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1.

Neurodegeneration

Loss of functional activity and trophic degeneration of nerve axons and their terminal arborizations following the destruction of their cells of origin or interruption of their continuity with these cells. The pathology is characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases. Often the process of nerve degeneration is studied in research on neuroanatomical localization and correlation of the neurophysiology of neural pathways. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
17999
Concept ID:
C0027746
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
2.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 1

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease involving both upper motor neurons (UMN) and lower motor neurons (LMN). UMN signs include hyperreflexia, extensor plantar response, increased muscle tone, and weakness in a topographic representation. LMN signs include weakness, muscle wasting, hyporeflexia, muscle cramps, and fasciculations. Initial presentation varies. Affected individuals typically present with either asymmetric focal weakness of the extremities (stumbling or poor handgrip) or bulbar findings (dysarthria, dysphagia). Other findings may include muscle fasciculations, muscle cramps, and labile affect, but not necessarily mood. Regardless of initial symptoms, atrophy and weakness eventually affect other muscles. The mean age of onset is 56 years in individuals with no known family history and 46 years in individuals with more than one affected family member (familial ALS or FALS). Average disease duration is about three years, but it can vary significantly. Death usually results from compromise of the respiratory muscles. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
400169
Concept ID:
C1862939
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Leigh syndrome

Leigh syndrome is an early-onset progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a characteristic neuropathology consisting of focal, bilateral lesions in one or more areas of the central nervous system, including the brainstem, thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The lesions are areas of demyelination, gliosis, necrosis, spongiosis, or capillary proliferation. Clinical symptoms depend on which areas of the central nervous system are involved. The most common underlying cause is a defect in oxidative phosphorylation (Dahl, 1998). Leigh syndrome may be a feature of a deficiency of any of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes: complex I deficiency (252010), complex II deficiency (252011), complex III deficiency (124000), complex IV deficiency (cytochrome c oxidase; 220110), or complex V deficiency (604273). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
44095
Concept ID:
C0023264
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Tay-Sachs disease

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
11713
Concept ID:
C0039373
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Frontotemporal dementia

The clinical manifestations of MAPT-related disorders (MAPT-related tauopathies) are most typically those of frontotemporal dementia (FTDP-17), but also include progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), mild late-onset parkinsonism, and dementia with epilepsy. Clinical presentation of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is variable: some present with slowly progressive behavioral changes, language disturbances, and/or extrapyramidal signs, whereas others present with rigidity, bradykinesia, supranuclear palsy, and saccadic eye movement disorders. Onset is usually between ages 40 and 60 years, but may be earlier or later. The disease progresses over a few years into profound dementia with mutism. PSP is characterized by progressive vertical gaze palsy in combination with a prominent loss of balance at early stages of the disease. With progression, axial rigidity, dysarthria, and dysphagia become prominent, often in combination with a frontal dysexecutive syndrome. CBD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder which affects both the frontoparietal cortex and the basal ganglia, resulting in a mild to moderate dementia in combination with asymmetric parkinsonism, ideomotor apraxia, aphasia, and an alien-hand syndrome. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
83266
Concept ID:
C0338451
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of inherited, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorders characterized by progressive intellectual and motor deterioration, seizures, and early death. Visual loss is a feature of most forms. Clinical phenotypes have been characterized traditionally according to the age of onset and order of appearance of clinical features into infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adult, and Northern epilepsy (also known as progressive epilepsy with mental retardation [EPMR]). There is however genetic and allelic heterogeneity; a proposed new nomenclature and classification system has been developed to take into account both the responsible gene and the age at disease onset; for example, CLN1 disease, infantile onset and CLN1 disease, juvenile onset are both caused by pathogenic variants in PPT1 but with differing age of onset. The most prevalent NCLs are CLN3 disease, classic juvenile and CLN2 disease, classic late infantile (although prevalence varies by ethnicity and country of family origin): CLN2 disease, classic late infantile. The first symptoms typically appear between age two and four years, usually starting with epilepsy, followed by regression of developmental milestones, myoclonic ataxia, and pyramidal signs. Visual impairment typically appears at age four to six years and rapidly progresses to light /dark awareness only. Life expectancy ranges from age six years to early teenage. CLN3 disease, classic juvenile. Onset is usually between ages four and ten years. Rapidly progressing visual loss resulting in severe visual impairment within one to two years is often the first clinical sign. Epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures and/or complex-partial seizures typically appears around age ten years. Life expectancy ranges from the late teens to the 30s. Other forms of NCL may present with behavior changes, epilepsy, visual impairment, or slowing of developmental progress and then loss of skills. The course may be extremely variable. Some genotype-phenotype information is available. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
155549
Concept ID:
C0751383
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Beta-D-mannosidosis

Beta-mannosidosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease of glycoprotein catabolism caused by a deficiency of lysosomal beta-mannosidase activity. The most severely affected patients show developmental delay and mental retardation, but there are differing levels of severity and some patients may have comparatively mild disease (Bedilu et al., 2002) The disorder was first described in goats (Jones and Dawson, 1981), who have a more severe neurodegenerative disorder than that seen in humans. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
87462
Concept ID:
C0342849
8.

Diabetes mellitus AND insipidus with optic atrophy AND deafness

WFS1-related disorders range from Wolfram syndrome (WFS) to WFS1-related low-frequency sensory hearing loss (also known as DFNA6/14/38 low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss [LFSNHL]). WFS is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy before age 16 years, and typically associated with sensorineural hearing loss, progressive neurologic abnormalities (cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, dementia, psychiatric illness, and urinary tract atony), and other endocrine abnormalities. Median age at death is 30 years. WFS-like disease is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, diabetes mellitus, psychiatric illness, and variable optic atrophy. WFS1-related LFSNHL is characterized by congenital, nonsyndromic, slowly progressive, low-frequency (<2000 Hz) sensorineural hearing loss. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
21923
Concept ID:
C0043207
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Unverricht-Lundborg syndrome

Unverricht-Lundborg disease (EPM1) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset from age six to 15 years, stimulus-sensitive myoclonus, and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures. Some years after the onset, ataxia, incoordination, intentional tremor, and dysarthria develop. Individuals with EPM1 are mentally alert but show emotional lability, depression, and mild decline in intellectual performance over time. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
155923
Concept ID:
C0751785
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 2A

TSEN54-related pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) includes three PCH types (PCH2, 4, and 5) that share characteristic neuroradiologic and neurologic findings. The three types (which differ mainly in life expectancy) were thought to be distinct entities before their molecular basis was known. Children with PCH2 usually succumb before age ten years, whereas those with PCH4 and 5 usually succumb as neonates. Children with PCH2 have generalized clonus, incoordination of sucking and swallowing, impaired motor and cognitive development with lack of voluntary motor development, central visual impairment, and an increased risk for rhabdomyolysis complicating severe infections. Epilepsy is present in approximately 50%. Neonates with PCH4 often have seizures, multiple joint contractures (''arthrogryposis''), generalized clonus, and central respiratory impairment. PCH5, which resembles PCH4, has been described in one family. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
376379
Concept ID:
C1848526
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Mitochondrial complex I deficiency

Isolated complex I deficiency is the most common enzymatic defect of the oxidative phosphorylation disorders (McFarland et al., 2004; Kirby et al., 2004). It causes a wide range of clinical disorders, ranging from lethal neonatal disease to adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders. Phenotypes include macrocephaly with progressive leukodystrophy, nonspecific encephalopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myopathy, liver disease, Leigh syndrome (256000), Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (535000), and some forms of Parkinson disease (see 556500) (Loeffen et al., 2000; Pitkanen et al., 1996; Robinson, 1998). Genetic Heterogeneity of Complex I Deficiency Mitochondrial complex I deficiency shows extreme genetic heterogeneity and can be caused by mutation in nuclear-encoded genes or in mitochondrial-encoded genes. There are no obvious genotype-phenotype correlations, and inference of the underlying basis from the clinical or biochemical presentation is difficult, if not impossible (summary by Haack et al., 2012). However, the majority of cases are caused by mutations in nuclear-encoded genes (Loeffen et al., 2000; Triepels et al., 2001). Complex I deficiency with autosomal recessive inheritance results from mutation in nuclear-encoded subunit genes, including NDUFV1 (161015), NDUFV2 (600532), NDUFS1 (157655), NDUFS2 (602985), NDUFS3 (603846), NDUFS4 (602694), NDUFS6 (603848), NDUFS7 (601825), NDUFS8 (602141), NDUFA2 (602137), NDUFA11 (612638), NDUFAF3 (612911), NDUFA10 (603835), NDUFB3 (603839), NDUFB9 (601445), and the complex I assembly genes B17.2L (609653), HRPAP20 (611776), C20ORF7 (612360), NUBPL (613621), NDUFAF1 (606934), TMEM126B (615533), TIMMDC1 (615534), and NDUFA13 (609435). The disorder can also be caused by mutation in other nuclear-encoded genes, including FOXRED1 (613622), ACAD9 (611103; see 611126), and MTFMT (611766; see 256000). X-linked inheritance is observed with mutations in the NDUFA1 (300078) and NDUFB11 (300403) genes. Complex I deficiency with mitochondrial inheritance has been associated with mutation in 6 mitochondrial-encoded components of complex I: MTND1 (516000), MTND2 (516001), MTND3 (516002), MTND4 (516003), MTND5 (516005), MTND6 (516006). Most of these patients have a phenotype of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON; 535000) or Leigh syndrome (256000). Features of complex I deficiency may also be caused by mutation in other mitochondrial genes, including MTTS2 (590085). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
374101
Concept ID:
C1838979
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and/or frontotemporal dementia 1

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by adult onset of one or both of these features in an affected individual, with significant intrafamilial variation. The disorder is genetically and pathologically heterogeneous (summary by Vance et al., 2006). Patients with C9ORF72 repeat expansions tend to show a lower age of onset, shorter survival, bulbar symptom onset, increased incidence of neurodegenerative disease in relatives, and a propensity toward psychosis or hallucinations compared to patients with other forms of ALS and/or FTD (summary by Harms et al., 2013). Patients with C9ORF72 repeat expansions also show psychiatric disturbances that may predate the onset of dementia (Meisler et al., 2013; Gomez-Tortosa et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description of frontotemporal dementia, also known as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), see 600274. For a general discussion of motor neuron disease (MND), see amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-1 (ALS1; 105400). Genetic Heterogeneity of Frontotemporal Dementia and/or Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis See also FTDALS2 (615911), caused by mutation in the CHCHD10 gene (615903) on chromosome 22q11; FTDALS3 (616437), caused by mutation in the SQSTM1 gene (601530) on chromosome 5q35; and FTDALS4 (616439), caused by mutation in the TBK1 gene (604834) on chromosome 12q14. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
350795
Concept ID:
C1862937
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Severe neurodegenerative course resulting in a comatose state or death

MedGen UID:
815100
Concept ID:
C3808770
Finding
14.

Ceroid lipofuscinosis neuronal 1

The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of inherited, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorders characterized by progressive intellectual and motor deterioration, seizures, and early death. Visual loss is a feature of most forms. Clinical phenotypes have been characterized traditionally according to the age of onset and order of appearance of clinical features into infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adult, and Northern epilepsy (also known as progressive epilepsy with mental retardation [EPMR]). There is however genetic and allelic heterogeneity; a proposed new nomenclature and classification system has been developed to take into account both the responsible gene and the age at disease onset; for example, CLN1 disease, infantile onset and CLN1 disease, juvenile onset are both caused by pathogenic variants in PPT1 but with differing age of onset. The most prevalent NCLs are CLN3 disease, classic juvenile and CLN2 disease, classic late infantile (although prevalence varies by ethnicity and country of family origin): CLN2 disease, classic late infantile. The first symptoms typically appear between age two and four years, usually starting with epilepsy, followed by regression of developmental milestones, myoclonic ataxia, and pyramidal signs. Visual impairment typically appears at age four to six years and rapidly progresses to light /dark awareness only. Life expectancy ranges from age six years to early teenage. CLN3 disease, classic juvenile. Onset is usually between ages four and ten years. Rapidly progressing visual loss resulting in severe visual impairment within one to two years is often the first clinical sign. Epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures and/or complex-partial seizures typically appears around age ten years. Life expectancy ranges from the late teens to the 30s. Other forms of NCL may present with behavior changes, epilepsy, visual impairment, or slowing of developmental progress and then loss of skills. The course may be extremely variable. Some genotype-phenotype information is available. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
340540
Concept ID:
C1850451
Disease or Syndrome
15.
16.

Sandhoff disease

Sandhoff disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by an accumulation of GM2 gangliosides, particularly in neurons, and is clinically indistinguishable from Tay-Sachs disease (272800). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
11313
Concept ID:
C0036161
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Ceroid lipofuscinosis neuronal 2

The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of inherited, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorders characterized by progressive intellectual and motor deterioration, seizures, and early death. Visual loss is a feature of most forms. Clinical phenotypes have been characterized traditionally according to the age of onset and order of appearance of clinical features into infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adult, and Northern epilepsy (also known as progressive epilepsy with mental retardation [EPMR]). There is however genetic and allelic heterogeneity; a proposed new nomenclature and classification system has been developed to take into account both the responsible gene and the age at disease onset; for example, CLN1 disease, infantile onset and CLN1 disease, juvenile onset are both caused by pathogenic variants in PPT1 but with differing age of onset. The most prevalent NCLs are CLN3 disease, classic juvenile and CLN2 disease, classic late infantile (although prevalence varies by ethnicity and country of family origin): CLN2 disease, classic late infantile. The first symptoms typically appear between age two and four years, usually starting with epilepsy, followed by regression of developmental milestones, myoclonic ataxia, and pyramidal signs. Visual impairment typically appears at age four to six years and rapidly progresses to light /dark awareness only. Life expectancy ranges from age six years to early teenage. CLN3 disease, classic juvenile. Onset is usually between ages four and ten years. Rapidly progressing visual loss resulting in severe visual impairment within one to two years is often the first clinical sign. Epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures and/or complex-partial seizures typically appears around age ten years. Life expectancy ranges from the late teens to the 30s. Other forms of NCL may present with behavior changes, epilepsy, visual impairment, or slowing of developmental progress and then loss of skills. The course may be extremely variable. Some genotype-phenotype information is available. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
406281
Concept ID:
C1876161
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Ceroid lipofuscinosis neuronal 5

The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of inherited, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorders characterized by progressive intellectual and motor deterioration, seizures, and early death. Visual loss is a feature of most forms. Clinical phenotypes have been characterized traditionally according to the age of onset and order of appearance of clinical features into infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adult, and Northern epilepsy (also known as progressive epilepsy with mental retardation [EPMR]). There is however genetic and allelic heterogeneity; a proposed new nomenclature and classification system has been developed to take into account both the responsible gene and the age at disease onset; for example, CLN1 disease, infantile onset and CLN1 disease, juvenile onset are both caused by pathogenic variants in PPT1 but with differing age of onset. The most prevalent NCLs are CLN3 disease, classic juvenile and CLN2 disease, classic late infantile (although prevalence varies by ethnicity and country of family origin): CLN2 disease, classic late infantile. The first symptoms typically appear between age two and four years, usually starting with epilepsy, followed by regression of developmental milestones, myoclonic ataxia, and pyramidal signs. Visual impairment typically appears at age four to six years and rapidly progresses to light /dark awareness only. Life expectancy ranges from age six years to early teenage. CLN3 disease, classic juvenile. Onset is usually between ages four and ten years. Rapidly progressing visual loss resulting in severe visual impairment within one to two years is often the first clinical sign. Epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures and/or complex-partial seizures typically appears around age ten years. Life expectancy ranges from the late teens to the 30s. Other forms of NCL may present with behavior changes, epilepsy, visual impairment, or slowing of developmental progress and then loss of skills. The course may be extremely variable. Some genotype-phenotype information is available. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
376792
Concept ID:
C1850442
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 6

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease involving both upper motor neurons (UMN) and lower motor neurons (LMN). UMN signs include hyperreflexia, extensor plantar response, increased muscle tone, and weakness in a topographic representation. LMN signs include weakness, muscle wasting, hyporeflexia, muscle cramps, and fasciculations. Initial presentation varies. Affected individuals typically present with either asymmetric focal weakness of the extremities (stumbling or poor handgrip) or bulbar findings (dysarthria, dysphagia). Other findings may include muscle fasciculations, muscle cramps, and labile affect, but not necessarily mood. Regardless of initial symptoms, atrophy and weakness eventually affect other muscles. The mean age of onset is 56 years in individuals with no known family history and 46 years in individuals with more than one affected family member (familial ALS or FALS). Average disease duration is about three years, but it can vary significantly. Death usually results from compromise of the respiratory muscles. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
374989
Concept ID:
C1842675
Disease or Syndrome
20.

WFS1-Related Disorders

WFS1-related disorders range from Wolfram syndrome (WFS) to WFS1-related low-frequency sensory hearing loss (also known as DFNA6/14/38 low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss [LFSNHL]). WFS is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy before age 16 years, and typically associated with sensorineural hearing loss, progressive neurologic abnormalities (cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, dementia, psychiatric illness, and urinary tract atony), and other endocrine abnormalities. Median age at death is 30 years. WFS-like disease is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, diabetes mellitus, psychiatric illness, and variable optic atrophy. WFS1-related LFSNHL is characterized by congenital, nonsyndromic, slowly progressive, low-frequency (<2000 Hz) sensorineural hearing loss. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
331419
Concept ID:
C1833021
Disease or Syndrome
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