Short stature with microcephaly and distinctive facies is characterized by pre- or postnatal growth retardation, frontal bossing, high forehead, sparse hair and eyebrows, and telecanthus. Patients also show skin dyspigmentation, with hyper- and/or hypopigmented areas (Leduc et al., 2016).
mitochondrial complex iii deficiency, nuclear type 8
MedGen UID:
862877
Concept ID:
C4014440
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency, nuclear type 8, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive neurodegeneration with onset in childhood. Affected individuals may have normal or delayed early development, and often have episodic acute neurologic decompensation and regression associated with febrile illnesses. The developmental regression results in variable intellectual disability and motor deficits, such as hypotonia, axial hypertonia, and spasticity; some patients may lose the ability to walk independently. Laboratory studies show increased serum lactate and isolated deficiency of mitochondrial complex III in skeletal muscle and fibroblasts. Brain imaging shows a characteristic pattern of multifocal small cystic lesions in the periventricular and deep cerebral white matter (summary by Dallabona et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex III deficiency, see MC3DN1 (124000).
sting-associated vasculopathy, infantile-onset
MedGen UID:
863159
Concept ID:
C4014722
Disease or Syndrome
STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy is an autoinflammatory vasculopathy causing severe skin lesions, particularly affecting the face, ears, nose, and digits, and resulting in ulceration, eschar formation, necrosis, and, in some cases, amputation. Many patients have interstitial lung disease. Tissue biopsy and laboratory findings show a hyperinflammatory state, with evidence of increased beta-interferon (IFNB1; 147640) signaling (summary by Liu et al., 2014).
autoinflammation with infantile enterocolitis
MedGen UID:
863504
Concept ID:
C4015067
Disease or Syndrome
Autoinflammation with infantile enterocolitis is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by onset of recurrent flares of autoinflammation in early infancy. Affected individuals tend to have poor overall growth and gastrointestinal symptoms in infancy associated with laboratory evidence of activated inflammation. This initial presentation is followed by recurrent febrile episodes with splenomegaly and sometimes hematologic disturbances, arthralgias, or myalgias. The disorder results from overactivation of an arm of the immune response system (Romberg et al., 2014; Canna et al., 2014).
platelet-type bleeding disorder 19
MedGen UID:
863842
Concept ID:
C4015405
Disease or Syndrome
A rare isolated hereditary giant platelet disorder characterized by severe thrombocytopenia and thrombopathy due to defects in proplatelet formation and platelet activation in homozygous patients. Clinical manifestation are recurrent bleeding episodes including epistaxis, spontaneous hematomas, and menorrhagia.
thrombocytopenia 5
MedGen UID:
863974
Concept ID:
C4015537
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with ETV6 thrombocytopenia and predisposition to leukemia most often present with a lifelong history of thrombocytopenia, which is usually in the mild to moderate range. No syndromic features or associations are consistently shared across pedigrees. Affected individuals also have a moderate risk of developing a hematologic malignancy (with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia [B-ALL] being the most common) and possibly other malignant solid tumors, particularly colorectal cancer.
hemoglobin a(2) wrens
MedGen UID:
864613
Concept ID:
C4016176
Finding
hemoglobin lepore (boston)
MedGen UID:
864614
Concept ID:
C4016177
Finding
delta-zero-thalassemia, knossos type
MedGen UID:
864615
Concept ID:
C4016178
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) corfu
MedGen UID:
864616
Concept ID:
C4016179
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) parkville
MedGen UID:
864617
Concept ID:
C4016180
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) pelendri
MedGen UID:
864618
Concept ID:
C4016181
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) sant' antioco
MedGen UID:
864619
Concept ID:
C4016182
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) agrinio
MedGen UID:
864620
Concept ID:
C4016183
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) monreale
MedGen UID:
864621
Concept ID:
C4016184
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) metaponto
MedGen UID:
864622
Concept ID:
C4016185
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) campania
MedGen UID:
864623
Concept ID:
C4016186
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) lucania
MedGen UID:
864624
Concept ID:
C4016187
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) capri
MedGen UID:
864625
Concept ID:
C4016188
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) ninive
MedGen UID:
864626
Concept ID:
C4016189
Finding
delta-plus-thalassemia
MedGen UID:
864627
Concept ID:
C4016190
Finding
hemoglobin b(2)
MedGen UID:
865966
Concept ID:
C4017529
Finding
hemoglobin flatbush (georgia)
MedGen UID:
865967
Concept ID:
C4017530
Finding
hemoglobin lepore (washington)
MedGen UID:
865968
Concept ID:
C4017531
Finding
hemoglobin lepore (augusta)
MedGen UID:
865969
Concept ID:
C4017532
Finding
hemoglobin pylos
MedGen UID:
865970
Concept ID:
C4017533
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) troodos
MedGen UID:
865971
Concept ID:
C4017534
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) yialousa
MedGen UID:
865972
Concept ID:
C4017535
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) grovetown
MedGen UID:
865973
Concept ID:
C4017536
Finding
hemoglobin a(2) puglia
MedGen UID:
866165
Concept ID:
C4017728
Finding
fanconi anemia, complementation group t
MedGen UID:
896157
Concept ID:
C4084840
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
sideroblastic anemia 3, pyridoxine-refractory
MedGen UID:
895975
Concept ID:
C4225155
Disease or Syndrome
Sideroblastic anemia-3 is an autosomal recessive hematologic disorder characterized by onset of anemia in adulthood. Affected individuals show signs of systemic iron overload, and iron chelation therapy may be of clinical benefit (summary by Liu et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of sideroblastic anemia, see SIDBA1 (300751).
immunodeficiency 46
MedGen UID:
906483
Concept ID:
C4225219
Disease or Syndrome
radioulnar synostosis with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia 2
MedGen UID:
901732
Concept ID:
C4225221
Disease or Syndrome
Radioulnar synostosis with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (RUSAT) is characterized by thrombocytopenia that progresses to pancytopenia, in association with congenital proximal fusion of the radius and ulna that results in extremely limited pronation and supination of the forearm (summary by Niihori et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of radioulnar synostosis with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia, see RUSAT1 (605432).
short stature, microcephaly, and endocrine dysfunction
MedGen UID:
895448
Concept ID:
C4225288
Disease or Syndrome
In patients with SSMED, short stature and microcephaly are apparent at birth, and there is progressive postnatal growth failure. Endocrine dysfunction, including hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, multinodular goiter, and diabetes mellitus, is present in affected adults. Progressive ataxia has been reported in some patients, with onset ranging from the second to fifth decade of life. In addition, a few patients have developed tumors, suggesting that there may be a predisposition to tumorigenesis. In contrast to syndromes involving defects in other components of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) complex (see, e.g., 606593), no clinically overt immunodeficiency has been observed in SSMED, although laboratory analysis has revealed lymphopenia or borderline leukopenia in some patients (Murray et al., 2015; Bee et al., 2015; de Bruin et al., 2015; Guo et al., 2015).
epileptic encephalopathy, early infantile, 50
MedGen UID:
904125
Concept ID:
C4225320
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-50 (DEE50) is an autosomal recessive progressive neurodegenerative neurometabolic disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, early-onset refractory seizures, severe developmental regression, and normocytic anemia. Onset is within the first months or years of life. Evidence suggests that affected children can have a favorable response to treatment with uridine (summary by Koch et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
interstitial lung and liver disease
MedGen UID:
895551
Concept ID:
C4225400
Disease or Syndrome
Interstitial lung and liver disease is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset of respiratory insufficiency and progressive liver disease in infancy or early childhood. Pathologic examination of lung lavage is consistent with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (summary by Hadchouel et al., 2015).
anemia, sideroblastic, 2, pyridoxine-refractory
MedGen UID:
899109
Concept ID:
C4225425
Disease or Syndrome
mirage syndrome
MedGen UID:
924576
Concept ID:
C4284088
Disease or Syndrome
MIRAGE syndrome is an acronym for the major findings of myelodysplasia, infection, restriction of growth, adrenal hypoplasia, genital phenotypes, and enteropathy. Cytopenias are typically seen soon after birth; Thrombocytopenia is the most common followed by anemia and pancytopenia. Recurrent infections from early infancy include pneumonia, urinary tract infection, gastroenteritis, meningitis, otitis media, dermatitis, subcutaneous abscess, and sepsis. Reported genital phenotypes in those with 46,XY karyotype included hypospadias, microphallus, bifid shawl scrotum, ambiguous genitalia, or complete female genitalia. Hypoplastic or dysgenetic ovaries have been reported in females. Gastrointestinal complications include chronic diarrhea and esophageal dysfunction. Moderate-to-severe global developmental delay is reported in most affected individuals. Autonomic dysfunction and renal dysfunction are also reported.
mucopolysaccharidosis-plus syndrome
MedGen UID:
934594
Concept ID:
C4310627
Disease or Syndrome
MPSPS is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism resulting in a multisystem disorder with features of the mucopolysaccharidosis lysosomal storage diseases (see, e.g., 607016). Patients present in infancy or early childhood with respiratory difficulties, cardiac problems, anemia, dysostosis multiplex, renal involvement, coarse facies, and delayed psychomotor development. Most patients die of cardiorespiratory failure in the first years of life (summary by Kondo et al., 2017).
hydrops fetalis, nonimmune, and/or atrial septal defect, susceptibility to
MedGen UID:
934596
Concept ID:
C4310629
Disease or Syndrome
LMPHM7 is an autosomal dominant disorder with variable expressivity. Some patients may develop severe nonimmune lymphatic-related hydrops fetalis (LRHF) in utero, resulting in early death, whereas others may have milder manifestations, such as atrial septal defect (ASD) or varicose veins as adults. The hydrops and/or swelling improves spontaneously in those who survive the neonatal period (summary by Martin-Almedina et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lymphatic malformation, see 153100.
fanconi anemia, complementation group v
MedGen UID:
934619
Concept ID:
C4310652
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
hyperuricemic nephropathy, familial juvenile, 4
MedGen UID:
934708
Concept ID:
C4310741
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease-5 (ADTKD5) is characterized by the onset of progressive chronic renal disease in the first decades of life. Mild hyperuricemia may be present, but gout, hypertension, and proteinuria are usually absent. The disease may be associated with anemia or neutropenia. Some patients may have additional findings, including poor overall growth and impaired cognitive function. Renal biopsy shows tubulointerstitial abnormalities with atrophic tubules and fibrosis; secondary glomerular abnormalities and simple cysts may also be present (summary by Bolar et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity and revised nomenclature of ADTKD, see ADTKD1 (162000).
retinitis pigmentosa and erythrocytic microcytosis
MedGen UID:
934743
Concept ID:
C4310776
Disease or Syndrome
Features that occur less commonly in people with TRNT1 deficiency include hearing loss caused by abnormalities of the inner ear (sensorineural hearing loss), recurrent seizures (epilepsy), and problems with the kidneys or heart.\n\nTRNT1 deficiency encompasses what was first thought to be two separate disorders, a severe disorder called sideroblastic anemia with B-cell immunodeficiency, periodic fevers, and developmental delay (SIFD) and a milder disorder called retinitis pigmentosa with erythrocytic microcytosis (RPEM), each named for its most common features. SIFD begins in infancy, and affected individuals usually do not survive past childhood. RPEM, on the other hand, is recognized in early adulthood, and the microcytosis usually does not cause any health problems. However, it has since been recognized that some individuals have a combination of features that fall between these two ends of the severity spectrum. All of these cases are now considered part of TRNT1 deficiency.\n\nNeurological problems are also frequent in TRNT1 deficiency. Many affected individuals have delayed development of speech and motor skills, such as sitting, standing, and walking, and some have low muscle tone (hypotonia).\n\nEye abnormalities, often involving the light-sensing tissue at the back of the eye (the retina), can occur in people with TRNT1 deficiency. Some of these individuals have a condition called retinitis pigmentosa, in which the light-sensing cells of the retina gradually deteriorate. Eye problems in TRNT1 deficiency can lead to vision loss.\n\nIn addition, many individuals with TRNT1 deficiency have recurrent fevers that are not caused by an infection. These fever episodes are often one of the earliest recognized symptoms of TRNT1 deficiency, usually beginning in infancy. The fever episodes are typically accompanied by poor feeding, vomiting, and diarrhea, and can lead to hospitalization. In many affected individuals, the episodes occur regularly, arising approximately every 2 to 4 weeks and lasting 5 to 7 days, although the frequency can decrease with age.\n\nMany people with TRNT1 deficiency have an immune system disorder (immunodeficiency) that can lead to recurrent bacterial infections. Repeated infections can cause life-threatening damage to internal organs. The immunodeficiency is characterized by low numbers of immune system cells called B cells, which normally help fight infections by producing immune proteins called antibodies (or immunoglobulins). These proteins target foreign invaders such as bacteria and viruses and mark them for destruction. In many individuals with TRNT1 deficiency, the amount of immunoglobulins is also low (hypogammaglobulinemia).\n\nA common feature of TRNT1 deficiency is a blood condition called sideroblastic anemia, which is characterized by a shortage of red blood cells (anemia). In TRNT1 deficiency, the red blood cells that are present are unusually small (erythrocytic microcytosis). In addition, developing red blood cells in the bone marrow (erythroblasts) can have an abnormal buildup of iron that appears as a ring of blue staining in the cell after treatment in the lab with certain dyes. These abnormal cells are called ring sideroblasts.\n\nTRNT1 deficiency is a condition that affects many body systems. Its signs and symptoms can involve blood cells, the immune system, the eyes, and the nervous system. The severity of the signs and symptoms vary widely.
midface hypoplasia, hearing impairment, elliptocytosis, and nephrocalcinosis
MedGen UID:
934777
Concept ID:
C4310810
Disease or Syndrome
Midface hypoplasia, hearing impairment, elliptocytosis, and nephrocalcinosis is an X-linked recessive disorder with onset of features in early childhood. Anemia is sometimes present. Some patients may show mild early motor or speech delay, but cognition is normal (summary by Andreoletti et al., 2017).
kenny-caffey syndrome type 2
MedGen UID:
1373312
Concept ID:
C4316787
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, primary bone dysplasia characterized by severe growth retardation, short stature, cortical thickening and medullary stenosis of long bones, delayed closure of the anterior fontanelle, absent diploic space in the skull bones, prominent forehead, macrocephaly, dental anomalies, eye problems (hypermetropia and pseudopapilledema), and hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism, sometimes resulting in convulsions. Intelligence is normal.
diamond-blackfan anemia 16
MedGen UID:
1385861
Concept ID:
C4479424
Disease or Syndrome
diamond-blackfan anemia 17
MedGen UID:
1373199
Concept ID:
C4479428
Disease or Syndrome
thrombocytopenia, anemia, and myelofibrosis
MedGen UID:
1378448
Concept ID:
C4479504
Disease or Syndrome
specific granule deficiency 2
MedGen UID:
1371952
Concept ID:
C4479548
Disease or Syndrome
Specific granule deficiency-2 is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by recurrent infections due to defective neutrophil development. Bone marrow findings include hypercellularity, abnormal megakaryocytes, and features of progressive myelofibrosis with blasts. The disorder is apparent from infancy, and most patients die in early childhood unless they undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Some patients may have additional findings, including delayed development, mild dysmorphic features, and distal skeletal anomalies (summary by Witzel et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of SGD, see SGD1 (245480).
familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis 1
MedGen UID:
1642840
Concept ID:
C4551514
Disease or Syndrome
focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 1
MedGen UID:
1636833
Concept ID:
C4551527
Disease or Syndrome
Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a pathologic finding in several renal disorders that manifest clinically as proteinuria and progressive decline in renal function. Some patients with FSGS develop the clinical entity called 'nephrotic syndrome' (see NPHS1; 256300), which includes massive proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, hyperlipidemia, and edema. However, patients with FSGS may have proteinuria in the nephrotic range without other features of the nephrotic syndrome (summary by D'Agati et al., 2004; Mathis et al., 1998). D'Agati et al. (2011) provided a detailed review of FSGS, emphasizing that the disorder results from defects of the podocyte. Because of confusion in the literature regarding use of the terms 'nephrotic syndrome' and 'focal segmental glomerulosclerosis' (see NOMENCLATURE section), these disorders in OMIM are classified as NPHS or FSGS according to how they were first designated in the literature. Genetic Heterogeneity of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis and Nephrotic Syndrome Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and nephrotic syndrome are genetically heterogeneous disorders representing a spectrum of hereditary renal diseases. See also FSGS2 (603965), caused by mutation in the TRPC6 gene (603652); FSGS3 (607832), associated with variation in the CD2AP gene (604241); FSGS4 (612551), mapped to chromosome 22q12; FSGS5 (613237), caused by mutation in the INF2 gene (610982); FSGS6 (614131), caused by mutation in the MYO1E gene (601479); FSGS7 (616002), caused by mutation in the PAX2 gene (167409); FSGS8 (616032), caused by mutation in the ANLN gene (616027); FSGS9 (616220), caused by mutation in the CRB2 gene (609720); and FSGS10 (256020), caused by mutation in the LMX1B gene (602575). See also NPHS1 (256300), caused by mutation in the NPHS1 gene (602716); NPHS2 (600995), caused by mutation in the podocin gene (604766); NPHS3 (610725), caused by mutation in the PLCE1 gene (608414); NPHS4 (256370), caused by mutation in the WT1 gene (607102); NPHS5 (614199), caused by mutation in the LAMB2 gene (150325); NPHS6 (614196), caused by mutation in the PTPRO gene (600579); NPHS7 (615008), caused by mutation in the DGKE gene (601440); NPHS8 (615244), caused by mutation in the ARHGDIA gene (601925); NPHS9 (615573), caused by mutation in the COQ8B gene (615567); NPHS10 (615861), caused by mutation in the EMP2 gene (602334); NPHS11 (616730), caused by mutation in the NUP107 gene (607617); NPHS12 (616892), caused by mutation in the NUP93 gene (614351); NPHS13 (616893), caused by mutation in the NUP205 gene (614352); NPHS14 (617575), caused by mutation in the SGPL1 gene (603729); NPHS15 (617609), caused by mutation in the MAGI2 gene (606382); NPHS16 (617783), caused by mutation in the KANK2 gene (614610), NPHS17 (618176), caused by mutation in the NUP85 gene (170285); NPHS18 (618177), caused by mutation in the NUP133 gene (607613); NPHS19 (618178), caused by mutation in the NUP160 gene (607614); NPHS20 (301028), caused by mutation in the TBC1D8B gene (301027); and NPHS21 (618594) caused by mutation in the AVIL gene (613397).
senior-loken syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1639722
Concept ID:
C4551559
Disease or Syndrome
Nephronophthisis causes fluid-filled cysts to develop in the kidneys beginning in childhood. These cysts impair kidney function, initially causing increased urine production (polyuria), excessive thirst (polydipsia), general weakness, and extreme tiredness (fatigue). Nephronophthisis leads to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) later in childhood or in adolescence. ESRD is a life-threatening failure of kidney function that occurs when the kidneys are no longer able to filter fluids and waste products from the body effectively.\n\nLeber congenital amaurosis primarily affects the retina, which is the specialized tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color. This condition causes vision problems, including an increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), involuntary movements of the eyes (nystagmus), and extreme farsightedness (hyperopia). Some people with Senior-Løken syndrome develop the signs of Leber congenital amaurosis within the first few years of life, while others do not develop vision problems until later in childhood.\n\nSenior-Løken syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of two specific features: a kidney condition called nephronophthisis and an eye condition known as Leber congenital amaurosis.
hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia type 1
MedGen UID:
1643786
Concept ID:
C4551861
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is characterized by the presence of multiple arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) that lack intervening capillaries and result in direct connections between arteries and veins. The most common clinical manifestation is spontaneous and recurrent nosebleeds (epistaxis) beginning on average at age 12 years. Telangiectases (small AVMs) are most evident on the lips, tongue, buccal mucosa, face, chest, and fingers. The average age of onset is generally later than epistaxis, but may be during childhood. Large AVMs often cause symptoms when they occur in the lungs, liver, or brain; complications from bleeding or shunting may be sudden and catastrophic. Approximately 25% of individuals with HHT have GI bleeding, which most commonly begins after age 50 years.
dyskeratosis congenita, autosomal dominant 1
MedGen UID:
1645250
Concept ID:
C4551974
Disease or Syndrome
Dyskeratosis congenita (DC), a telomere biology disorder, is characterized by a classic triad of dysplastic nails, lacy reticular pigmentation of the upper chest and/or neck, and oral leukoplakia. The classic triad may not be present in all individuals. People with DC are at increased risk for progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), solid tumors (usually squamous cell carcinoma of the head/neck or anogenital cancer), and pulmonary fibrosis. Other findings can include: abnormal pigmentation changes not restricted to the upper chest and neck, eye abnormalities (epiphora, blepharitis, sparse eyelashes, ectropion, entropion, trichiasis), and dental abnormalities (caries, periodontal disease, taurodauntism). Although most persons with DC have normal psychomotor development and normal neurologic function, significant developmental delay is present in the two variants in which additional findings include cerebellar hypoplasia (Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome) and bilateral exudative retinopathy and intracranial calcifications (Revesz syndrome). Onset and progression of manifestations of DC vary: at the mild end of the spectrum are those who have only minimal physical findings with normal bone marrow function, and at the severe end are those who have the diagnostic triad and early-onset BMF.
nephronophthisis 1
MedGen UID:
1638799
Concept ID:
C4551979
Disease or Syndrome
The nephronophthisis (NPH) phenotype is characterized by reduced renal concentrating ability, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal disease, and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before age 30 years. Three age-based clinical subtypes are recognized: infantile, juvenile, and adolescent/adult. Infantile NPH can present in utero with oligohydramnios sequence (limb contractures, pulmonary hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphisms) or postnatally with renal manifestations that progress to ESRD before age 3 years. Juvenile NPH, the most prevalent subtype, typically presents with polydipsia and polyuria, growth retardation, chronic iron-resistant anemia, or other findings related to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension is typically absent due to salt wasting. ESRD develops at a median age of 13 years. Ultrasound findings are increased echogenicity, reduced corticomedullary differentiation, and renal cysts (in 50% of affected individuals). Histologic findings include tubulointerstitial fibrosis, thickened and disrupted tubular basement membrane, sporadic corticomedullary cysts, and normal or reduced kidney size. Adolescent/adult NPH is clinically similar to juvenile NPH, but ESRD develops at a median age of 19 years. Within a subtype, inter- and intrafamilial variability in rate of progression to ESRD is considerable. Approximately 80%-90% of individuals with the NPH phenotype have no extrarenal features (i.e., they have isolated NPH); ~10%-20% have extrarenal manifestations that constitute a recognizable syndrome (e.g., Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Jeune syndrome and related skeletal disorders, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, Senior-Løken syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, COACH syndrome, and oculomotor apraxia, Cogan type).
cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts 1
MedGen UID:
1636142
Concept ID:
C4552029
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts (CRMCC), also known as Coats plus syndrome, is an autosomal recessive pleomorphic disorder characterized primarily by intracranial calcifications, leukodystrophy, and brain cysts, resulting in spasticity, ataxia, dystonia, seizures, and cognitive decline. Patients also have retinal telangiectasia and exudates (Coats disease) as well as extraneurologic manifestations, including osteopenia with poor bone healing and a high risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and portal hypertension caused by vasculature ectasias in the stomach, small intestine, and liver. Some individuals also have hair, skin, and nail changes, as well as anemia and thrombocytopenia (summary by Anderson et al., 2012 and Polvi et al., 2012). Leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications, and cysts (LCC), also known as Labrune syndrome (614561), has similar central nervous system features as CRMCC in the absence of extraneurologic or systemic manifestations. Although Coats plus syndrome and Labrune syndrome were initially thought to be manifestations of the same disorder, namely CRMCC, molecular evidence has excluded mutations in the CTC1 gene in patients with Labrune syndrome, suggesting that the 2 disorders are not allelic (Anderson et al., 2012; Polvi et al., 2012). Some features of CRMCC resemble those observed in dyskeratosis congenita (see, e.g., 127550), which is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous telomere-related genetic disorder. Genetic Heterogeneity of Cerebroretinal Microangiopathy With Calcifications And Cysts See also CRMCC2 (617341), caused by mutation in the STN1 gene (613128) on chromosome 10q24.
fanconi anemia, complementation group s
MedGen UID:
1632414
Concept ID:
C4554406
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
shwachman-diamond syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1640046
Concept ID:
C4692625
Disease or Syndrome
Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is characterized by: exocrine pancreatic dysfunction with malabsorption, malnutrition, and growth failure; hematologic abnormalities with single- or multilineage cytopenias and susceptibility to myelodysplasia syndrome (MDS) and acute myelogeneous leukemia (AML); and bone abnormalities. In almost all affected children, persistent or intermittent neutropenia is a common presenting finding, often before the diagnosis of SDS is made. Short stature and recurrent infections are common.
acute erythroleukemia, familial
MedGen UID:
1648472
Concept ID:
C4746575
Finding
Familial erythroleukemia is a leukemic or preleukemic state in which red cell proliferation is the predominant feature. Hematologic characteristics include particularly ineffective and hyperplastic erythropoiesis with megaloblastic components accompanied by myeloblastic proliferation of varying degree (Park et al., 2002). Park et al. (2002) discussed the evolution of the definition of 'erythroleukemia,' which is considered by most to be a subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML; 601626). Controversy about the precise definition of erythroleukemia revolves around the number or percentage of erythroblasts and myeloblasts found in the bone marrow and peripheral circulation. In the French-American-British (FAB) classification system (Bennett et al., 1985), it is known as AML-M6, whereas in the revised World Health Organization (WHO) classification system (Harris et al., 1999), it is known as 'AML, not otherwise categorized' (Zini and D'Onofrio, 2004).
proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1648456
Concept ID:
C4747850
Disease or Syndrome
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome-3 is an autosomal recessive syndrome with onset in early infancy. Affected individuals present with nodular dermatitis, recurrent fever, myositis, panniculitis-induced lipodystrophy, lymphadenopathy, and dysregulation of the immune response, particularly associated with abnormal type I interferon-induced gene expression patterns. Additional features are highly variable, but may include joint contractures, hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, recurrent infections, autoantibodies, and hypergammaglobulinemia. Some patients may have intracranial calcifications (summary by Brehm et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PRAAS, see PRAAS1 (256040).
developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 66
MedGen UID:
1648486
Concept ID:
C4748070
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-66 (DEE66) is a neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of various types of seizures in the first days or weeks of life. Most seizures have focal origins; secondary generalization is common. Seizure control is difficult at first, but may become easier with time. Affected individuals show global developmental delay with hypotonia, behavioral abnormalities, and dysmorphic features or ophthalmologic defects. Brain imaging often shows cerebellar dysgenesis. A subset of patients have extraneurologic manifestations, including hematologic and distal limb abnormalities (summary by Olson et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
osteopetrosis, autosomal dominant 3
MedGen UID:
1648454
Concept ID:
C4748197
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis-3 is characterized by phenotypic variability. Some patients have typical features of osteopetrosis, including fractures after minor trauma, early tooth loss, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, and a generalized increase in bone mineral density, whereas other patients exhibit localized osteosclerosis and generalized osteopenia. OPTA3 represents a relatively malignant form of osteopetrosis in some patients who develop significant pancytopenia and hepatosplenomegaly (Bo et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis, see OPTA1 (607634).
bone marrow failure syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
1648485
Concept ID:
C4748257
Disease or Syndrome
BMFS4 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early-onset anemia, leukopenia, and decreased B cells, resulting in the necessity for red cell transfusion and sometimes causing an increased susceptibility to infection. Some patients may have thrombocytopenia or variable additional nonhematologic features, such as facial dysmorphism, skeletal anomalies, and mild developmental delay. Bone marrow transplantation is curative (summary by Bahrami et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of BMFS, see BMFS1 (614675).
bone marrow failure syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
1648380
Concept ID:
C4748488
Disease or Syndrome
Bone marrow failure syndrome-5 (BMFS5) is a hematologic disorder characterized by infantile onset of severe red cell anemia requiring transfusion. Additional features include hypogammaglobulinemia, poor growth with microcephaly, developmental delay, and seizures (summary by Toki et al., 2018) For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of BMFS, see BMFS1 (614675).
diamond-blackfan anemia 19
MedGen UID:
1683070
Concept ID:
C5193021
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50%, and growth deficiency in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia or no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
diamond-blackfan anemia 20
MedGen UID:
1674961
Concept ID:
C5193022
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50%, and growth deficiency in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia or no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 40
MedGen UID:
1714731
Concept ID:
C5394232
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-40 (COXPD40) is an autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder with onset in utero or soon after birth. Affected individuals have severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, poor growth, and sensorineural hearing loss. Laboratory studies show evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction, such as lactic acidosis. Patient-derived tissues and cells show variably decreased activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes I, III, IV, and V. The disorder is lethal, with no reported patients surviving past infancy (summary by Friederich et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 41
MedGen UID:
1711853
Concept ID:
C5394236
Disease or Syndrome
combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 42
MedGen UID:
1709379
Concept ID:
C5394237
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-42 (COXPD42) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by onset of cardiomyopathy, respiratory insufficiency, lactic metabolic acidosis, and anemia in the first months of life. Patient tissue shows variable impairment of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation affecting mtDNA-encoded subunits I, III, and IV. All reported affected infants have died in the first year of life (summary by Friederich et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
bone marrow failure syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
1717739
Concept ID:
C5394274
Disease or Syndrome
pseudo-torch syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1708513
Concept ID:
C5394391
Disease or Syndrome
Pseudo-TORCH syndrome-3 (PTORCH3) is an autosomal recessive disorder of immune dysregulation and neuroinflammation apparent from early infancy. Affected individuals have developmental delay with acute episodes of fever and multisystemic organ involvement, including coagulopathy, elevated liver enzymes, and proteinuria, often associated with thrombotic microangiopathy. Brain imaging shows progressive intracranial calcifications, white matter abnormalities, and sometimes cerebral or cerebellar atrophy. Laboratory studies show abnormal elevation of interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene (ISG) transcripts consistent with a type I interferonopathy. The phenotype resembles the sequelae of intrauterine infection, but there is usually no evidence of an infectious agent. The disorder results from defects in negative regulation of the interferon immunologic pathway. Death in early childhood is common (summary by Duncan et al., 2019 and Gruber et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PTORCH, see PTORCH1 (251290).
mitochondrial complex iv deficiency
MedGen UID:
1750917
Concept ID:
C5435656
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 1 (MC4DN1) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by rapidly progressive neurodegeneration and encephalopathy with loss of motor and cognitive skills between about 5 and 18 months of age after normal early development. Affected individuals show hypotonia, failure to thrive, loss of the ability to sit or walk, poor communication, and poor eye contact. Other features may include oculomotor abnormalities, including slow saccades, strabismus, ophthalmoplegia, and nystagmus, as well as deafness, apneic episodes, ataxia, tremor, and brisk tendon reflexes. Brain imaging shows bilateral symmetric lesions in the basal ganglia, consistent with a clinical diagnosis of Leigh syndrome (see 256000). Some patients may also have abnormalities in the brainstem and cerebellum. Laboratory studies usually show increased serum and CSF lactate and decreased levels and activity of mitochondrial respiratory complex IV in patient tissues. There is phenotypic variability, but death in childhood, often due to central respiratory failure, is common (summary by Tiranti et al., 1998; Tiranti et al., 1999; Teraoka et al., 1999; Poyau et al., 2000) Genetic Heterogeneity of Mitochondrial Complex IV Deficiency Most isolated COX deficiencies are inherited as autosomal recessive disorders caused by mutations in nuclear-encoded genes; mutations in the mtDNA-encoded COX subunit genes are relatively rare (Shoubridge, 2001; Sacconi et al., 2003). Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency caused by mutation in nuclear-encoded genes, in addition to MC4DN1, include MC4DN2 (604377), caused by mutation in the SCO2 gene (604272); MC4DN3 (619046), caused by mutation in the COX10 gene (602125); MC4DN4 (619048), caused by mutation in the SCO1 gene (603664); MC4DN5 (220111), caused by mutation in the LRPPRC gene (607544); MC4DN6 (615119), caused by mutation in the COX15 gene (603646); MC4DN7 (619051), caused by mutation in the COX6B1 gene (124089); MC4DN8 (619052), caused by mutation in the TACO1 gene (612958); MC4DN9 (616500), caused by mutation in the COA5 gene (613920); MC4DN10 (619053), caused by mutation in the COX14 gene (614478); MC4DN11 (619054), caused by mutation in the COX20 gene (614698); MC4DN12 (619055), caused by mutation in the PET100 gene (614770); MC4DN13 (616501), caused by mutation in the COA6 gene (614772); MC4DN14 (619058), caused by mutation in the COA3 gene (614775); MC4DN15 (619059), caused by mutation in the COX8A gene (123870); MC4DN16 (619060), caused by mutation in the COX4I1 gene (123864); MC4DN17 (619061), caused by mutation in the APOPT1 gene (616003); MC4DN18 (619062), caused by mutation in the COX6A2 gene (602009); MC4DN19 (619063), caused by mutation in the PET117 gene (614771); MC4DN20 (619064), caused by mutation in the COX5A gene (603773); and MC4DN21 (619065), caused by mutation in the COXFA4 gene (603883). Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency has been associated with mutations in several mitochondrial genes, including MTCO1 (516030), MTCO2 (516040), MTCO3 (516050), MTTS1 (590080), MTTL1 (590050), and MTTN (590010).
rajab interstitial lung disease with brain calcifications 1
MedGen UID:
1750003
Concept ID:
C5436276
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, inherited disorder characterized by widespread calcifications of basal ganglia and cortex, developmental delay, small stature, retinopathy and microcephaly. The absence of progressive deterioration of the neurological functions is characteristic of the disease.
immunodeficiency 69
MedGen UID:
1735911
Concept ID:
C5436498
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-69 (IMD69) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by increased susceptibility to disseminated mycobacterial infection, including after BCG (bacille Calmette-Guerin) vaccination. Affected individuals develop fever, hepatosplenomegaly, leukocytosis, and thrombocytosis during the acute infection. There appears to be normal immunologic function against other pathogens, including viruses and bacteria. Immunologic work-up shows normal parameters, but patient T and NK cells fail to produce gamma-interferon (IFNG) when stimulated in vitro (summary by Kerner et al., 2020). IMD69 is a form of mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) (see, e.g., IMD27A; 209950).
monosomy 7 myelodysplasia and leukemia syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1762901
Concept ID:
C5436668
Disease or Syndrome
Monosomy 7 myelodysplasia and leukemia syndrome-2 (M7MLS2) is an autosomal dominant hematologic disorder characterized by onset of pancytopenia, acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), and variable features of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) usually in the first decades of life. Bone marrow cells show monosomy 7. Germline mutations in the SAMD9 gene, located on chromosome 7q, have a gain-of-function suppressive effect on the cell cycle, resulting in decreased cellular proliferation. It is hypothesized that this germline defect leads to selective pressure favoring somatic loss of the chromosome 7 harboring the mutant allele (adaptation by aneuploidy) (summary by Wong et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of monosomy 7 myelodysplasia and leukemia syndrome, see 252270.
coach syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1755565
Concept ID:
C5436841
Disease or Syndrome
COACH syndrome is classically defined as Cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, Oligophrenia, Ataxia, Colobomas, and Hepatic fibrosis (Verloes and Lambotte, 1989). Brain MRI demonstrates the molar tooth sign, which is a feature of Joubert syndrome. The disorder has been described as a Joubert syndrome-related disorder with liver disease (summary by Doherty et al., 2010). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of COACH syndrome, see 216360.
amed syndrome, digenic
MedGen UID:
1754257
Concept ID:
C5436906
Disease or Syndrome
AMED syndrome (AMEDS) is an autosomal recessive digenic multisystem disorder characterized by global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development, onset of bone marrow failure and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in childhood, and poor overall growth with short stature (summary by Oka et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of bone marrow failure syndrome (BMFS), see BMFS1 (614675).
fanconi anemia, complementation group r
MedGen UID:
924579
Concept ID:
C4284093
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, isidor-toutain type
MedGen UID:
1684771
Concept ID:
C5231478
Disease or Syndrome
The Isidor-Toutain type of spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMDIST) is characterized by normal birth length, early postnatal growth deficiency, severe short stature, and genu varum. Skeletal radiographs show platyspondyly and severe epiphyseal and metaphyseal changes in the lower limbs (Le Caignec et al., 2019).

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Oh TK, Song KH, Song IA
BMC Infect Dis 2021 Jul 11;21(1):674. doi: 10.1186/s12879-021-06377-0. PMID: 34247585Free PMC Article
Katsumi A, Abe A, Tamura S, Matsushita T
Geriatr Gerontol Int 2021 Jul;21(7):549-554. Epub 2021 Jun 3 doi: 10.1111/ggi.14183. PMID: 34085375
Goto S, Turpie AGG, Farjat AE, Weitz JI, Haas S, Ageno W, Goldhaber SZ, Angchaisuksiri P, Kayani G, MacCallum P, Schellong S, Bounameaux H, Mantovani LG, Prandoni P, Kakkar AK; GARFIELD-VTE investigators.
Thromb Res 2021 Jul;203:155-162. Epub 2021 May 15 doi: 10.1016/j.thromres.2021.05.007. PMID: 34023735
Bailey A, Eisen I, Palmer A; Ottawa Arthroplasty Blood Preservation Group,., Beaulé PE, Fergusson DA, Grammatopoulos G
J Arthroplasty 2021 Jul;36(7):2281-2289. Epub 2021 Jan 19 doi: 10.1016/j.arth.2021.01.018. PMID: 33549420
Hernandez-Morgan M, Neelankavil J, Grogan T, Hong B, Wingert T, Methangkool E
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 2021 Aug;35(8):2311-2318. Epub 2020 Oct 28 doi: 10.1053/j.jvca.2020.10.045. PMID: 33293217

Diagnosis

Foteinogiannopoulou K, Karmiris K, Axiaris G, Velegraki M, Gklavas A, Kapizioni C, Karageorgos C, Kateri C, Katsoula A, Kokkotis G, Koureta E, Lamouri C, Markopoulos P, Palatianou M, Pastras P, Fasoulas K, Giouleme O, Zampeli E, Theodoropoulou A, Theocharis G, Thomopoulos K, Karatzas P, Katsanos KH, Kapsoritakis A, Kourikou A, Mathou N, Manolakopoulos S, Michalopoulos G, Michopoulos S, Boubonaris A, Bamias G, Papadopoulos V, Papatheodoridis G, Papaconstantinou I, Pachiadakis I, Soufleris K, Tzouvala M, Triantos C, Tsironi E, Christodoulou DK, Koutroubakis IE; Hellenic group for the study of IBD.
BMC Gastroenterol 2021 Jun 29;21(1):269. doi: 10.1186/s12876-021-01826-1. PMID: 34187376Free PMC Article
Goto S, Turpie AGG, Farjat AE, Weitz JI, Haas S, Ageno W, Goldhaber SZ, Angchaisuksiri P, Kayani G, MacCallum P, Schellong S, Bounameaux H, Mantovani LG, Prandoni P, Kakkar AK; GARFIELD-VTE investigators.
Thromb Res 2021 Jul;203:155-162. Epub 2021 May 15 doi: 10.1016/j.thromres.2021.05.007. PMID: 34023735
Babitt JL, Eisenga MF, Haase VH, Kshirsagar AV, Levin A, Locatelli F, Małyszko J, Swinkels DW, Tarng DC, Cheung M, Jadoul M, Winkelmayer WC, Drüeke TB; Conference Participants.
Kidney Int 2021 Jun;99(6):1280-1295. Epub 2021 Apr 8 doi: 10.1016/j.kint.2021.03.020. PMID: 33839163
Hernandez-Morgan M, Neelankavil J, Grogan T, Hong B, Wingert T, Methangkool E
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 2021 Aug;35(8):2311-2318. Epub 2020 Oct 28 doi: 10.1053/j.jvca.2020.10.045. PMID: 33293217
Zopfs D, Rinneburger M, Pinto Dos Santos D, Reimer RP, Laukamp KR, Maintz D, Lennartz S, Große Hokamp N
Eur Radiol 2021 Jun;31(6):4350-4357. Epub 2020 Nov 25 doi: 10.1007/s00330-020-07497-y. PMID: 33241515Free PMC Article

Therapy

Seiler F, Ahlgrim C, Birkner P, Wrobel N, Rilinger J, Grundmann S, Bode C, Pottgiesser T
J Cardiothorac Surg 2021 Jun 2;16(1):159. doi: 10.1186/s13019-021-01510-1. PMID: 34078389Free PMC Article
Goto S, Turpie AGG, Farjat AE, Weitz JI, Haas S, Ageno W, Goldhaber SZ, Angchaisuksiri P, Kayani G, MacCallum P, Schellong S, Bounameaux H, Mantovani LG, Prandoni P, Kakkar AK; GARFIELD-VTE investigators.
Thromb Res 2021 Jul;203:155-162. Epub 2021 May 15 doi: 10.1016/j.thromres.2021.05.007. PMID: 34023735
Babitt JL, Eisenga MF, Haase VH, Kshirsagar AV, Levin A, Locatelli F, Małyszko J, Swinkels DW, Tarng DC, Cheung M, Jadoul M, Winkelmayer WC, Drüeke TB; Conference Participants.
Kidney Int 2021 Jun;99(6):1280-1295. Epub 2021 Apr 8 doi: 10.1016/j.kint.2021.03.020. PMID: 33839163
Muleta A, Hailu D, Belachew T
Nutrition 2021 Jun;86:111170. Epub 2021 Jan 23 doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2021.111170. PMID: 33601123
Hernandez-Morgan M, Neelankavil J, Grogan T, Hong B, Wingert T, Methangkool E
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 2021 Aug;35(8):2311-2318. Epub 2020 Oct 28 doi: 10.1053/j.jvca.2020.10.045. PMID: 33293217

Prognosis

Oh TK, Song KH, Song IA
BMC Infect Dis 2021 Jul 11;21(1):674. doi: 10.1186/s12879-021-06377-0. PMID: 34247585Free PMC Article
Nguyen Q, Meng E, Berube J, Bergstrom R, Lam W
J Cardiothorac Surg 2021 Apr 23;16(1):109. doi: 10.1186/s13019-021-01493-z. PMID: 33892775Free PMC Article
Ito K, Yokota S, Watanabe M, Inoue Y, Takahashi K, Himuro N, Yasuno T, Miyake K, Uesugi N, Masutani K, Nakashima H
Intern Med 2021 May 1;60(9):1349-1357. Epub 2020 Nov 30 doi: 10.2169/internalmedicine.5455-20. PMID: 33250462Free PMC Article
Gu A, Chen AZ, Selemon NA, Tornberg H, Wei C, Fassihi SC, Campbell JC, Sculco PK
J Arthroplasty 2021 May;36(5):1719-1728. Epub 2020 Nov 7 doi: 10.1016/j.arth.2020.10.061. PMID: 33248920
Zopfs D, Rinneburger M, Pinto Dos Santos D, Reimer RP, Laukamp KR, Maintz D, Lennartz S, Große Hokamp N
Eur Radiol 2021 Jun;31(6):4350-4357. Epub 2020 Nov 25 doi: 10.1007/s00330-020-07497-y. PMID: 33241515Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Oh TK, Song KH, Song IA
BMC Infect Dis 2021 Jul 11;21(1):674. doi: 10.1186/s12879-021-06377-0. PMID: 34247585Free PMC Article
Foteinogiannopoulou K, Karmiris K, Axiaris G, Velegraki M, Gklavas A, Kapizioni C, Karageorgos C, Kateri C, Katsoula A, Kokkotis G, Koureta E, Lamouri C, Markopoulos P, Palatianou M, Pastras P, Fasoulas K, Giouleme O, Zampeli E, Theodoropoulou A, Theocharis G, Thomopoulos K, Karatzas P, Katsanos KH, Kapsoritakis A, Kourikou A, Mathou N, Manolakopoulos S, Michalopoulos G, Michopoulos S, Boubonaris A, Bamias G, Papadopoulos V, Papatheodoridis G, Papaconstantinou I, Pachiadakis I, Soufleris K, Tzouvala M, Triantos C, Tsironi E, Christodoulou DK, Koutroubakis IE; Hellenic group for the study of IBD.
BMC Gastroenterol 2021 Jun 29;21(1):269. doi: 10.1186/s12876-021-01826-1. PMID: 34187376Free PMC Article
Seiler F, Ahlgrim C, Birkner P, Wrobel N, Rilinger J, Grundmann S, Bode C, Pottgiesser T
J Cardiothorac Surg 2021 Jun 2;16(1):159. doi: 10.1186/s13019-021-01510-1. PMID: 34078389Free PMC Article
Muleta A, Hailu D, Belachew T
Nutrition 2021 Jun;86:111170. Epub 2021 Jan 23 doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2021.111170. PMID: 33601123
Zopfs D, Rinneburger M, Pinto Dos Santos D, Reimer RP, Laukamp KR, Maintz D, Lennartz S, Große Hokamp N
Eur Radiol 2021 Jun;31(6):4350-4357. Epub 2020 Nov 25 doi: 10.1007/s00330-020-07497-y. PMID: 33241515Free PMC Article

Recent systematic reviews

Wang H, Huang K, Wang C, Chen C, Fang H, Cao J
Ann Palliat Med 2021 Apr;10(4):4736-4746. doi: 10.21037/apm-21-456. PMID: 33966423
Abu-Zaid A, Alomar O, Abuzaid M, Baradwan S, Salem H, Al-Badawi IA
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 2021 Mar;258:382-390. Epub 2021 Jan 27 doi: 10.1016/j.ejogrb.2021.01.038. PMID: 33529973
Gelaw Y, Getaneh Z, Melku M
Environ Health Prev Med 2021 Jan 23;26(1):13. doi: 10.1186/s12199-020-00931-z. PMID: 33485299Free PMC Article
Cotter J, Baldaia C, Ferreira M, Macedo G, Pedroto I
World J Gastroenterol 2020 Dec 7;26(45):7242-7257. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v26.i45.7242. PMID: 33362380Free PMC Article
Xu Y, Hu T, Ding H, Chen R
Expert Rev Respir Med 2020 Dec;14(12):1267-1277. Epub 2020 Sep 24 doi: 10.1080/17476348.2020.1816468. PMID: 32869670

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