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1.

Diabetes

MedGen UID:
902307
Concept ID:
C0011847
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Diabetes mellitus AND insipidus with optic atrophy AND deafness

WFS1-related disorders range from Wolfram syndrome (WFS) to WFS1-related low-frequency sensory hearing loss (also known as DFNA6/14/38 low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss [LFSNHL]). WFS is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy before age 16 years, and typically associated with sensorineural hearing loss, progressive neurologic abnormalities (cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, dementia, psychiatric illness, and urinary tract atony), and other endocrine abnormalities. Median age at death is 30 years. WFS-like disease is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, diabetes mellitus, psychiatric illness, and variable optic atrophy. WFS1-related LFSNHL is characterized by congenital, nonsyndromic, slowly progressive, low-frequency (<2000 Hz) sensorineural hearing loss. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
21923
Concept ID:
C0043207
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Diabetes mellitus type 2

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. Having prediabetes also increases your risk. Prediabetes means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes appear slowly. Some people do not notice symptoms at all. The symptoms can include. -Being very thirsty. -Urinating often. -Feeling very hungry or tired. -Losing weight without trying. -Having sores that heal slowly. -Having blurry eyesight. Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Many people can manage their diabetes through healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing. Some people also need to take diabetes medicines. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
41523
Concept ID:
C0011860
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Microvascular complications of diabetes 1

MedGen UID:
382957
Concept ID:
C2676832
Finding
5.

Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus

Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) is characterized by the onset of hyperglycemia within the first six months of life (mean age: 7 weeks; range: birth to 26 weeks). The diabetes mellitus is associated with partial or complete insulin deficiency. Clinical manifestations at the time of diagnosis include intrauterine growth retardation, hyperglycemia, glycosuria, osmotic polyuria, severe dehydration, and failure to thrive. Therapy with insulin corrects the hyperglycemia and results in dramatic catch-up growth. The course of PNDM varies by genotype. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
371484
Concept ID:
C1833104
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Familial partial lipodystrophy 2

Familial partial lipodystrophy is a metabolic disorder characterized by abnormal subcutaneous adipose tissue distribution beginning in late childhood or early adult life. Affected individuals gradually lose fat from the upper and lower extremities and the gluteal and truncal regions, resulting in a muscular appearance with prominent superficial veins. In some patients, adipose tissue accumulates on the face and neck, causing a double chin, fat neck, or cushingoid appearance. Metabolic abnormalities include insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus with acanthosis nigricans and hypertriglyceridemia; hirsutism and menstrual abnormalities occur infrequently. Familial partial lipodystrophy may also be referred to as lipoatrophic diabetes mellitus, but the essential feature is loss of subcutaneous fat (review by Garg, 2004). The disorder may be misdiagnosed as Cushing disease (see 219080) (Kobberling and Dunnigan, 1986; Garg, 2004). Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Partial Lipodystrophy Familial partial lipodystrophy is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Types 1 and 2 were originally described as clinical subtypes: type 1 (FPLD1; 608600), characterized by loss of subcutaneous fat confined to the limbs (Kobberling et al., 1975), and FPLD2, characterized by loss of subcutaneous fat from the limbs and trunk (Dunnigan et al., 1974; Kobberling and Dunnigan, 1986). No genetic basis for FPLD1 has yet been delineated. FPLD3 (604367) is caused by mutation in the PPARG gene (601487) on chromosome 3p25; FPLD4 (613877) is caused by mutation in the PLIN1 gene (170290) on chromosome 15q26; FPLD5 (615238) is caused by mutation in the CIDEC gene (612120) on chromosome 3p25; and FPLD6 (615980) is caused by mutation in the LIPe gene (151750) on chromosome 19q13. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
354526
Concept ID:
C1720860
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 2

MODY is a form of NIDDM (125853) characterized by monogenic autosomal dominant transmission and early age of onset. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of MODY, see 606391. In a review of the various forms of MODY, Fajans et al. (2001) stated that glucokinase-related MODY2 is a common form of the disorder, especially in children with mild hyperglycemia and in women with gestational diabetes and a family history of diabetes. It has been described in persons of all racial and ethnic groups. More than 130 MODY-associated mutations have been found in the glucokinase gene. Heterozygous mutations in glucokinase are associated with a mild form of nonprogressive hyperglycemia that is usually asymptomatic at diagnosis and is treated with diet alone. The mild fasting hyperglycemia with blood glucose concentrations of 110 to 145 mg/deciliter and impaired glucose tolerance in most affected carriers may be recognized by biochemical testing at a young age, possibly as early as birth. About 50% of the women who are carriers may have gestational diabetes. Less than 50% of the carriers have overt diabetes; many of those who do are obese or elderly. Two percent of MODY2 patients require insulin therapy. Diabetes-associated complications are rare in this form of MODY. MODY was found in 13% of the Caucasian NIDDM families collected in France by Froguel et al. (1991). Gidh-Jain et al. (1993) found that GCK mutations accounted for 56% of MODY families in France. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
330729
Concept ID:
C1841962
8.

Familial hypoplastic, glomerulocystic kidney

The 17q12 recurrent deletion syndrome is characterized by variable combinations of the three following findings: structural or functional abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract, maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5 (MODY5), and neurodevelopmental or neuropsychiatric disorders (e.g., global developmental delay, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, anxiety, and bipolar disorder). Using a method of data analysis that avoids ascertainment bias, the authors determined that multicystic kidneys and other structural renal anomalies occur in 80% to 85% of affected individuals, MODY5 in approximately 40%, and some degree of developmental delay or learning disability in approximately 50%. MODY5 is most often diagnosed before age 25 years (range: 10 to 50 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
96569
Concept ID:
C0431693
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Diabetes mellitus type 1

The type of diabetes mellitus called IDDM is a disorder of glucose homeostasis that is characterized by susceptibility to ketoacidosis in the absence of insulin therapy. It is a genetically heterogeneous autoimmune disease affecting about 0.3% of Caucasian populations (Todd, 1990). Genetic studies of IDDM have focused on the identification of loci associated with increased susceptibility to this multifactorial phenotype. The classical phenotype of diabetes mellitus is polydipsia, polyphagia, and polyuria which result from hyperglycemia-induced osmotic diuresis and secondary thirst. These derangements result in long-term complications that affect the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and blood vessels. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
41522
Concept ID:
C0011854
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, X-linked

Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is characterized by inability to concentrate the urine, which results in polyuria (excessive urine production) and polydipsia (excessive thirst). Affected untreated infants usually have poor feeding and failure to thrive, and rapid onset of severe dehydration with illness, hot environment, or the withholding of water. Short stature and secondary dilatation of the ureters and bladder from the high urine volume is common in untreated individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
288785
Concept ID:
C1563705
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Transient neonatal diabetes mellitus 1

6q24-related transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (6q24-TNDM) is defined as transient neonatal diabetes mellitus caused by genetic aberrations of the imprinted locus at 6q24. The cardinal features are: severe intrauterine growth retardation, hyperglycemia that begins in the neonatal period in a term infant and resolves by age 18 months, dehydration, and absence of ketoacidosis. Macroglossia and umbilical hernia are often present. In the subset of children with ZFP57 pathogenic variants, other manifestations can include structural brain abnormalities, developmental delay, and congenital heart disease. Diabetes mellitus usually starts within the first week of life and lasts on average three months but can last longer than a year. Although insulin is usually required initially, the need for insulin gradually declines over time. Intermittent episodes of hyperglycemia may occur in childhood, particularly during intercurrent illnesses. Diabetes mellitus may recur in adolescence or later in adulthood. Women who have had 6q24-TNDM are at risk for relapse during pregnancy. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
371317
Concept ID:
C1832386
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus secretory diarrhea syndrome

IPEX (Immune dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked) syndrome is characterized by systemic autoimmunity, typically beginning in the first year of life. Presentation is most commonly the clinical triad of watery diarrhea, eczematous dermatitis, and endocrinopathy (most commonly insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus). Most children have other autoimmune phenomena including Coombs-positive anemia, autoimmune thrombocytopenia, autoimmune neutropenia, and tubular nephropathy. Without aggressive immunosuppression or bone marrow transplantation, the majority of affected males die within the first one to two years of life from metabolic derangements or sepsis; a few with a milder phenotype have survived into the second or third decade of life. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
83339
Concept ID:
C0342288
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 2

Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy (BSCL) is usually diagnosed at birth or soon thereafter. Because of the absence of functional adipocytes, lipid is stored in other tissues, including muscle and liver. Affected individuals develop insulin resistance and approximately 25%-35% develop diabetes mellitus between ages 15 and 20 years. Hepatomegaly secondary to hepatic steatosis and skeletal muscle hypertrophy occur in all affected individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is reported in 20%-25% of affected individuals and is a significant cause of morbidity from cardiac failure and early mortality. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
318593
Concept ID:
C1720863
Congenital Abnormality
14.

Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, autosomal

Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is characterized by inability to concentrate the urine, which results in polyuria (excessive urine production) and polydipsia (excessive thirst). Affected untreated infants usually have poor feeding and failure to thrive, and rapid onset of severe dehydration with illness, hot environment, or the withholding of water. Short stature and secondary dilatation of the ureters and bladder from the high urine volume is common in untreated individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
289643
Concept ID:
C1563706
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Megaloblastic anemia, thiamine-responsive, with diabetes mellitus and sensorineural deafness

Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome (TRMA) is characterized by megaloblastic anemia, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and diabetes mellitus. Onset of megaloblastic anemia occurs between infancy and adolescence. The anemia is corrected with thiamine treatment, but the red cells remain macrocytic, and anemia can recur when treatment is withdrawn. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss has generally been early and can be detected in toddlers; hearing loss is irreversible and may not be prevented by thiamine treatment. The diabetes mellitus is non-type I in nature, with age of onset from infancy to adolescence. Thiamine treatment may delay onset of diabetes in some individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
83338
Concept ID:
C0342287
Congenital Abnormality
16.

Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is an autosomal dominant disorder of free water conservation characterized by childhood onset of polyuria and polydipsia. Affected individuals are apparently normal at birth, but characteristically develop symptoms of vasopression deficiency during childhood (summary by Wahlstrom et al., 2004). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
146919
Concept ID:
C0687720
Disease or Syndrome
17.

No Treatment for Diabetes

No treatment for diabetes. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
476751
Concept ID:
C3275118
Finding
18.

Microvascular complications of diabetes 6

MedGen UID:
382533
Concept ID:
C2675128
Finding
19.

Microvascular complications of diabetes 4

MedGen UID:
382527
Concept ID:
C2675112
Finding
20.

Bloom syndrome

Bloom’s syndrome (BSyn) is characterized by severe pre- and postnatal growth deficiency, sparseness of subcutaneous fat tissue throughout infancy and early childhood, and short stature throughout postnatal life that in most affected individuals is accompanied by an erythematous and sun-sensitive skin lesion of the face. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is common and very possibly responsible for infections of the upper respiratory tract, the middle ear, and the lung that occur repeatedly in most persons with BSyn. Although most affected individuals have normal intellectual ability, many exhibit a poorly defined learning disability. Women may be fertile, but menopause occurs unusually early; men are infertile. Serious medical complications that are much more common than in the general population and that also appear at unusually early ages are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus resembling the adult-onset type, and cancer of a wide variety of types and anatomic sites. BSyn occurs rarely in all national and ethnic groups but is relatively less rare in Ashkenazi Jews. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
2685
Concept ID:
C0005859
Disease or Syndrome
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