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Items: 1 to 20 of 334

1.

Obesity

MedGen UID:
18127
Concept ID:
C0028754
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Obesity

MedGen UID:
368429
Concept ID:
C1963185
Finding
3.

Prader-Willi syndrome

Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by severe hypotonia and feeding difficulties in early infancy, followed in later infancy or early childhood by excessive eating and gradual development of morbid obesity (unless eating is externally controlled). Motor milestones and language development are delayed. All individuals have some degree of cognitive impairment. A distinctive behavioral phenotype (with temper tantrums, stubbornness, manipulative behavior, and obsessive-compulsive characteristics) is common. Hypogonadism is present in both males and females and manifests as genital hypoplasia, incomplete pubertal development, and, in most, infertility. Short stature is common (if not treated with growth hormone); characteristic facial features, strabismus, and scoliosis are often present. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
46057
Concept ID:
C0032897
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Body mass index quantitative trait locus 9

MedGen UID:
393673
Concept ID:
C2677162
Finding
5.

Body mass index quantitative trait locus 4

MedGen UID:
375313
Concept ID:
C1843898
Finding
6.

Leptin deficiency or dysfunction

Congenital leptin deficiency is a condition that causes severe obesity beginning in the first few months of life. Affected individuals are of normal weight at birth, but they are constantly hungry and quickly gain weight. Without treatment, the extreme hunger continues and leads to chronic excessive eating (hyperphagia) and obesity. Beginning in early childhood, affected individuals develop abnormal eating behaviors such as fighting with other children over food, hoarding food, and eating in secret.People with congenital leptin deficiency also have hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, which is a condition caused by reduced production of hormones that direct sexual development. Without treatment, affected individuals experience delayed puberty or do not go through puberty, and may be unable to conceive children (infertile). [from GHR]

MedGen UID:
767138
Concept ID:
C3554224
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Truncal obesity

MedGen UID:
90229
Concept ID:
C0311277
Finding
8.

Body mass index quantitative trait locus 12

MedGen UID:
436703
Concept ID:
C2676498
Finding
9.

Proopiomelanocortin deficiency

Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) deficiency is characterized by severe, early-onset hyperphagic obesity and congenital adrenal insufficiency, the latter secondary to corticotropin (ACTH) deficiency. In the first months of life most children with POMC deficiency experience exponential weight gain, hyperphagia, cholestasis, and adrenal insufficiency. Weight gain continues rapidly, so that by the end of the first year of life obesity is severe (i.e., weight well above the 98th centile for age, without increased height). Red hair and Fitzpatrick type 1 skin (which always burns and never tans) are common, but not invariably present. On occasion central hypothyroidism (resulting from thyroid stimulating hormone [TSH] deficiency), adolescent-onset growth hormone (GH) deficiency, and adolescent-onset hypogonadotropic hypogonadism resulting from deficiency of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicule stimulating hormone (FSH) can be observed. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
341863
Concept ID:
C1857854
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Maternal Obesity

Obesity in a female who has a child. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
473282
Concept ID:
C0746977
Finding
11.

Polygenic Obesity

Obesity associated with variations in multiple genes. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
882417
Concept ID:
C4054170
Finding
12.

Iatrogenic Obesity

Obesity resulting from medical treatment or intervention. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
888153
Concept ID:
C4054748
Finding
13.

Obesity, Visceral

Obesity due to excessive deposition of INTRA-ABDOMINAL FAT in the abdominal VISCERA and OMENTUM. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
423468
Concept ID:
C2936179
Sign or Symptom
14.

Exogenous obesity

Obesity caused by caloric intake greater than caloric expenditures. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
704385
Concept ID:
C1281429
Finding
15.

Monogenic Obesity

Obesity associated with an identifiable mutation in a single gene. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
885912
Concept ID:
C4054476
Sign or Symptom
16.

Leptin receptor deficiency

Leptin receptor deficiency is a condition that causes severe obesity beginning in the first few months of life. Affected individuals are of normal weight at birth, but they are constantly hungry and quickly gain weight. The extreme hunger leads to chronic excessive eating (hyperphagia) and obesity. Beginning in early childhood, affected individuals develop abnormal eating behaviors such as fighting with other children over food, hoarding food, and eating in secret.People with leptin receptor deficiency also have hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, which is a condition caused by reduced production of hormones that direct sexual development. Affected individuals experience delayed puberty or do not go through puberty, and they may be unable to conceive children (infertile). [from GHR]

MedGen UID:
767139
Concept ID:
C3554225
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Body mass index quantitative trait locus 18

MedGen UID:
811515
Concept ID:
C3714940
Finding
18.

Body mass index quantitative trait locus 11

MedGen UID:
394752
Concept ID:
C2678155
Finding
19.

Abdominal obesity

MedGen UID:
776831
Concept ID:
CN185447
Finding
20.

Metabolic syndrome X

A clustering of abdominal obesity, high triglycerides, low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), high blood pressure, and elevated fasting glucose levels is sometimes called metabolic syndrome X (Reaven, 1988) or abdominal obesity-metabolic syndrome (Bjorntorp, 1991). The syndrome may affect nearly 1 in 4 U.S. adults and is considered a veritable epidemic (Ford et al., 2002). It is a major risk factor for both diabetes mellitus (see 125853 and Haffner et al., 1992) and cardiovascular disease (Isomaa et al., 2001). The etiology is complex, determined by the interplay of both genetic and environmental factors. The prevalence varies substantially among ethnic groups, with the highest rates in Mexican American women (Park et al., 2003). Other factors influencing the metabolic syndrome include age, smoking, alcohol, diet, and physical inactivity. Genetic Heterogeneity of Abdominal Obesity-Metabolic Syndrome AOMS2 (605572) has been mapped to chromosome 17p12. AOMS3 (615812) is caused by mutation in the DYRK1B gene (604556) on chromosome 19q13. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
99356
Concept ID:
C0524620
Disease or Syndrome
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