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Elevated serum creatine phosphokinase

MedGen UID:
69128
Concept ID:
C0241005
Finding
Synonyms: CAV3-Related Isolated HyperCKemia; Elevated blood creatine phosphokinase; Elevated circulating creatine phosphokinase; Elevated creatine kinase; Elevated serum CPK; Elevated serum creatine kinase; High serum creatine kinase; HYPERCKEMIA, IDIOPATHIC; Increased CPK; Increased creatine kinase; Increased creatine phosphokinase; Increased serum CK; Increased serum creatine kinase; Increased serum creatine phosphokinase; Isolated HyperCKemia
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal dominant inheritance
MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Intellectual Product
Sources: HPO, OMIM, Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in heterozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, an autosomal dominant disorder is caused when a single copy of the mutant allele is present. Males and females are affected equally, and can both transmit the disorder with a risk of 50% for each child of inheriting the mutant allele.
Autosomal dominant inheritance (HPO, OMIM, Orphanet)
 
Gene (location): CAV3 (3p25.3)
OMIM®: 123320
HPO: HP:0003236

Definition

An elevation of the level of the enzyme creatine kinase (also known as creatine phosphokinase, CPK; EC 2.7.3.2) in the blood. CPK levels can be elevated in a number of clinical disorders such as myocardial infarction, rhabdomyolysis, and muscular dystrophy. [from HPO]

Clinical features

Fatigue
MedGen UID:
41971
Concept ID:
C0015672
Sign or Symptom
A subjective feeling of tiredness characterized by a lack of energy and motivation.
Muscle cramps
MedGen UID:
7749
Concept ID:
C0026821
Sign or Symptom
A sustained and usually painful contraction of muscle fibers. This may occur as an isolated phenomenon or as a manifestation of an underlying disease process (e.g., UREMIA; HYPOTHYROIDISM; MOTOR NEURON DISEASE; etc.). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1398)
Myositis
MedGen UID:
44564
Concept ID:
C0027121
Disease or Syndrome
Idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a group of disorders characterized by inflammation of the muscles used for movement (skeletal muscles). Idiopathic inflammatory myopathy usually appears in adults between ages 40 and 60 or in children between ages 5 and 15, though it can occur at any age.The primary symptom of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is muscle weakness, which develops gradually over a period of weeks to months or even years. Other symptoms include joint pain and general tiredness (fatigue).There are several forms of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy, including polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and sporadic inclusion body myositis.Polymyositis and dermatomyositis involve weakness of the muscles closest to the center of the body (proximal muscles), such as the muscles of the hips and thighs, upper arms, and neck. People with these forms of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy may find it difficult to climb stairs, get up from a seated position, or lift items above their head. In some cases, muscle weakness may make swallowing or breathing difficult.Polymyositis and dermatomyositis have similar symptoms, but dermatomyositis is distinguished by a reddish or purplish rash on the eyelids, elbows, knees, or knuckles. Sometimes, abnormal calcium deposits form hard, painful bumps under the skin (calcinosis).In sporadic inclusion body myositis, the muscles most affected are those of the wrists and fingers and the front of the thigh. Affected individuals may frequently stumble while walking and find it difficult to grasp items. As in dermatomyositis and polymyositis, swallowing can be difficult.
Mitochondrial myopathy
MedGen UID:
56484
Concept ID:
C0162670
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial diseases are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that arise as a result of dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. They can be caused by mutation of genes encoded by either nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). While some mitochondrial disorders only affect a single organ (e.g., the eye in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy [LHON]), many involve multiple organ systems and often present with prominent neurologic and myopathic features. Mitochondrial disorders may present at any age. Many individuals with a mutation of mtDNA display a cluster of clinical features that fall into a discrete clinical syndrome, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF), neurogenic weakness with ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP), or Leigh syndrome (LS). However, considerable clinical variability exists and many individuals do not fit neatly into one particular category, which is well-illustrated by the overlapping spectrum of disease phenotypes (including mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) resulting from mutation of the nuclear gene POLG, which has emerged as a major cause of mitochondrial disease. Common clinical features of mitochondrial disease – whether involving a mitochondrial or nuclear gene – include ptosis, external ophthalmoplegia, proximal myopathy and exercise intolerance, cardiomyopathy, sensorineural deafness, optic atrophy, pigmentary retinopathy, and diabetes mellitus. Common central nervous system findings are fluctuating encephalopathy, seizures, dementia, migraine, stroke-like episodes, ataxia, and spasticity. A high incidence of mid- and late pregnancy loss is a common occurrence that often goes unrecognized.
Myalgia
MedGen UID:
68541
Concept ID:
C0231528
Sign or Symptom
Pain in muscle.
Elevated serum creatine phosphokinase
MedGen UID:
69128
Concept ID:
C0241005
Finding
An elevation of the level of the enzyme creatine kinase (also known as creatine phosphokinase, CPK; EC 2.7.3.2) in the blood. CPK levels can be elevated in a number of clinical disorders such as myocardial infarction, rhabdomyolysis, and muscular dystrophy.
Increased muscle fatiguability
MedGen UID:
116713
Concept ID:
C0242979
Finding
An abnormal, increased fatiguability of the musculature.
Exercise-induced muscle cramps
MedGen UID:
383715
Concept ID:
C1855578
Finding
Sudden and involuntary contractions of one or more muscles brought on by physical exertion.
Muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
351199
Concept ID:
C1864711
Finding
The term dystrophy means abnormal growth. However, muscular dystrophy is used to describe primary myopathies with a genetic basis and a progressive course characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting, defects in muscle proteins, and histological features of muscle fiber degeneration (necrosis) and regeneration. If possible, it is preferred to use other HPO terms to describe the precise phenotypic abnormalities.
Abnormality of muscle fibers
MedGen UID:
867300
Concept ID:
C4021663
Anatomical Abnormality
Any abnormality of the skeletal muscle cell. Muscle fibers are subdivided into two types. Type I fibers are fatigue-resistant and rich in oxidative enzymes (they stain light with the myosin ATPase reaction), and type II fibers are fast-contracting, fatigue-prone, and rich in glycolytic enzymes (these fibers stain darkly). Normal muscle tissue has a random distribution of type I and type II fibers.
EMG: myopathic abnormalities
MedGen UID:
867362
Concept ID:
C4021726
Pathologic Function
The presence of abnormal electromyographic patterns indicative of myopathy, such as small-short polyphasic motor unit potentials.

Term Hierarchy

Conditions with this feature

Duchenne muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
3925
Concept ID:
C0013264
Disease or Syndrome
The dystrophinopathies cover a spectrum of X-linked muscle disease ranging from mild to severe that includes Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Becker muscular dystrophy, and DMD-associated dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The mild end of the spectrum includes the phenotypes of asymptomatic increase in serum concentration of creatine phosphokinase (CK) and muscle cramps with myoglobinuria. The severe end of the spectrum includes progressive muscle diseases that are classified as Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy when skeletal muscle is primarily affected and as DMD-associated dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) when the heart is primarily affected. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) usually presents in early childhood with delayed motor milestones including delays in walking independently and standing up from a supine position. Proximal weakness causes a waddling gait and difficulty climbing stairs, running, jumping, and standing up from a squatting position. DMD is rapidly progressive, with affected children being wheelchair dependent by age 12 years. Cardiomyopathy occurs in almost all individuals with DMD after age 18 years. Few survive beyond the third decade, with respiratory complications and progressive cardiomyopathy being common causes of death. Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is characterized by later-onset skeletal muscle weakness. With improved diagnostic techniques, it has been recognized that the mild end of the spectrum includes men with onset of symptoms after age 30 years who remain ambulatory even into their 60s. Despite the milder skeletal muscle involvement, heart failure from DCM is a common cause of morbidity and the most common cause of death in BMD. Mean age of death is in the mid-40s. DMD-associated DCM is characterized by left ventricular dilation and congestive heart failure. Females heterozygous for a DMD pathogenic variant are at increased risk for DCM.
Glycogen storage disease, type II
MedGen UID:
5340
Concept ID:
C0017921
Disease or Syndrome
Pompe disease is classified by age of onset, organ involvement, severity, and rate of progression. Infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD; individuals with onset before age 12 months with cardiomyopathy) may be apparent in utero but more typically onset is at the median age of four months with hypotonia, generalized muscle weakness, feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, respiratory distress, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Without treatment by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), IOPD commonly results in death by age two years from progressive left ventricular outflow obstruction and respiratory insufficiency. Late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD; including: (a) individuals with onset before age 12 months without cardiomyopathy; and (b) all individuals with onset after age 12 months) is characterized by proximal muscle weakness and respiratory insufficiency; clinically significant cardiac involvement is uncommon.
Glycogen storage disease type III
MedGen UID:
6641
Concept ID:
C0017922
Disease or Syndrome
Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III) is characterized by variable liver, cardiac muscle, and skeletal muscle involvement. GSD IIIa is the most common subtype, present in about 85% of affected individuals; it manifests with liver and muscle involvement. GSD IIIb, with liver involvement only, comprises about 15% of all GSD III. In infancy and early childhood, liver involvement presents as ketotic hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, hyperlipidemia, and elevated hepatic transaminases. In adolescence and adulthood, liver disease becomes less prominent. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy develops in the majority of those with GSD IIIa, usually during childhood. Its clinical significance ranges from asymptomatic in the majority to severe cardiac dysfunction, congestive heart failure, and (rarely) sudden death. Skeletal myopathy manifesting as weakness is not usually evident in childhood, but slowly progresses, typically becoming prominent in the third to fourth decade.
Glycogen storage disease, type V
MedGen UID:
5341
Concept ID:
C0017924
Disease or Syndrome
Glycogen storage disease type V (GSDV, McArdle disease) is a metabolic myopathy characterized by exercise intolerance manifested by rapid fatigue, myalgia, and cramps in exercising muscles. Symptoms usually are precipitated by isometric exercise or sustained aerobic exercise. Most individuals improve their exercise tolerance by exploiting the "second wind" phenomenon with relief of myalgia and fatigue after a few minutes of rest. Age of onset is frequently in the first decade of life but can vary. Fixed muscle weakness occurs in approximately 25% of affected individuals, is more likely to involve proximal muscles, and is more common in individuals of advanced age. Approximately 50% of affected individuals have recurrent episodes of myoglobinuria that could eventually result in acute renal failure, although reported cases are rare.
Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility
MedGen UID:
9867
Concept ID:
C0024591
Disease or Syndrome
Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle calcium regulation associated with uncontrolled skeletal muscle hypermetabolism. Manifestations of malignant hyperthermia (MH) are precipitated by certain volatile anesthetics (i.e., halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, enflurane), either alone or in conjunction with a depolarizing muscle relaxant (specifically, succinylcholine). The triggering substances release calcium stores from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and may promote entry of calcium from the myoplasm, causing contracture of skeletal muscles, glycogenolysis, and increased cellular metabolism, resulting in production of heat and excess lactate. Affected individuals experience: acidosis, hypercapnia, tachycardia, hyperthermia, muscle rigidity, compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis with subsequent increase in serum creatine kinase (CK) concentration, hyperkalemia with a risk for cardiac arrhythmia or even arrest, and myoglobinuria with a risk for renal failure. In nearly all cases, the first manifestations of MH (tachycardia and tachypnea) occur in the operating room; however, MH may also occur in the early postoperative period. There is mounting evidence that some affected individuals will also develop MH with exercise and/or on exposure to hot environments. Without proper and prompt treatment with dantrolene sodium, mortality is extremely high.
Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome
MedGen UID:
6222
Concept ID:
C0024814
Disease or Syndrome
Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome (MSS) is characterized by cerebellar ataxia with cerebellar atrophy, dysarthria, nystagmus, early-onset (not necessarily congenital) cataracts, myopathy, muscle weakness, and hypotonia. Additional features may include psychomotor delay, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, short stature, and various skeletal abnormalities. Children with MSS usually present with muscular hypotonia in early infancy; distal and proximal muscular weakness is noticed during the first decade of life. Later, cerebellar findings of truncal ataxia, dysdiadochokinesia, nystagmus, and dysarthria become apparent. Motor function worsens progressively for some years, then stabilizes at an unpredictable age and degree of severity. Cataracts can develop rapidly and typically require lens extraction in the first decade of life. Although many adults have severe disabilities, life span in MSS appears to be near normal.
Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
65956
Concept ID:
C0238288
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal dominant degenerative muscle disease characterized by slowly progressive weakness of the muscles of the face, upper-arm, and shoulder girdle. The onset of symptoms usually occurs in the first or second decade of life. Affected individuals usually present with impairment of upper extremity elevation. This tends to be followed by facial weakness, primarily involving the orbicularis oris and orbicularis oculi muscles. (Neuromuscul Disord 1997;7(1):55-62; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1420)
Familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis
MedGen UID:
68665
Concept ID:
C0238357
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperPP) is characterized by attacks of flaccid limb weakness (which may also include weakness of the muscles of the eyes, throat, and trunk), hyperkalemia (serum potassium concentration >5 mmol/L) or an increase of serum potassium concentration of at least 1.5 mmol/L during an attack of weakness and/or provoking/worsening of an attack by oral potassium intake, normal serum potassium between attacks, and onset before age 20 years. Although the absence of paramyotonia (muscle stiffness aggravated by cold and exercise) was originally postulated as a means of distinguishing hyperPP from paramyotonia congenita (PMC), approximately 45% of individuals with hyperPP have paramyotonia. In approximately half of affected individuals, attacks of flaccid muscle weakness begin in the first decade of life, with 25% reporting their first attack at age ten years or older. Initially infrequent, the attacks then increase in frequency and severity over time until approximately age 50 years, after which the frequency of attacks declines considerably. Potassium-rich food or rest after exercise may precipitate an attack. A cold environment and emotional stress provoke or worsen the attacks. A spontaneous attack commonly starts in the morning before breakfast, lasts for 15 minutes to one hour, and then disappears. Cardiac arrhythmia or respiratory insufficiency usually does not occur during attacks. Between attacks, approximately half of individuals with hyperPP have mild myotonia (muscle stiffness) that does not impede voluntary movements. More than 80% of individuals with hyperPP older than 40 years report permanent muscle weakness and about one third develop a chronic progressive myopathy.
Elevated serum creatine phosphokinase
MedGen UID:
69128
Concept ID:
C0241005
Finding
An elevation of the level of the enzyme creatine kinase (also known as creatine phosphokinase, CPK; EC 2.7.3.2) in the blood. CPK levels can be elevated in a number of clinical disorders such as myocardial infarction, rhabdomyolysis, and muscular dystrophy.
Isaac syndrome
MedGen UID:
116151
Concept ID:
C0242287
Disease or Syndrome
A rare neuromuscular disorder with onset usually in late childhood or early adulthood, characterized by intermittent or continuous widespread involuntary muscle contractions; FASCICULATION; hyporeflexia; MUSCLE CRAMP; MUSCLE WEAKNESS; HYPERHIDROSIS; TACHYCARDIA; and MYOKYMIA. Involvement of pharyngeal or laryngeal muscles may interfere with speech and breathing. The continuous motor activity persists during sleep and general anesthesia (distinguishing this condition from STIFF-PERSON SYNDROME). Familial and acquired (primarily autoimmune) forms have been reported. (From Ann NY Acad Sci 1998 May 13;841:482-496; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1491)
Walker-Warburg congenital muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
75553
Concept ID:
C0265221
Disease or Syndrome
Walker-Warburg syndrome is an inherited disorder that affects development of the muscles, brain, and eyes. It is the most severe of a group of genetic conditions known as congenital muscular dystrophies, which cause muscle weakness and wasting (atrophy) beginning very early in life. The signs and symptoms of Walker-Warburg syndrome are present at birth or in early infancy. Because of the severity of the problems caused by Walker-Warburg syndrome, most affected individuals do not survive past age 3.Walker-Warburg syndrome affects the skeletal muscles, which are muscles the body uses for movement. Affected babies have weak muscle tone (hypotonia) and are sometimes described as "floppy." The muscle weakness worsens over time.Walker-Warburg syndrome also affects the brain; individuals with this condition typically have a brain abnormality called cobblestone lissencephaly, in which the surface of the brain lacks the normal folds and grooves and instead develops a bumpy, irregular appearance (like that of cobblestones). These individuals may also have a buildup of fluid in the brain (hydrocephalus) or abnormalities of certain parts of the brain, including a region called the cerebellum and the part of the brain that connects to the spinal cord (the brainstem). These changes in the structure of the brain lead to significantly delayed development and intellectual disability. Some individuals with Walker-Warburg syndrome experience seizures.Eye abnormalities are also characteristic of Walker-Warburg syndrome. These can include unusually small eyeballs (microphthalmia), enlarged eyeballs caused by increased pressure in the eyes (buphthalmos), clouding of the lenses of the eyes (cataracts), and problems with the nerve that relays visual information from the eyes to the brain (the optic nerve). These eye problems lead to vision impairment in affected individuals.
Glycogen storage disease type X
MedGen UID:
120613
Concept ID:
C0268149
Disease or Syndrome
Phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency is a disorder that primarily affects muscles used for movement (skeletal muscles). Beginning in childhood or adolescence, affected individuals experience muscle aches or cramping following strenuous physical activity. Some people with this condition also have recurrent episodes of myoglobinuria. Myoglobinuria occurs when muscle tissue breaks down abnormally and releases a protein called myoglobin, which is processed by the kidneys and released in the urine. If untreated, myoglobinuria can lead to kidney failure.In some cases of phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency, microscopic tube-shaped structures called tubular aggregates are seen in muscle fibers. It is unclear how tubular aggregates are associated with the signs and symptoms of the disorder.
Sarcotubular myopathy
MedGen UID:
78750
Concept ID:
C0270968
Congenital Abnormality
Carnitine acylcarnitine translocase deficiency
MedGen UID:
91000
Concept ID:
C0342791
Disease or Syndrome
Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder of long-chain fatty acid oxidation. Metabolic consequences include hypoketotic hypoglycemia under fasting conditions, hyperammonemia, elevated creatine kinase and transaminases, dicarboxylic aciduria, very low free carnitine and abnormal acylcarnitine profile with marked elevation of the long-chain acylcarnitines. Clinical features include neurologic abnormalities, cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias, skeletal muscle damage, and liver dysfunction. Most patients become symptomatic in the neonatal period with a rapidly progressive deterioration and a high mortality rate. However, presentations at a later age with a milder phenotype have been reported (summary by Rubio-Gozalbo et al., 2004).
Choreoacanthocytosis
MedGen UID:
98277
Concept ID:
C0393576
Disease or Syndrome
Chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc) is characterized by a progressive movement disorder, cognitive and behavior changes, a myopathy that can be subclinical, and chronic hyperCKemia in serum. Although the disorder is named for acanthocytosis of the red blood cells, this feature is variable. The movement disorder is mostly limb chorea, but some individuals present with parkinsonism. Dystonia is common and affects the oral region and especially the tongue, causing dysarthria and serious dysphagia with resultant weight loss. Habitual tongue and lip biting are characteristic, as well as tongue protrusion dystonia. Progressive cognitive and behavioral changes resemble those in a frontal lobe syndrome. Seizures are observed in almost half of affected individuals and can be the initial manifestation. Myopathy results in progressive distal muscle wasting and weakness. Mean age of onset in ChAc is about 30 years, although ChAc can develop as early as the first decade or as late as the seventh decade. It runs a chronic progressive course and may lead to major disability within a few years. Life expectancy is reduced, with age of death ranging from 28 to 61 years.
McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
140765
Concept ID:
C0398568
Disease or Syndrome
McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome (designated as MLS throughout this review) is a multisystem disorder with central nervous system (CNS), neuromuscular, and hematologic manifestations in males. CNS manifestations are a neurodegenerative basal ganglia disease including (1) movement disorders, (2) cognitive alterations, and (3) psychiatric symptoms. Neuromuscular manifestations include a (mostly subclinical) sensorimotor axonopathy and muscle weakness or atrophy of different degrees. Hematologically, MLS is defined as a specific blood group phenotype (named after the first proband, Hugh McLeod) that results from absent expression of the Kx erythrocyte antigen and weakened expression of Kell blood group antigens. The hematologic manifestations are red blood cell acanthocytosis and compensated hemolysis. Allo-antibodies in the Kell and Kx blood group system can cause strong reactions to transfusions of incompatible blood and severe anemia in newborns of Kell-negative mothers. Females heterozygous for XK pathogenic variants have mosaicism for the Kell and Kx blood group antigens but usually lack CNS and neuromuscular manifestations; however, some heterozygous females may develop clinical manifestations including chorea or late-onset cognitive decline.
Severe autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy of childhood - North African type
MedGen UID:
98045
Concept ID:
C0410173
Disease or Syndrome
Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
140820
Concept ID:
C0410174
Disease or Syndrome
Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) is characterized by hypotonia, symmetric generalized muscle weakness, and CNS migration disturbances that result in changes consistent with cobblestone (previously type II) lissencephaly with cerebral and cerebellar cortical dysplasia. Mild, typical, and severe phenotypes are recognized. Onset typically occurs in early infancy, with a poor suck, weak cry, and floppiness. Affected individuals have contractures of the hips, knees, and interphalangeal joints. Later features include myopathic facial appearance, pseudohypertrophy of the calves and forearms, motor and speech retardation, intellectual disability, seizures, ophthalmologic abnormalities including visual impairment and retinal dysplasia, and progressive cardiac involvement in individuals older than age ten years. Swallowing disturbance occurs in individuals with severe FCMD and in individuals older than age ten years, leading to recurrent aspiration pneumonia and death.
Myopathy with tubular aggregates
MedGen UID:
98050
Concept ID:
C0410207
Disease or Syndrome
Muscle eye brain disease
MedGen UID:
105341
Concept ID:
C0457133
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A), which includes both the more severe Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and the slightly less severe muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, congenital muscular dystrophy, and death usually in the first years of life. It represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of DAG1 (128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (summary by Godfrey et al., 2007). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy 1, X-linked
MedGen UID:
148284
Concept ID:
C0751337
Disease or Syndrome
Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is characterized by the clinical triad of joint contractures that begin in early childhood, slowly progressive muscle weakness and wasting initially in a humero-peroneal distribution that later extends to the scapular and pelvic girdle muscles, and cardiac involvement that may manifest as palpitations, presyncope and syncope, poor exercise tolerance, and congestive heart failure. Age of onset, severity, and progression of muscle and cardiac involvement demonstrate both inter- and intrafamilial variability. Clinical variability ranges from early onset with severe presentation in childhood to late onset with slow progression in adulthood. In general, joint contractures appear during the first two decades, followed by muscle weakness and wasting. Cardiac involvement usually occurs after the second decade.
Myotonia fluctuans
MedGen UID:
156269
Concept ID:
C0752355
Disease or Syndrome
A form of potassium-aggravated myotonia which is cold insensitive, dramatically fluctuating and profoundly worsened by potassium ingestion. Fluctuating myotonia develops during childhood or adolescence and involves the extraocular, bulbar and limb muscles. Myotonia fluctuans is a sodium muscle channelopathy due to missense mutations of the SCN4A gene encoding the alpha subunit of the skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.4. Transmission is autosomal dominant.
Cowchock syndrome
MedGen UID:
162891
Concept ID:
C0795910
Disease or Syndrome
Cowchock syndrome (COWCK) is an X-linked recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by early childhood onset of a slowly progressive axonal sensorimotor neuropathy associated in some patients with sensorineural deafness and cognitive impairment (summary by Rinaldi et al., 2012).
Danon disease
MedGen UID:
209235
Concept ID:
C0878677
Disease or Syndrome
Danon disease is an X-linked dominant disorder predominantly affecting cardiac muscle. Skeletal muscle involvement and mental retardation are variable features. The accumulation of glycogen in muscle and lysosomes originally led to the classification of Danon disease as a variant of glycogen storage disease II (Pompe disease; 232300) with 'normal acid maltase' or alpha-glucosidase (GAA; 606800) (Danon et al., 1981). However, Nishino et al. (2000) stated that Danon disease is not a glycogen storage disease because glycogen is not always increased. Sugie et al. (2005) classified Danon disease as a form of autophagic vacuolar myopathy, characterized by intracytoplasmic autophagic vacuoles with sarcolemmal features. The characteristic vacuole is believed to be an autolysosome surrounded by secondarily-generated membranes containing sarcolemmal proteins, basal lamina, and acetylcholinesterase activity. X-linked myopathy with excessive autophagy (XMEA; 310440) is a distinct disorder with similar pathologic features.
Becker muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
182959
Concept ID:
C0917713
Disease or Syndrome
The dystrophinopathies cover a spectrum of X-linked muscle disease ranging from mild to severe that includes Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Becker muscular dystrophy, and DMD-associated dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The mild end of the spectrum includes the phenotypes of asymptomatic increase in serum concentration of creatine phosphokinase (CK) and muscle cramps with myoglobinuria. The severe end of the spectrum includes progressive muscle diseases that are classified as Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy when skeletal muscle is primarily affected and as DMD-associated dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) when the heart is primarily affected. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) usually presents in early childhood with delayed motor milestones including delays in walking independently and standing up from a supine position. Proximal weakness causes a waddling gait and difficulty climbing stairs, running, jumping, and standing up from a squatting position. DMD is rapidly progressive, with affected children being wheelchair dependent by age 12 years. Cardiomyopathy occurs in almost all individuals with DMD after age 18 years. Few survive beyond the third decade, with respiratory complications and progressive cardiomyopathy being common causes of death. Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is characterized by later-onset skeletal muscle weakness. With improved diagnostic techniques, it has been recognized that the mild end of the spectrum includes men with onset of symptoms after age 30 years who remain ambulatory even into their 60s. Despite the milder skeletal muscle involvement, heart failure from DCM is a common cause of morbidity and the most common cause of death in BMD. Mean age of death is in the mid-40s. DMD-associated DCM is characterized by left ventricular dilation and congestive heart failure. Females heterozygous for a DMD pathogenic variant are at increased risk for DCM.
Merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
224728
Concept ID:
C1263858
Disease or Syndrome
Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy is an autosomal recessive form of muscular dystrophy characterized by muscle weakness apparent at birth or in the first 6 months of life. Patients show hypotonia, poor suck and cry, and delayed motor development; most never achieve independent ambulation. Most patients also have periventricular white matter abnormalities on brain imaging, but mental retardation and/or seizures occur only rarely (summary by Xiong et al., 2015).
Muscular dystrophy, cardiac type
MedGen UID:
254845
Concept ID:
C1442927
Disease or Syndrome
Episodic ataxia type 1
MedGen UID:
318554
Concept ID:
C1719788
Disease or Syndrome
Episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) is a potassium channelopathy characterized by constant myokymia and dramatic episodes of spastic contractions of the skeletal muscles of the head, arms, and legs with loss of both motor coordination and balance. During attacks individuals may experience a number of variable symptoms including vertigo, blurred vision, diplopia, nausea, headache, diaphoresis, clumsiness, stiffening of the body, dysarthric speech, and difficulty in breathing, among others. EA1 may be associated with epilepsy. Other possible associations include delayed motor development, cognitive disability, choreoathetosis, and carpal spasm. Usually, onset is in childhood or early adolescence.
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 2F
MedGen UID:
331308
Concept ID:
C1832525
Disease or Syndrome
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy is a term for a group of diseases that cause weakness and wasting of the muscles in the arms and legs. The muscles most affected are those closest to the body (proximal muscles), specifically the muscles of the shoulders, upper arms, pelvic area, and thighs.The severity, age of onset, and features of limb-girdle muscle dystrophy vary among the many subtypes of this condition and may be inconsistent even within the same family. Signs and symptoms may first appear at any age and generally worsen with time, although in some cases they remain mild.In the early stages of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, affected individuals may have an unusual walking gait, such as waddling or walking on the balls of their feet, and may also have difficulty running. They may need to use their arms to press themselves up from a squatting position because of their weak thigh muscles. As the condition progresses, people with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy may eventually require wheelchair assistance.Muscle wasting may cause changes in posture or in the appearance of the shoulder, back, and arm. In particular, weak shoulder muscles tend to make the shoulder blades (scapulae) "stick out" from the back, a sign known as scapular winging. Affected individuals may also have an abnormally curved lower back (lordosis) or a spine that curves to the side (scoliosis). Some develop joint stiffness (contractures) that can restrict movement in their hips, knees, ankles, or elbows. Overgrowth (hypertrophy) of the calf muscles occurs in some people with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.Weakening of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy) occurs in some forms of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Some affected individuals experience mild to severe breathing problems related to the weakness of muscles needed for breathing. In some cases, the breathing problems are severe enough that affected individuals need to use a machine to help them breathe (mechanical ventilation).Intelligence is generally unaffected in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy; however, developmental delay and intellectual disability have been reported in rare forms of the disorder.
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 1C
MedGen UID:
371358
Concept ID:
C1832567
Disease or Syndrome
The caveolinopathies, a group of muscle diseases, can be classified into five phenotypes, which can be seen in different members of the same family: Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1C (LGMD1C), characterized by onset usually in the first decade, mild-to-moderate proximal muscle weakness, calf hypertrophy, positive Gower sign, and variable muscle cramps after exercise. Isolated hyperCKemia (i.e., elevated serum concentration of creatine kinase (CK) in the absence of signs of muscle disease) (HCK). Rippling muscle disease (RMD), characterized by signs of increased muscle irritability, such as percussion-induced rapid contraction (PIRC), percussion-induced muscle mounding (PIMM), and/or electrically silent muscle contractions (rippling muscle). Distal myopathy (DM), observed in one individual only Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), without skeletal muscle manifestations.
Proximal myopathy with focal depletion of mitochondria
MedGen UID:
318881
Concept ID:
C1833453
Disease or Syndrome
Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency, infantile
MedGen UID:
322211
Concept ID:
C1833511
Disease or Syndrome
Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is a disorder of long-chain fatty-acid oxidation. The three clinical presentations are lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form, and myopathic form (which is usually mild and can manifest from infancy to adulthood). While the former two are severe multisystemic diseases characterized by liver failure with hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, seizures, and early death, the latter is characterized by exercise-induced muscle pain and weakness, sometimes associated with myoglobinuria. The myopathic form of CPT II deficiency is the most common disorder of lipid metabolism affecting skeletal muscle and the most frequent cause of hereditary myoglobinuria. Males are more likely to be affected than females.
Inclusion body myopathy with early-onset Paget disease and frontotemporal dementia
MedGen UID:
322251
Concept ID:
C1833662
Disease or Syndrome
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy
MedGen UID:
320250
Concept ID:
C1834014
Disease or Syndrome
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy (OPDM) is characterized by adult-onset of eye and facial muscle weakness, distal muscle weakness and atrophy, and pharyngeal involvement, resulting in dysphagia and dysarthria. There are variable manifestations of the disorder regarding muscle involvement and severity. Both autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant inheritance have been reported. OPDM is considered distinct from oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD; 164300), which is caused by mutation in the PABPN1 gene (602279) (summary by Durmus et al., 2011).
Myopathy with storage of glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans
MedGen UID:
371846
Concept ID:
C1834532
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy, Distal, with Onset in Infancy
MedGen UID:
320382
Concept ID:
C1834556
Disease or Syndrome
Myoglobinuria, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
320384
Concept ID:
C1834567
Disease or Syndrome
A rare metabolic myopathy with characteristics of episodic myalgia with myoglobinuria which is induced by fever, viral or bacterial infection, prolonged exercise or alcohol abuse, and could, on occasion, lead to acute renal failure. Between episodes, patients may be asymptomatic or could present elevated creatine kinase levels and mild muscle weakness. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1997.
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 1B
MedGen UID:
320400
Concept ID:
C1834653
Disease or Syndrome
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy is a term for a group of diseases that cause weakness and wasting of the muscles in the arms and legs. The muscles most affected are those closest to the body (proximal muscles), specifically the muscles of the shoulders, upper arms, pelvic area, and thighs.The severity, age of onset, and features of limb-girdle muscle dystrophy vary among the many subtypes of this condition and may be inconsistent even within the same family. Signs and symptoms may first appear at any age and generally worsen with time, although in some cases they remain mild.In the early stages of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, affected individuals may have an unusual walking gait, such as waddling or walking on the balls of their feet, and may also have difficulty running. They may need to use their arms to press themselves up from a squatting position because of their weak thigh muscles. As the condition progresses, people with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy may eventually require wheelchair assistance.Muscle wasting may cause changes in posture or in the appearance of the shoulder, back, and arm. In particular, weak shoulder muscles tend to make the shoulder blades (scapulae) "stick out" from the back, a sign known as scapular winging. Affected individuals may also have an abnormally curved lower back (lordosis) or a spine that curves to the side (scoliosis). Some develop joint stiffness (contractures) that can restrict movement in their hips, knees, ankles, or elbows. Overgrowth (hypertrophy) of the calf muscles occurs in some people with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.Weakening of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy) occurs in some forms of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Some affected individuals experience mild to severe breathing problems related to the weakness of muscles needed for breathing. In some cases, the breathing problems are severe enough that affected individuals need to use a machine to help them breathe (mechanical ventilation).Intelligence is generally unaffected in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy; however, developmental delay and intellectual disability have been reported in rare forms of the disorder.
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 1A
MedGen UID:
331802
Concept ID:
C1834659
Disease or Syndrome
LGMD1 is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by adult onset of proximal muscle weakness, beginning in the hip girdle region and later progressing to the shoulder girdle region. Distal muscle weakness may occur later. Daniele et al. (2007) provided a review of therapeutic strategies in various forms of LGMD, including ongoing studies in gene therapy. Genetic Heterogeneity of Autosomal Dominant Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Other forms of autosomal dominant LGMD include LGMD1B (159001), caused by mutation in the LMNA gene (150330) on chromosome 1q22; LGMD1C (607801), caused by mutation in the CAV3 gene (601253) on chromosome 3p25; LGMD1E (603511), caused by mutation in the DNAJB6 gene (611332) on chromosome 7q36; LGMD1F (608423), caused by mutation in the TNPO3 gene (610032) on chromosome 7q32; LGMD1G (609115), caused by mutation in the HNRNPDL gene (607137) on chromosome 4q21; and LGMD1H (613530), which maps to chromosome 3p25-p23. The symbol LGMD1D was formerly used for a disorder later found to be the same as desmin-related myopathy (601419).
Muscle cramps, familial
MedGen UID:
371885
Concept ID:
C1834708
Disease or Syndrome
Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility type 2
MedGen UID:
371986
Concept ID:
C1835161
Finding
Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle calcium regulation associated with uncontrolled skeletal muscle hypermetabolism. Manifestations of malignant hyperthermia (MH) are precipitated by certain volatile anesthetics (i.e., halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, enflurane), either alone or in conjunction with a depolarizing muscle relaxant (specifically, succinylcholine). The triggering substances release calcium stores from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and may promote entry of calcium from the myoplasm, causing contracture of skeletal muscles, glycogenolysis, and increased cellular metabolism, resulting in production of heat and excess lactate. Affected individuals experience: acidosis, hypercapnia, tachycardia, hyperthermia, muscle rigidity, compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis with subsequent increase in serum creatine kinase (CK) concentration, hyperkalemia with a risk for cardiac arrhythmia or even arrest, and myoglobinuria with a risk for renal failure. In nearly all cases, the first manifestations of MH (tachycardia and tachypnea) occur in the operating room; however, MH may also occur in the early postoperative period. There is mounting evidence that some affected individuals will also develop MH with exercise and/or on exposure to hot environments. Without proper and prompt treatment with dantrolene sodium, mortality is extremely high.
Myofibrillar myopathy, filamin C-related
MedGen UID:
372186
Concept ID:
C1836050
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy is characterized by slowly progressive weakness that can involve both proximal and distal muscles. Distal muscle weakness is present in about 80% of individuals and is more pronounced than proximal weakness in about 25%. A minority of individuals experience sensory symptoms, muscle stiffness, aching, or cramps. Peripheral neuropathy is present in about 20% of affected individuals. Overt cardiomyopathy is present in 15%-30%.
Myofibrillar myopathy, ZASP-related
MedGen UID:
322840
Concept ID:
C1836155
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy is characterized by slowly progressive weakness that can involve both proximal and distal muscles. Distal muscle weakness is present in about 80% of individuals and is more pronounced than proximal weakness in about 25%. A minority of individuals experience sensory symptoms, muscle stiffness, aching, or cramps. Peripheral neuropathy is present in about 20% of affected individuals. Overt cardiomyopathy is present in 15%-30%.
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy, type C1
MedGen UID:
332193
Concept ID:
C1836373
Disease or Syndrome
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239) represent the mildest end of the phenotypic spectrum of muscular dystrophies collectively known as dystroglycanopathies. The limb-girdle phenotype is characterized by onset of muscular weakness apparent after ambulation is achieved; mental retardation and mild brain anomalies are variable (Balci et al., 2005; review by Godfrey et al., 2007). The most severe end of the phenotypic spectrum of dystroglycanopathies is represented by congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A; see MDDGA1, 236670), previously designated Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) or muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), and the intermediate range of the spectrum is represented by congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with or without mental retardation (type B; see MDDGB1, 613155). Genetic Heterogeneity of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy-Dystroglycanopathy (Type C) Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy due to defective glycosylation of DAG1 is genetically heterogeneous. See also MDDGC2 (613158), caused by mutation in the POMT2 gene (607439); MDDGC3 (613157), caused by mutation in the POMGNT1 gene (606822); MDDGC4 (611588), caused by mutation in the FKTN gene (607440); MDDGC5 (607155), caused by mutation in the FKRP gene (606596); MDDGC7 (616052), caused by mutation in the ISPD gene (614631); MDDGC8 (618135), caused by mutation in the POMGNT2 gene (614828); MDDGC9 (613818) caused by mutation in the DAG1 gene (128239); MDDGC12 (616094), caused by mutation in the POMK gene (615247); MDDGC14 (615352) caused by mutation in the GMPPB gene (615320); and MDDGC15 (612937), caused by mutation in the DPM3 gene (605951).
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 1G
MedGen UID:
322993
Concept ID:
C1836765
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-3 is characterized by slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs. Onset is usually in adulthood, but can occur during the teenage years. Affected individuals may also develop cataracts before age 50 (summary by Vieira et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDD1 (603511).
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with mental retardation, type B6
MedGen UID:
373284
Concept ID:
C1837229
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGB6 is an autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy with mental retardation and structural brain abnormalities (Longman et al., 2003). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Mercuri et al., 2009). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B, see MDDGB1 (613155).
Alpha-B crystallinopathy
MedGen UID:
324735
Concept ID:
C1837317
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy is characterized by slowly progressive weakness that can involve both proximal and distal muscles. Distal muscle weakness is present in about 80% of individuals and is more pronounced than proximal weakness in about 25%. A minority of individuals experience sensory symptoms, muscle stiffness, aching, or cramps. Peripheral neuropathy is present in about 20% of affected individuals. Overt cardiomyopathy is present in 15%-30%.
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 2J
MedGen UID:
324741
Concept ID:
C1837342
Disease or Syndrome
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy is a term for a group of diseases that cause weakness and wasting of the muscles in the arms and legs. The muscles most affected are those closest to the body (proximal muscles), specifically the muscles of the shoulders, upper arms, pelvic area, and thighs.The severity, age of onset, and features of limb-girdle muscle dystrophy vary among the many subtypes of this condition and may be inconsistent even within the same family. Signs and symptoms may first appear at any age and generally worsen with time, although in some cases they remain mild.In the early stages of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, affected individuals may have an unusual walking gait, such as waddling or walking on the balls of their feet, and may also have difficulty running. They may need to use their arms to press themselves up from a squatting position because of their weak thigh muscles. As the condition progresses, people with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy may eventually require wheelchair assistance.Muscle wasting may cause changes in posture or in the appearance of the shoulder, back, and arm. In particular, weak shoulder muscles tend to make the shoulder blades (scapulae) "stick out" from the back, a sign known as scapular winging. Affected individuals may also have an abnormally curved lower back (lordosis) or a spine that curves to the side (scoliosis). Some develop joint stiffness (contractures) that can restrict movement in their hips, knees, ankles, or elbows. Overgrowth (hypertrophy) of the calf muscles occurs in some people with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.Weakening of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy) occurs in some forms of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Some affected individuals experience mild to severe breathing problems related to the weakness of muscles needed for breathing. In some cases, the breathing problems are severe enough that affected individuals need to use a machine to help them breathe (mechanical ventilation).Intelligence is generally unaffected in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy; however, developmental delay and intellectual disability have been reported in rare forms of the disorder.
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1E
MedGen UID:
324784
Concept ID:
C1837396
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) are metabolic deficiencies in glycoprotein biosynthesis that usually cause severe mental and psychomotor retardation. Different forms of CDGs can be recognized by altered isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns of serum transferrin. For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG Ia (212065) and CDG Ib (602579).
Mitochondrial myopathy with diabetes
MedGen UID:
333236
Concept ID:
C1839028
Disease or Syndrome
Bulbo-spinal atrophy X-linked
MedGen UID:
333282
Concept ID:
C1839259
Disease or Syndrome
Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a gradually progressive neuromuscular disorder in which degeneration of lower motor neurons results in muscle weakness, muscle atrophy, and fasciculations. SBMA occurs only in males. Affected individuals often show gynecomastia, testicular atrophy, and reduced fertility as a result of mild androgen insensitivity.
Myopathy, X-linked, with excessive autophagy
MedGen UID:
374264
Concept ID:
C1839615
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked myopathy with excessive autophagy (XMEA) is an X-linked recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized by childhood onset of progressive muscle weakness and atrophy primarily affecting the proximal muscles. While onset is usually in childhood, it can range from infancy to adulthood. Many patients lose ambulation and become wheelchair-bound. Other organ systems, including the heart, are clinically unaffected. Muscle biopsy shows intracytoplasmic autophagic vacuoles with sarcolemmal features and a multilayered basal membrane (summary by Ramachandran et al., 2013; Kurashige et al., 2013, and Ruggieri et al., 2015). Danon disease (300257), caused by mutation in the LAMP2 gene (309060) on chromosome Xq24, is a distinct disorder with similar pathologic features.
Muscular dystrophy, progressive pectorodorsal
MedGen UID:
326550
Concept ID:
C1839669
Disease or Syndrome
King Denborough syndrome
MedGen UID:
327082
Concept ID:
C1840365
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic non-dystrophic myopathy with characteristics of the triad of congenital myopathy, dysmorphic features and susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia. Patients present with a wide phenotypic range, including delayed motor development, muscle weakness and fatigability, ptosis and myopathic facies (with or without creatine kinase elevations), skeletal abnormalities (short stature, scoliosis, kyphosis, lumbar lordosis and pectus carinatum/excavatum), mild dysmorphic facial features (hypertelorism, down-slanting palpebral fissures, epicanthic folds, low set ears, micrognathia), webbing of the neck, cryptorchidism, and a susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia and/or rhabdomyolysis due to intensive physical strain, viral infection or statin use.
Myosin storage myopathy
MedGen UID:
374868
Concept ID:
C1842160
Disease or Syndrome
Myosin storage myopathy, also known as hyaline body myopathy, is a congenital myopathy characterized by the accumulation of ATPase and antibody positive myosin in hyaline subsarcolemmal bodies in type I muscle fibers. The clinical features are variable, with different patients displaying proximal, scapuloperoneal, or generalized weakness and progressive or nonprogressive courses (summary by Dye et al., 2006).
Myopathy, distal, with early respiratory failure, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
375244
Concept ID:
C1843633
Disease or Syndrome
Coenzyme Q10 deficiency
MedGen UID:
334528
Concept ID:
C1843920
Disease or Syndrome
A genetically heterogeneous condition, typically inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion, characterized by coenzyme Q10 deficiency.
Glycogen storage disease IXd
MedGen UID:
335112
Concept ID:
C1845151
Disease or Syndrome
Phosphorylase kinase (PhK) deficiency causing glycogen storage disease type IX (GSD IX) results from deficiency of the enzyme phosphorylase b kinase, which has a major regulatory role in the breakdown of glycogen. The two types of PhK deficiency are liver PhK deficiency (characterized by early childhood onset of hepatomegaly and growth restriction, and often, but not always, fasting ketosis and hypoglycemia) and muscle PhK deficiency, which is considerably rarer (characterized by any of the following: exercise intolerance, myalgia, muscle cramps, myoglobinuria, and progressive muscle weakness). While symptoms and biochemical abnormalities of liver PhK deficiency were thought to improve with age, it is becoming evident that patients need to be monitored for long-term complications such as liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.
Dent disease 2
MedGen UID:
336867
Concept ID:
C1845167
Disease or Syndrome
Dent disease, an X-linked disorder of proximal renal tubular dysfunction, is characterized by low molecular-weight (LMW) proteinuria, hypercalciuria, and at least one additional finding including nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, hematuria, hypophosphatemia, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and evidence of X-linked inheritance. Males younger than age ten years may manifest only LMW proteinuria and/or hypercalciuria, which are usually asymptomatic. Thirty to 80% of affected males develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD) between ages 30 and 50 years; in some instances ESRD does not develop until the sixth decade of life or later. The disease may also be accompanied by rickets or osteomalacia, growth restriction, and short stature. Disease severity can vary within the same family. Males with Dent disease 2 (caused by pathogenic variants in OCRL) may also have mild intellectual disability, cataracts, and/or elevated muscle enzymes. Due to random X-chromosome inactivation, some female carriers may manifest hypercalciuria and, rarely, renal calculi and moderate LMW proteinuria. Females rarely develop CKD.
Uruguay faciocardiomusculoskeletal syndrome
MedGen UID:
335320
Concept ID:
C1846010
Disease or Syndrome
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy, type C5
MedGen UID:
339580
Concept ID:
C1846672
Disease or Syndrome
MDGDC5 is an autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy characterized by variable age at onset, normal cognition, and no structural brain changes (Brockington et al., 2001). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Mercuri et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type C, see MDDGC1 (609308).
CDG2D
MedGen UID:
339615
Concept ID:
C1846816
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy, distal, with anterior tibial onset
MedGen UID:
335706
Concept ID:
C1847532
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (with or without mental retardation) type B5
MedGen UID:
335764
Concept ID:
C1847759
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGB5 is an autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy with mental retardation and structural brain abnormalities (Brockington et al., 2001). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Mercuri et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B, see MDDGB1 (613155).
Myoglobinuria, acute recurrent, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
340308
Concept ID:
C1849386
Disease or Syndrome
Recurrent myoglobinuria is characterized by recurrent attacks of rhabdomyolysis associated with muscle pain and weakness and followed by excretion of myoglobin in the urine. Renal failure may occasionally occur. Onset is usually in early childhood under the age of 5 years. Unlike the exercise-induced rhabdomyolyses such as McArdle syndrome (232600), carnitine palmitoyltransferase deficiency (see 255110), and the Creteil variety of phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency (311800), the attacks in recurrent myoglobinuria no relation to exercise, but are triggered by intercurrent illnesses, commonly upper respiratory tract infections. (Ramesh and Gardner-Medwin, 1992). See 160010 for discussion of a possible autosomal dominant form of myglobinuria. Severe rhabdomyolysis is a major clinical feature of anesthetic-induced malignant hyperthermia (145600), an autosomal dominant disorder.
Retinohepatoendocrinologic syndrome
MedGen UID:
340315
Concept ID:
C1849399
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome that is characterised by total colour blindness caused by progressive cone dystrophy, degenerative liver disease, and endocrine dysfunction (hypothyroidism, diabetes, repeated abortions or infertility). It has been described in six females from two sibships with a high degree of consanguinity, and in a male from another family.
Myosclerosis, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
338098
Concept ID:
C1850671
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy, myosin storage, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
340603
Concept ID:
C1850709
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy with lactic acidosis, hereditary
MedGen UID:
342573
Concept ID:
C1850718
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy with deficiency of ISCU, a mitochondrial myopathy, is classically characterized by lifelong exercise intolerance in which minor exertion causes tachycardia, shortness of breath, fatigue, and pain of active muscles; episodes of more profound exercise intolerance associated with rhabdomyolysis, myoglobinuria, and weakness that may be severe; and typically full recovery of muscle strength between episodes of rhabdomyolysis. Affected individuals usually have near-normal strength; they can have large calves.
Myopathy due to malate-aspartate shuttle defect
MedGen UID:
342579
Concept ID:
C1850744
Disease or Syndrome
Miyoshi muscular dystrophy 1
MedGen UID:
338128
Concept ID:
C1850808
Disease or Syndrome
Dysferlinopathy includes a spectrum of muscle disease characterized by two main phenotypes: Miyoshi myopathy with primarily distal weakness and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) with primarily proximal weakness. Miyoshi myopathy (median age of onset 19 years) is characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy, most marked in the distal parts of the legs, especially the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. Over a period of years, the weakness and atrophy spread to the thighs and gluteal muscles. The forearms may become mildly atrophic with decrease in grip strength; the small muscles of the hands are spared. LGMD2B is characterized by early weakness and atrophy of the pelvic and shoulder girdle muscles in adolescence or young adulthood, with slow progression. Other phenotypes are scapuloperoneal syndrome, distal myopathy with anterior tibial onset, elevated serum CK concentration only, and congenital muscular dystrophy.
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 2B
MedGen UID:
338149
Concept ID:
C1850889
Disease or Syndrome
Dysferlinopathy includes a spectrum of muscle disease characterized by two main phenotypes: Miyoshi myopathy with primarily distal weakness and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) with primarily proximal weakness. Miyoshi myopathy (median age of onset 19 years) is characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy, most marked in the distal parts of the legs, especially the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. Over a period of years, the weakness and atrophy spread to the thighs and gluteal muscles. The forearms may become mildly atrophic with decrease in grip strength; the small muscles of the hands are spared. LGMD2B is characterized by early weakness and atrophy of the pelvic and shoulder girdle muscles in adolescence or young adulthood, with slow progression. Other phenotypes are scapuloperoneal syndrome, distal myopathy with anterior tibial onset, elevated serum CK concentration only, and congenital muscular dystrophy.
Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy
MedGen UID:
339913
Concept ID:
C1853136
Disease or Syndrome
Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy is an autosomal recessive muscle disorder characterized by adult onset of slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs and associated with increased serum creatine kinase; distal muscle weakness may also occur. About half of patients develop cardiomyopathy later in the disease course. Other variable features include diabetes mellitus, hepatic steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and possibly sensorineural hearing loss. Leukocytes and muscle cells show cytoplasmic accumulation of triglycerides (summary by Reilich et al., 2011). Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy belongs to a group of disorders termed neutral lipid storage disorders (NLSDs). These disorders are characterized by the presence of triglyceride-containing cytoplasmic droplets in leukocytes and in other tissues, including bone marrow, skin, and muscle. Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome (CDS; 275630) is defined as NLSD with ichthyosis (NLSDI). Patients with NLSDM present with myopathy but without ichthyosis (summary by Fischer et al., 2007).
Rippling muscle disease
MedGen UID:
342944
Concept ID:
C1853698
Disease or Syndrome
The caveolinopathies, a group of muscle diseases, can be classified into five phenotypes, which can be seen in different members of the same family: Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1C (LGMD1C), characterized by onset usually in the first decade, mild-to-moderate proximal muscle weakness, calf hypertrophy, positive Gower sign, and variable muscle cramps after exercise. Isolated hyperCKemia (i.e., elevated serum concentration of creatine kinase (CK) in the absence of signs of muscle disease) (HCK). Rippling muscle disease (RMD), characterized by signs of increased muscle irritability, such as percussion-induced rapid contraction (PIRC), percussion-induced muscle mounding (PIMM), and/or electrically silent muscle contractions (rippling muscle). Distal myopathy (DM), observed in one individual only Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), without skeletal muscle manifestations.
Spinocerebellar ataxia autosomal recessive 1
MedGen UID:
340052
Concept ID:
C1853761
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) is characterized by onset of ataxia between age three and 30 years after initial normal development, axonal sensorimotor neuropathy, oculomotor apraxia, cerebellar atrophy, and elevated serum concentration of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP).
Dimethylglycine dehydrogenase deficiency
MedGen UID:
343006
Concept ID:
C1853892
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare autosomal recessive glycine metabolism disorder characterised clinically in the single reported case to date by muscle fatigue and a fish-like odour.
Nonaka myopathy
MedGen UID:
381298
Concept ID:
C1853926
Disease or Syndrome
GNE-related myopathy, also known as inclusion body myopathy 2, is characterized by slowly progressive distal muscle weakness that begins in the late teens to early adult years with gait disturbance and foot drop secondary to anterior tibialis muscle weakness. Weakness eventually includes the hand and thigh muscles but commonly spares the quadriceps muscles, even in advanced disease. Affected individuals are usually wheelchair bound about 20 years after onset. If quadriceps sparing is incomplete, loss of ambulation tends to occur earlier.
Erythrocyte lactate transporter defect
MedGen UID:
344529
Concept ID:
C1855577
Disease or Syndrome
A rare metabolic myopathy with characteristics of muscle cramping and/or stiffness after exercise (especially during heat exposure), post-exertional rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria and elevation of serum creatine kinase. Caused by mutation in the SLC16A1 gene.
Cramps, familial adolescent
MedGen UID:
347475
Concept ID:
C1857533
Finding
Muscular dystrophy, congenital, 1b
MedGen UID:
346746
Concept ID:
C1858118
Disease or Syndrome
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 2E
MedGen UID:
347674
Concept ID:
C1858593
Disease or Syndrome
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy is a term for a group of diseases that cause weakness and wasting of the muscles in the arms and legs. The muscles most affected are those closest to the body (proximal muscles), specifically the muscles of the shoulders, upper arms, pelvic area, and thighs.The severity, age of onset, and features of limb-girdle muscle dystrophy vary among the many subtypes of this condition and may be inconsistent even within the same family. Signs and symptoms may first appear at any age and generally worsen with time, although in some cases they remain mild.In the early stages of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, affected individuals may have an unusual walking gait, such as waddling or walking on the balls of their feet, and may also have difficulty running. They may need to use their arms to press themselves up from a squatting position because of their weak thigh muscles. As the condition progresses, people with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy may eventually require wheelchair assistance.Muscle wasting may cause changes in posture or in the appearance of the shoulder, back, and arm. In particular, weak shoulder muscles tend to make the shoulder blades (scapulae) "stick out" from the back, a sign known as scapular winging. Affected individuals may also have an abnormally curved lower back (lordosis) or a spine that curves to the side (scoliosis). Some develop joint stiffness (contractures) that can restrict movement in their hips, knees, ankles, or elbows. Overgrowth (hypertrophy) of the calf muscles occurs in some people with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.Weakening of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy) occurs in some forms of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Some affected individuals experience mild to severe breathing problems related to the weakness of muscles needed for breathing. In some cases, the breathing problems are severe enough that affected individuals need to use a machine to help them breathe (mechanical ventilation).Intelligence is generally unaffected in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy; however, developmental delay and intellectual disability have been reported in rare forms of the disorder.
Tel Hashomer camptodactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
347860
Concept ID:
C1859356
Disease or Syndrome
A rare syndrome with characteristics of camptodactyly, muscle hypoplasia and weakness, skeletal anomalies, facial dysmorphism and abnormal dermatoglyphics. Dysmorphic features include facial asymmetry, hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, long philtrum and a small mouth. Winging scapulae, scoliosis, syndactyly and clinodactyly are commonly observed. The affected patients usually have normal mental development. The molecular basis of the syndrome has not yet been elucidated.
Stormorken syndrome
MedGen UID:
350028
Concept ID:
C1861451
Disease or Syndrome
Stormorken syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mild bleeding tendency due to platelet dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, anemia, asplenia, tubular aggregate myopathy, congenital miosis, and ichthyosis. Additional features may include headache or recurrent stroke-like episodes (summary by Misceo et al., 2014).
Axial osteomalacia
MedGen UID:
354730
Concept ID:
C1862372
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions 4
MedGen UID:
350480
Concept ID:
C1864668
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia-4 is an autosomal dominant form of mitochondrial disease that variably affects skeletal muscle, the nervous system, the liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. Age at onset ranges from infancy to adulthood. The phenotype ranges from relatively mild, with adult-onset skeletal muscle weakness and weakness of the external eye muscles, to severe, with a multisystem disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, lactic acidosis, constipation, and liver involvement (summary by Young et al., 2011). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia, see PEOA1 (157640).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 3
MedGen UID:
355842
Concept ID:
C1864840
Disease or Syndrome
Muscular dystrophy, congenital, megaconial type
MedGen UID:
355943
Concept ID:
C1865233
Disease or Syndrome
Megaconial-type congenital muscular dystrophy is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early-onset muscle wasting and mental retardation. Some patients develop fatal cardiomyopathy. Muscle biopsy shows peculiar enlarged mitochondria that are prevalent toward the periphery of the fibers but are sparse in the center (summary by Mitsuhashi et al., 2011).
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 2G
MedGen UID:
400895
Concept ID:
C1866008
Disease or Syndrome
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy is a term for a group of diseases that cause weakness and wasting of the muscles in the arms and legs. The muscles most affected are those closest to the body (proximal muscles), specifically the muscles of the shoulders, upper arms, pelvic area, and thighs.The severity, age of onset, and features of limb-girdle muscle dystrophy vary among the many subtypes of this condition and may be inconsistent even within the same family. Signs and symptoms may first appear at any age and generally worsen with time, although in some cases they remain mild.In the early stages of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, affected individuals may have an unusual walking gait, such as waddling or walking on the balls of their feet, and may also have difficulty running. They may need to use their arms to press themselves up from a squatting position because of their weak thigh muscles. As the condition progresses, people with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy may eventually require wheelchair assistance.Muscle wasting may cause changes in posture or in the appearance of the shoulder, back, and arm. In particular, weak shoulder muscles tend to make the shoulder blades (scapulae) "stick out" from the back, a sign known as scapular winging. Affected individuals may also have an abnormally curved lower back (lordosis) or a spine that curves to the side (scoliosis). Some develop joint stiffness (contractures) that can restrict movement in their hips, knees, ankles, or elbows. Overgrowth (hypertrophy) of the calf muscles occurs in some people with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.Weakening of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy) occurs in some forms of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Some affected individuals experience mild to severe breathing problems related to the weakness of muscles needed for breathing. In some cases, the breathing problems are severe enough that affected individuals need to use a machine to help them breathe (mechanical ventilation).Intelligence is generally unaffected in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy; however, developmental delay and intellectual disability have been reported in rare forms of the disorder.
Vacuolar neuromyopathy
MedGen UID:
355637
Concept ID:
C1866139
Disease or Syndrome
Spheroid body myopathy
MedGen UID:
401082
Concept ID:
C1866785
Disease or Syndrome
Spheroid body myopathy is a form of myofibrillar myopathy (MFM). Myofibrillar myopathy refers to a genetically heterogeneous group of muscular disorders characterized by a pathologic morphologic pattern of myofibrillar degradation and abnormal accumulation of proteins involved with the sarcomeric Z disc (summary by Foroud et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Familial porencephaly
MedGen UID:
401353
Concept ID:
C1867983
Disease or Syndrome
Familial porencephaly is part of a group of conditions called the COL4A1-related disorders. The conditions in this group have a range of signs and symptoms that involve fragile blood vessels. In familial porencephaly, fluid-filled cysts develop in the brain (porencephaly) during fetal development or soon after birth. These cysts typically occur in only one side of the brain and vary in size. The cysts are thought to be the result of bleeding within the brain (hemorrhagic stroke). People with this condition also have leukoencephalopathy, which is a change in a type of brain tissue called white matter that can be seen with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).During infancy, people with familial porencephaly typically have paralysis affecting one side of the body (infantile hemiplegia). Affected individuals may also have recurrent seizures (epilepsy), migraine headaches, speech problems, intellectual disability, and uncontrolled muscle tensing (dystonia). Some people are severely affected, and others may have no symptoms related to the brain cysts.
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 2A
MedGen UID:
358391
Concept ID:
C1869123
Disease or Syndrome
Calpainopathy is characterized by symmetric and progressive weakness of proximal limb-girdle muscles. The age at onset of muscle weakness ranges from two to 40 years. The phenotype shows intra- and interfamilial variability ranging from severe to mild. Three autosomal recessive calpainopathy phenotypes have been identified based on the distribution of muscle weakness and age at onset: Pelvifemoral limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) (Leyden-Möbius LGMD) phenotype, the most frequently observed calpainopathy phenotype, in which muscle weakness is first evident in the pelvic girdle and later in the shoulder girdle, with onset that may occur as early as before age 12 years or as late as after age 30 years. Scapulohumeral LGMD (Erb LGMD) phenotype, usually a milder phenotype with infrequent early onset, in which muscle weakness is first evident in the shoulder girdle and later in the pelvic girdle. HyperCKemia, usually observed in children or young individuals, in which individuals are asymptomatic and have high serum creatine kinase (CK) concentrations. The autosomal dominant form of calpainopathy shows a variability of clinical phenotype, ranging from almost asymptomatic to wheelchair dependence after age 60 years in few cases with a generally milder phenotype than the recessive form. Clinical findings of calpainopathy include the tendency to walk on tiptoe, difficulty in running, scapular winging, waddling gait, and slight hyperlordosis. Other findings include symmetric weakness of proximal more than distal muscles in the limbs, trunk, and periscapular area; laxity of the abdominal muscles; Achilles tendon shortening; scoliosis; and joint contractures. Affected individuals typically do not have cardiac involvement or intellectual disability.
Mevalonic aciduria
MedGen UID:
368373
Concept ID:
C1959626
Disease or Syndrome
Mevalonic aciduria, the first recognized defect in the biosynthesis of cholesterol and isoprenoids, is a consequence of a deficiency of mevalonate kinase (ATP:mevalonate 5-phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.36). Mevalonic acid accumulates because of failure of conversion to 5-phosphomevalonic acid, which is catalyzed by mevalonate kinase. Mevalonic acid is synthesized from 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA, a reaction catalyzed by HMG-CoA reductase (142910). Mevalonic aciduria is characterized by dysmorphology, psychomotor retardation, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and recurrent febrile crises, usually manifesting in early infancy, accompanied by hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, arthralgia, and skin rash. The febrile crises are similar to those observed in hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and to periodic fever syndrome (HIDS; 260920), which is also caused by mutation in the MVK gene (summary by Prietsch et al., 2003).
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy, type C4
MedGen UID:
370585
Concept ID:
C1969040
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGC4 is an autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy with onset in infancy or early childhood. Cognition and brain structure are usually normal (Godfrey et al., 2006). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Mercuri et al., 2009).
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 2L
MedGen UID:
370102
Concept ID:
C1969785
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of ANO5-related muscle diseases is a continuum that ranges from asymptomatic hyperCKemia and exercise-induced myalgia to proximal and/or distal muscle weakness. The most typical presentation is limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2L (LGMD2L) with late-onset proximal lower-limb weakness (mean onset age 35 years; range 15-70 years). Less common is Miyoshi-like disease or Miyoshi muscular dystrophy 3 with early-adult-onset calf distal myopathy (age 20 to 25 years). Incidental hyperCKemia may be present even earlier. Females have milder disease manifestations than males. Initial symptoms are walking difficulties, reduced sports performance, and difficulties in standing on toes as well as nonspecific exercise myalgia and/or burning sensation in the calf muscles. Muscle weakness and atrophy are frequently asymmetric. Bulbar or respiratory symptoms have not been reported. Disease progression is slow in both the LGMD and distal forms; ambulation is preserved until very late in the disease course.
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2H
MedGen UID:
409971
Concept ID:
C1970021
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with characteristics of severe psychomotor retardation, failure to thrive and intolerance to wheat and dairy products. So far, only two cases have been described. The disease is caused by mutations in the COG8 gene, which encodes a subunit of the COG complex. This complex is involved vesicle transport in the Golgi apparatus.
Mental retardation, autosomal recessive 5
MedGen UID:
370849
Concept ID:
C1970199
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy, early-onset, with fatal cardiomyopathy
MedGen UID:
435983
Concept ID:
C2673677
Disease or Syndrome
Salih myopathy is characterized by muscle weakness (manifest during the neonatal period or in early infancy) and delayed motor development; children acquire independent walking between ages 20 months and four years. In the first decade of life, global motor performance is stable or tends to improve. Moderate joint and neck contractures and spinal rigidity may manifest in the first decade but become more obvious in the second decade. Scoliosis develops after age 11 years. Cardiac dysfunction manifests between ages five and 16 years, progresses rapidly, and leads to death between ages eight and 20 years, usually from heart rhythm disturbances.
Myopathy, Reducing Body, X-Linked, Childhood-Onset
MedGen UID:
394710
Concept ID:
C2678015
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy, Reducing Body, X-Linked, Early-Onset, Severe
MedGen UID:
394714
Concept ID:
C2678027
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy with postural muscle atrophy, X-linked
MedGen UID:
395525
Concept ID:
C2678055
Disease or Syndrome
Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is characterized by the clinical triad of joint contractures that begin in early childhood, slowly progressive muscle weakness and wasting initially in a humero-peroneal distribution that later extends to the scapular and pelvic girdle muscles, and cardiac involvement that may manifest as palpitations, presyncope and syncope, poor exercise tolerance, and congestive heart failure. Age of onset, severity, and progression of muscle and cardiac involvement demonstrate both inter- and intrafamilial variability. Clinical variability ranges from early onset with severe presentation in childhood to late onset with slow progression in adulthood. In general, joint contractures appear during the first two decades, followed by muscle weakness and wasting. Cardiac involvement usually occurs after the second decade.
Scapuloperoneal myopathy, X-linked dominant
MedGen UID:
395530
Concept ID:
C2678061
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 5 (encephalomyopathic with or without methylmalonic aciduria)
MedGen UID:
413170
Concept ID:
C2749864
Disease or Syndrome
SUCLA2-related mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome, encephalomyopathic form with methylmalonic aciduria is characterized by onset of the following features in infancy or childhood (median age of onset 2 months; range of onset birth to 6 years): psychomotor retardation, hypotonia, dystonia, muscular atrophy, sensorineural hearing impairment, postnatal growth retardation, and feeding difficulties. Other, less frequent, features include distinctive facial features, contractures, kyphoscoliosis, gastroesophageal reflux, ptosis, choreoathetosis, ophthalmoplegia, and epilepsy (infantile spasms or generalized convulsions). The median survival is 20 years; approximately 30% of affected individuals succumb during childhood. Affected individuals may have hyperintensities in the basal ganglia, cerebral atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy on head MRI. Elevation of methylmalonic acid (MMA) in the urine and plasma is found in a vast majority of affected individuals, although at levels that are far below those typically seen in individuals with classic methylmalonic aciduria.
Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy 3, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
413212
Concept ID:
C2750035
Disease or Syndrome
Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy is characterized classically by the triad of weakness of the shoulder and pelvic girdle muscles, contractures of the elbows, neck, and Achilles tendon, and cardiac involvement, most commonly arrhythmias (summary by Jimenez-Escrig et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of EDMD, see 310300.
Lipodystrophy, congenital generalized, type 4
MedGen UID:
412871
Concept ID:
C2750069
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 4 combines the phenotype of classic Berardinelli-Seip lipodystrophy (608594) with muscular dystrophy and cardiac conduction anomalies (Hayashi et al., 2009). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital generalized lipodystrophy, see CGL1 (608594).
Miyoshi muscular dystrophy 3
MedGen UID:
413750
Concept ID:
C2750076
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of ANO5-related muscle diseases is a continuum that ranges from asymptomatic hyperCKemia and exercise-induced myalgia to proximal and/or distal muscle weakness. The most typical presentation is limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2L (LGMD2L) with late-onset proximal lower-limb weakness (mean onset age 35 years; range 15-70 years). Less common is Miyoshi-like disease or Miyoshi muscular dystrophy 3 with early-adult-onset calf distal myopathy (age 20 to 25 years). Incidental hyperCKemia may be present even earlier. Females have milder disease manifestations than males. Initial symptoms are walking difficulties, reduced sports performance, and difficulties in standing on toes as well as nonspecific exercise myalgia and/or burning sensation in the calf muscles. Muscle weakness and atrophy are frequently asymmetric. Bulbar or respiratory symptoms have not been reported. Disease progression is slow in both the LGMD and distal forms; ambulation is preserved until very late in the disease course.
Congenital muscular dystrophy, LMNA-related
MedGen UID:
413043
Concept ID:
C2750785
Disease or Syndrome
LMNA-related congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD) is a condition that primarily affects muscles used for movement (skeletal muscles). It is part of a group of genetic conditions called congenital muscular dystrophies, which cause weak muscle tone (hypotonia) and muscle wasting (atrophy) beginning very early in life.In people with L-CMD, muscle weakness becomes apparent in infancy or early childhood and can worsen quickly. The most severely affected infants develop few motor skills, and they are never able to hold up their heads, roll over, or sit. Less severely affected children may learn to sit, stand, and walk before muscle weakness becomes apparent. First the neck muscles weaken, causing the head to fall forward (dropped-head syndrome). As other skeletal muscles become weaker, these children may ultimately lose the ability to sit, stand, and walk unassisted.Other features of L-CMD often include spinal rigidity and abnormal curvature of the spine (scoliosis and lordosis); joint deformities (contractures) that restrict movement, particularly in the hips and legs; and an inward-turning foot. People with L-CMD also have an increased risk of heart rhythm abnormalities (arrhythmias).Over time, muscle weakness causes most infants and children with L-CMD to have trouble eating and breathing. The breathing problems result from restrictive respiratory insufficiency, which occurs when muscles in the chest are weakened and the ribcage becomes increasingly rigid. This problem can be life-threatening, and many affected children require support with a machine to help them breathe (mechanical ventilation).
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy without mental retardation, type B4
MedGen UID:
413465
Concept ID:
C2751052
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGB4 is a rare autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy that is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies.' In contrast to most dystroglycanopathies, mental retardation is not a feature of MDDGB4 (Godfrey et al., 2007). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B, see MDDGB1 (613155).
Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy 5, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
414111
Concept ID:
C2751805
Disease or Syndrome
Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy 4, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
414476
Concept ID:
C2751807
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy, BAG3-related
MedGen UID:
414119
Concept ID:
C2751831
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy-6 is an autosomal dominant severe neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset in the first decade of rapidly progressive generalized and proximal muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, cardiomyopathy, and skeletal deformities related to muscle weakness. Muscle biopsy shows fiber-type grouping, disruption of the Z lines, and filamentous inclusions, and sural nerve biopsy shows a neuropathy, often with giant axonal neurons. Most patients are severely affected by the second decade and need cardiac transplant, ventilation, and/or a wheelchair (summary by Jaffer et al., 2012). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy (MFM), see MFM1 (601419).
Parkinson disease 14
MedGen UID:
414488
Concept ID:
C2751842
Disease or Syndrome
Parkinsonism refers to all clinical states characterized by tremor, muscle rigidity, slowed movement (bradykinesia) and often postural instability. Parkinson disease is the primary and most common form of parkinsonism. Psychiatric manifestations, which include depression and visual hallucinations, are common but not uniformly present. Dementia eventually occurs in at least 20% of cases. The most common sporadic form of Parkinson disease manifests around age 60; however, young-onset and even juvenile presentations are seen.
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1O
MedGen UID:
414534
Concept ID:
C2752007
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1t
MedGen UID:
414536
Concept ID:
C2752015
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type It (CDG1T) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations and severity. The most common features include cleft lip and bifid uvula, apparent at birth, followed by hepatopathy, intermittent hypoglycemia, short stature, and exercise intolerance, often accompanied by increased serum creatine kinase. Less common features include rhabdomyolysis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (summary by Tegtmeyer et al., 2014). For a discussion of the classification of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065).
Glycogen storage disease type 13
MedGen UID:
442873
Concept ID:
C2752027
Disease or Syndrome
Malignant hyperpyrexia susceptibility type 3
MedGen UID:
418956
Concept ID:
C2930982
Pathologic Function
Myopathy, autophagic vacuolar, infantile-onset
MedGen UID:
419364
Concept ID:
C2931230
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile-onset autophagic vacuolar myopathy is characterized by increased cardiac and skeletal muscle glycogen with normal acid maltase (GAA; 606800). Skeletal muscle biopsy shows characteristic intracytoplasmic vacuoles that stain for sarcolemmal proteins and complement proteins. Similar pathologic findings are seen in Danon disease (300257), caused by mutation in the LAMP2 gene (309060) on chromosome Xq24, and X-linked myopathy with excessive autophagy (XMEA; 310440), which has been mapped to Xq28.
Myotonic dystrophy type 2
MedGen UID:
419137
Concept ID:
C2931689
Disease or Syndrome
Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is characterized by myotonia (90% of affected individuals) and muscle dysfunction (weakness, pain, and stiffness) (82%), and less commonly by cardiac conduction defects, iridescent posterior subcapsular cataracts, insulin-insensitive type 2 diabetes mellitus, and testicular failure. Although myotonia (involuntary muscle contraction with delayed relaxation) has been reported during the first decade, onset is typically in the third decade, most commonly with fluctuating or episodic muscle pain that can be debilitating and weakness of the neck flexors and finger flexors. Subsequently, weakness occurs in the elbow extensors and the hip flexors and extensors. Facial weakness and weakness of the ankle dorsiflexors are less common. Myotonia rarely causes severe symptoms.
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 2D
MedGen UID:
424706
Concept ID:
C2936332
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-3 affects mainly the proximal muscles and results in difficulty walking. Most individuals have onset in childhood; the disorder is progressive. Other features may include scapular winging, calf pseudohypertrophy, and contractures. Cardiomyopathy has rarely been reported (summary by Babameto-Laku et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600).
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 1E
MedGen UID:
460114
Concept ID:
C3148763
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy is characterized by proximal and/or distal muscle weakness and atrophy. The age at onset is variable and can range from the first to the sixth decade, although later onset is less common. Most patients present with proximal muscle weakness that progresses to distal involvement, but some can present with distal impairment. The severity is variable: patients with a more severe phenotype can lose ambulation after several decades and have facial weakness with bulbar and respiratory involvement. Muscle biopsy shows dystrophic changes with protein aggregates, myofibrillar degeneration, and rimmed vacuoles (summary by Ruggieri et al., 2015). Genetic Heterogeneity of Autosomal Dominant Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Other forms of autosomal dominant LGMD include LGMDD2 (608423), previously LGMD1F, caused by mutation in the TNPO3 gene (610032) on chromosome 7q32; LGMDD3 (609115), previously LGMD1G, caused by mutation in the HNRNPDL gene (607137) on chromosome 4q21; and LGMDD4 (618129), previously LGMD1I, caused by mutation in the CAPN3 gene (114240) on chromosome 15q15. For a discussion of autosomal recessive LGMD, see 253600.
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
461100
Concept ID:
C3149750
Disease or Syndrome
TK2-related mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance defect is a phenotypic continuum that ranges from severe to mild. To date, approximately 107 individuals with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis have been reported. Three main subtypes of presentation have been described: Infantile-onset myopathy with neurologic involvement and rapid progression to early death. Affected individuals experience progressive muscle weakness leading to respiratory failure. Some individuals develop dysarthria, dysphagia, and/or hearing loss. Cognitive function is typically spared. Juvenile/childhood onset with generalized proximal weakness and survival to at least 13 years. Late-/adult-onset myopathy with facial and limb weakness and mtDNA deletions. Some affected individuals develop respiratory insufficiency, chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, dysphagia, and dysarthria.
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies, type A2
MedGen UID:
461761
Concept ID:
C3150411
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A), which includes both the more severe Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and the slightly less severe muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, congenital muscular dystrophy, and death usually in the first years of life. It represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of DAG1 (128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (van Reeuwijk et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with mental retardation, type B3
MedGen UID:
461762
Concept ID:
C3150412
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGB3 is an autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy with mental retardation and mild brain abnormalities (Clement et al., 2008). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Mercuri et al., 2009). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B, see MDDGB1 (613155).
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies type A5
MedGen UID:
461763
Concept ID:
C3150413
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A), which includes both the more severe Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and the slightly less severe muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, congenital muscular dystrophy, and death usually in the first years of life. It represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of DAG1 (128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Beltran-Valero de Bernabe et al., 2004). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies, type A6
MedGen UID:
461764
Concept ID:
C3150414
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A), which includes both the more severe Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and the slightly less severe muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, congenital muscular dystrophy, and death usually in the first years of life. It represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of DAG1 (128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Godfrey et al., 2007). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with mental retardation, type B1
MedGen UID:
461765
Concept ID:
C3150415
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophies resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239) are characterized by early onset of muscle weakness, usually before ambulation is achieved; mental retardation and mild brain anomalies are variable (Balci et al., 2005; Godfrey et al., 2007). Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathies with or without mental retardation (type B) represent the intermediate range of the spectrum of dystroglycanopathies. They are less severe than muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A; see MDDGA1, 236670), previously designated Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) or muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), and more severe than limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (type C; see MDDGC1, 609308). Genetic Heterogeneity of Congenital Muscular Dystrophy-Dystroglycanopathy with or without Mental Retardation (Type B) Congenital muscular dystrophy with mental retardation due to defective glycosylation of DAG1 is genetically heterogeneous. See also MDDGB2 (613156), caused by mutation in the POMT2 gene (607439); MDDGB3 (613151), caused by mutation in the POMGNT1 gene (606822); MDDGB4 (613152), caused by mutation in the FKTN gene (607440); MDDGB5 (616612), caused by mutation in the FKRP gene (606596); MDDGB6 (608840), caused by mutation in the LARGE gene (603590); and MDDGB14 (615351), caused by mutation in the GMPPB gene (615320).
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with mental retardation, type B2
MedGen UID:
461766
Concept ID:
C3150416
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGB2 is an autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy associated with mental retardation and mild structural brain abnormalities (Yanagisawa et al., 2007). It is part of a group of similar disorders, collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies,' resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239) (Godfrey et al., 2007). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B, see MDDGB1 (613155).
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy, type C3
MedGen UID:
461767
Concept ID:
C3150417
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGC3 is a rare form of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy with normal cognition (Clement et al., 2008). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Godfrey et al., 2007). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type C, see MDDGC1 (609308).
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy, type C2
MedGen UID:
461768
Concept ID:
C3150418
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGC2 is an autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy with onset after ambulation is achieved. Cognition is normal (Biancheri et al., 2007). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Godfrey et al., 2007). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type C, see MDDGC1 (609308).
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 1H
MedGen UID:
462136
Concept ID:
C3150786
Disease or Syndrome
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1H (LGMD1H) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by adult onset of progressive proximal muscle weakness affecting both the upper and lower limbs (Bisceglia et al., 2010). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDD1 (603511).
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 2Q
MedGen UID:
462339
Concept ID:
C3150989
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-17 is characterized by early childhood onset of proximal muscle weakness and atrophy without skin involvement. One family has shown rapid progression of the disorder in adolescence (summary by Gundesli et al., 2010). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600).
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy, type C9
MedGen UID:
462534
Concept ID:
C3151184
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGC9 is an autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy showing onset in early childhood. It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of DAG1, collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (summary by Hara et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type C, see MDDGC1 (609308).
Fatal infantile hypertonic myofibrillar myopathy
MedGen UID:
462586
Concept ID:
C3151236
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy is characterized by slowly progressive weakness that can involve both proximal and distal muscles. Distal muscle weakness is present in about 80% of individuals and is more pronounced than proximal weakness in about 25%. A minority of individuals experience sensory symptoms, muscle stiffness, aching, or cramps. Peripheral neuropathy is present in about 20% of affected individuals. Overt cardiomyopathy is present in 15%-30%.
Mitochondrial myopathy, infantile, transient
MedGen UID:
463248
Concept ID:
C3151898
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile mitochondrial myopathy due to reversible COX deficiency is a rare mitochondrial disorder characterized by onset in infancy of severe hypotonia and generalized muscle weakness associated with lactic acidosis, but is distinguished from other mitochondrial disorders in that affected individuals recover spontaneously after 1 year of age (summary by Mimaki et al., 2010). See also transient infantile liver failure (LFIT; 613070), which is a similar disorder.
Epilepsy, progressive myoclonic 6
MedGen UID:
481257
Concept ID:
C3279627
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy-6 is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of ataxia in the first years of life, followed by action myoclonus and seizures later in childhood, and loss of independent ambulation in the second decade. Cognition is not usually affected, although mild memory difficulties may occur in the third decade (summary by Corbett et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of progressive myoclonic epilepsy, see EPM1A (254800).
Distal myopathy, Tateyama type
MedGen UID:
482073
Concept ID:
C3280443
Disease or Syndrome
The caveolinopathies, a group of muscle diseases, can be classified into five phenotypes, which can be seen in different members of the same family: Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1C (LGMD1C), characterized by onset usually in the first decade, mild-to-moderate proximal muscle weakness, calf hypertrophy, positive Gower sign, and variable muscle cramps after exercise. Isolated hyperCKemia (i.e., elevated serum concentration of creatine kinase (CK) in the absence of signs of muscle disease) (HCK). Rippling muscle disease (RMD), characterized by signs of increased muscle irritability, such as percussion-induced rapid contraction (PIRC), percussion-induced muscle mounding (PIMM), and/or electrically silent muscle contractions (rippling muscle). Distal myopathy (DM), observed in one individual only Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), without skeletal muscle manifestations.
Myopathy, centronuclear, 3
MedGen UID:
482333
Concept ID:
C3280703
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies, type A7
MedGen UID:
766244
Concept ID:
C3553330
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A), which includes both the more severe Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and the slightly less severe muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, congenital muscular dystrophy, and death usually in the first years of life. It represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (summary by Roscioli et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2k
MedGen UID:
766485
Concept ID:
C3553571
Disease or Syndrome
CDG2K is an autosomal recessive disorder with a variable phenotype. Affected individuals show psychomotor retardation and growth retardation, and most have short stature. Other features include dysmorphism, hypotonia, eye abnormalities, acquired microcephaly, hepatomegaly, and skeletal dysplasia. Serum transferrin analysis shows a CDG type II pattern (summary by Foulquier et al., 2012). For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065) and CDG2A (212066).
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1u
MedGen UID:
767299
Concept ID:
C3554385
Disease or Syndrome
Spinal muscular atrophy, jokela type
MedGen UID:
767312
Concept ID:
C3554398
Disease or Syndrome
CHCHD10-related disorders are characterized by a spectrum of adult-onset neurologic findings that can include: Mitochondrial myopathy (may also be early-onset): weakness, amyotrophy, exercise intolerance. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): progressive degeneration of upper motor neurons (UMNs) and lower motor neurons (LMNs). Frontotemporal dementia (FTD): slowly progressive behavioral changes, language disturbances, cognitive decline, extrapyramidal signs. Late-onset spinal motor neuronopathy (SMAJ): weakness, cramps, and/or fasciculations; areflexia. Cerebellar ataxia: gait ataxia, kinetic ataxia (progressive loss of coordination of lower- and upper-limb movements), dysarthria/dysphagia, nystagmus, cerebellar oculomotor disorder. Because of the recent discovery of CHCHD10-related disorders and the limited number of affected individuals reported to date, the natural history of these disorders (except for SMAJ caused by the p.Gly66Val pathogenic variant) is largely unknown.
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal dominant 6
MedGen UID:
767513
Concept ID:
C3554599
Disease or Syndrome
PEOA6 is characterized by muscle weakness, mainly affecting the lower limbs, external ophthalmoplegia, exercise intolerance, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions on muscle biopsy. Symptoms may appear in childhood or adulthood and show slow progression (summary by Ronchi et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia, see PEOA1 (157640).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type a, 11
MedGen UID:
767552
Concept ID:
C3554638
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A) is an autosomal recessive disorder with congenital muscular dystrophy resulting in muscle weakness early in life and brain and eye anomalies. It is usually associated with delayed psychomotor development and shortened life expectancy. The phenotype includes the alternative clinical designations Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB). The disorder represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (summary by Stevens et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (limb-girdle), type c, 14
MedGen UID:
811507
Concept ID:
C3714932
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGC14 is an autosomal recessive form of muscular dystrophy characterized by onset in early childhood of mild proximal muscle weakness. Some patients may have additional features, such as mild intellectual disability or seizures. It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (summary by Carss et al., 2013). Some patients with GMPPB mutations may show features consistent with a congenital myasthenic syndrome (see, e.g., CMS1A; 601462), such as fatigability and decremental compound muscle action potential response to repetitive nerve stimulation; these patients may show a positive therapeutic response to treatment with pyridostigmine (Belaya et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type C, see MDDGC1 (609308).
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 21
MedGen UID:
813851
Concept ID:
C3807521
Disease or Syndrome
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-21 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder affecting upper and lower motor neurons, resulting in muscle weakness and respiratory failure. Some patients may develop myopathic features or dementia (summary by Johnson et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, see ALS1 (105400).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type a, 12
MedGen UID:
815294
Concept ID:
C3808964
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A) is an autosomal recessive disorder with congenital muscular dystrophy resulting in muscle weakness early in life and brain and eye anomalies. It is usually associated with delayed psychomotor development and shortened life expectancy. The phenotype includes the alternative clinical designations Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB). The disorder represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as dystroglycanopathies (summary by Stevens et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type a, 13
MedGen UID:
815372
Concept ID:
C3809042
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A) is a autosomal recessive disorder associated with severe neurologic defects and resulting in early infantile death. The phenotype includes the alternative clinical designations Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB). The disorder represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as dystroglycanopathies (summary by Buysse et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type a, 14
MedGen UID:
815546
Concept ID:
C3809216
Disease or Syndrome
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with mental retardation), type b, 14
MedGen UID:
815551
Concept ID:
C3809221
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGB14 is an autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy characterized by severe muscle weakness apparent in infancy and mental retardation. Some patients may have additional features, such as microcephaly, cardiac dysfunction, seizures, or cerebellar hypoplasia. It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (summary by Carss et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B, see MDDGB1 (613155).
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 2S
MedGen UID:
815566
Concept ID:
C3809236
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-18 is characterized by childhood-onset of proximal muscle weakness resulting in gait abnormalities and scapular winging. Serum creatine kinase is increased. A subset of patients may show a hyperkinetic movement disorder with chorea, ataxia, or dystonia and global developmental delay (summary by Bogershausen et al., 2013). Additional more variable features include alacrima, achalasia, cataracts, or hepatic steatosis (Liang et al., 2015; Koehler et al., 2017). For discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600).
Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
815602
Concept ID:
C3809272
Disease or Syndrome
Inclusion body myopathy with early-onset paget disease with or without frontotemporal dementia 2
MedGen UID:
815798
Concept ID:
C3809468
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy with extrapyramidal signs
MedGen UID:
816615
Concept ID:
C3810285
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy with extrapyramidal signs is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early childhood onset of proximal muscle weakness and learning disabilities. While the muscle weakness is static, most patients develop progressive extrapyramidal signs that may become disabling (summary by Logan et al., 2014).
Poikiloderma, hereditary fibrosing, with tendon contractures, myopathy, and pulmonary fibrosis
MedGen UID:
816655
Concept ID:
C3810325
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary fibrosing poikiloderma with tendon contractures, myopathy, and pulmonary fibrosis (POIKTMP) is characterized by the skin findings of poikiloderma (typically beginning in the first six months and mainly localized to the face), hypohidrosis with heat intolerance, mild lymphedema of the extremities, chronic erythematous and scaly skin lesions on the extremities, sclerosis of the digits, and mild palmoplantar keratoderma. Scalp hair, eyelashes, and/or eyebrows are typically sparse. Muscle contractures are usually seen in childhood and can be present as early as age two years. The majority of affected individuals develop progressive weakness of the proximal and distal muscles of all four limbs. Some adults develop progressive interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, which can be life-threatening within three to four years after respiratory symptoms appear. Other features are exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, liver impairment, hematologic abnormalities, relative short stature, and cataract.
Very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency
MedGen UID:
854382
Concept ID:
C3887523
Disease or Syndrome
Deficiency of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD), which catalyzes the initial step of mitochondrial ß-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids with a chain length of 14 to 20 carbons, is associated with three phenotypes. The severe early-onset cardiac and multiorgan failure form typically presents in the first months of life with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy, pericardial effusion, and arrhythmias, as well as hypotonia, hepatomegaly, and intermittent hypoglycemia. The hepatic or hypoketotic hypoglycemic form typically presents during early childhood with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and hepatomegaly, but without cardiomyopathy. The later-onset episodic myopathic form presents with intermittent rhabdomyolysis provoked by exercise, muscle cramps and/or pain, and/or exercise intolerance. Hypoglycemia typically is not present at the time of symptoms.
Myopathy, tubular aggregate, 2
MedGen UID:
862994
Concept ID:
C4014557
Disease or Syndrome
Polyglucosan body myopathy 1 with or without immunodeficiency
MedGen UID:
863042
Concept ID:
C4014605
Disease or Syndrome
Polyglucosan body myopathy-1 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset in childhood of progressive proximal muscle weakness, resulting in difficulties in ambulation. Most patients also develop progressive dilated cardiomyopathy, which may necessitate cardiac transplant in severe cases. A small subset of patients present with severe immunodeficiency and a hyperinflammatory state in very early childhood (summary by Boisson et al., 2012 and Nilsson et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Polyglucosan Body Myopathy See also PGBM2 (616199), caused by mutation in the GYG1 gene (603942) on chromosome 3q24.
Familial partial lipodystrophy 6
MedGen UID:
863306
Concept ID:
C4014869
Disease or Syndrome
Familial partial lipodystrophy-6 (FPLD6) is characterized by abnormal subcutaneous fat distribution, with variable excess accumulation of fat in the face, neck, shoulders, axillae, back, abdomen, and pubic region, and reduction in subcutaneous fat of the lower extremities. Progressive adult-onset myopathy is seen in some patients, and there is variable association with diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and hepatic steatosis (Zolotov et al., 2017).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (limb-girdle), type c, 7
MedGen UID:
863532
Concept ID:
C4015095
Disease or Syndrome
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (limb-girdle), type c, 12
MedGen UID:
863621
Concept ID:
C4015184
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy, isolated mitochondrial, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
863950
Concept ID:
C4015513
Disease or Syndrome
CHCHD10-related disorders are characterized by a spectrum of adult-onset neurologic findings that can include: Mitochondrial myopathy (may also be early-onset): weakness, amyotrophy, exercise intolerance. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): progressive degeneration of upper motor neurons (UMNs) and lower motor neurons (LMNs). Frontotemporal dementia (FTD): slowly progressive behavioral changes, language disturbances, cognitive decline, extrapyramidal signs. Late-onset spinal motor neuronopathy (SMAJ): weakness, cramps, and/or fasciculations; areflexia. Cerebellar ataxia: gait ataxia, kinetic ataxia (progressive loss of coordination of lower- and upper-limb movements), dysarthria/dysphagia, nystagmus, cerebellar oculomotor disorder. Because of the recent discovery of CHCHD10-related disorders and the limited number of affected individuals reported to date, the natural history of these disorders (except for SMAJ caused by the p.Gly66Val pathogenic variant) is largely unknown.
Myopathy, vacuolar, with casq1 aggregates
MedGen UID:
864061
Concept ID:
C4015624
Disease or Syndrome
Vacuolar myopathy with CASQ1 aggregates is an autosomal dominant mild muscle disorder characterized by adult onset of muscle cramping and weakness as well as increased levels of serum creatine kinase (CK). The disorder is not progressive, and some patients may be asymptomatic (summary by Rossi et al., 2014).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 24
MedGen UID:
864080
Concept ID:
C4015643
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-24 is an autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder with wide phenotypic variability. Some patients have a milder form affecting only skeletal muscle, whereas others may have a more severe infantile-onset neurodegenerative disorder (Vanlander et al., 2015; Sofou et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
TANGO2-Related Metabolic Encephalopathy and Arrhythmias
MedGen UID:
894196
Concept ID:
C4225171
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with TANGO2-related metabolic encephalopathy and arrhythmias can present in acute metabolic crisis (hypoglycemia, elevated lactate, mild hyperammonemia) or with developmental delay, regression, and/or seizures. The acute presentation varies from profound muscle weakness, ataxia, and/or disorientation to a comatose state. Individuals can present with intermittent acute episodes of rhabdomyolysis. The first episode of myoglobinuria has been known to occur as early as age five months. Acute renal tubular damage due to myoglobinuria can result in acute kidney injury and renal failure. During acute illness, transient electrocardiogram changes can be seen; the most common is QT prolongation. Life-threatening recurrent ventricular tachycardia or torsade de pointes occurs primarily during times of acute illness. Individuals who do not present in metabolic crises may present with gait incoordination, progressively unsteady gait, difficulty with speech, or clumsiness. Intellectual disability of variable severity is observed in almost all individuals. Seizures are observed outside the periods of crises in more than 75% of individuals. Hypothyroidism has been reported in more than one third of individuals.
CONGENITAL DISORDER OF GLYCOSYLATION, TYPE IIo
MedGen UID:
906792
Concept ID:
C4225191
Congenital Abnormality
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIo (CDG2O) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by infantile onset of progressive liver failure, hypotonia, and delayed psychomotor development. Laboratory abnormalities include elevated liver enzymes, coagulation factor deficiencies, hypercholesterolemia, and low ceruloplasmin. Serum isoelectric focusing of proteins shows a combined defect of N- and O-glycosylation, suggestive of a Golgi defect (summary by Jansen et al., 2016). For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065).
Muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle, type 2W
MedGen UID:
897675
Concept ID:
C4225192
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy with cardiomyopathy and triangular tongue (MDRCMTT) is an autosomal recessive muscle disorder characterized by onset of severe and progressive muscle weakness and atrophy in childhood, resulting in loss of independent ambulation. Patients may also have dilated cardiomyopathy and have macroglossia with a small tip, resulting in a triangular appearance of the tongue (summary by Warman Chardon et al., 2015).
Muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle, type 2X
MedGen UID:
901135
Concept ID:
C4225199
Disease or Syndrome
Cardiac arrhythmia with increased serum creatine kinase (CARICK) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by syncopal episodes due to second-degree atrioventricular (AV) block necessitating pacemaker implantation. The disorder becomes apparent in the teenage or adult years. Affected individuals also have markedly increased serum creatine kinase, which can increase further after strenuous exercise. Some patients may develop late-onset proximal muscle weakness associated with dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy (summary by Schindler et al., 2016).
Hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
906509
Concept ID:
C4225201
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation syndrome-6 (HPMRS6) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by global developmental delay, dysmorphic features, seizures, and congenital cataracts. Severity is variable, and the disorder may show a range of phenotypic and biochemical abnormalities, including increased serum alkaline phosphatase levels (summary by Ilkovski et al., 2015). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HPMRS, see HPMRS1 (239300). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, type 2y
MedGen UID:
898987
Concept ID:
C4225244
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2Y is an autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy characterized by distal muscle weakness and atrophy associated with length-dependent sensory loss. Most patients have involvement of both the lower and upper limbs. The age at onset and the severity of the disorder are highly variable (summary by Gonzalez et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type a, 9
MedGen UID:
902513
Concept ID:
C4225291
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A) is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, and congenital muscular dystrophy. The phenotype includes the alternative clinical designation Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), which is associated with death in infancy. The disorder represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (summary by Geis et al., 2013 and Riemersma et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 2
MedGen UID:
901897
Concept ID:
C4225312
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions-2 is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by adult onset of progressive external ophthalmoplegia, exercise intolerance, muscle weakness, and signs and symptoms of spinocerebellar ataxia, such as impaired gait and dysarthria. Some patients may have respiratory insufficiency. Laboratory studies are consistent with a defect in mtDNA replication (summary by Reyes et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive PEO, see PEOB1 (258450).
Myopathy, myofibrillar, 8
MedGen UID:
934612
Concept ID:
C4310645
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy-8 is an autosomal recessive myopathy characterized by childhood onset of slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness and atrophy resulting in increased falls, gait problems, and difficulty running or climbing stairs. Upper and lower limbs are affected, and some individuals develop distal muscle weakness and atrophy. Ambulation is generally preserved, and patients do not have significant respiratory compromise. Muscle biopsy shows a mix of myopathic features, including myofibrillar inclusions and sarcomeric disorganization (summary by O'Grady et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Lissencephaly 8
MedGen UID:
934613
Concept ID:
C4310646
Disease or Syndrome
Lissencephaly-8 is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability with poor or absent speech, early-onset refractory seizures, and hypotonia. Brain imaging shows variable features, including cortical gyral abnormalities and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, brainstem, and cerebellum (summary by Jerber et al., 2016). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity lissencephaly, see LIS1 (607432).
Muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle, type 2z
MedGen UID:
934627
Concept ID:
C4310660
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-21 (LGMDR21) is characterized by young-adult onset of slowly progressive proximal upper and lower limb muscle weakness and atrophy (summary by Servian-Morilla et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive LGMD, see LGMDR1 (253600).
Myopathy, myofibrillar, 7
MedGen UID:
934678
Concept ID:
C4310711
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy-7 is an autosomal recessive muscle disorder characterized by early childhood onset of slowly progressive muscle weakness primary affecting the lower limbs and associated with joint contractures (summary by Straussberg et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle, type 2y
MedGen UID:
934698
Concept ID:
C4310731
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive myopathy with rigid spine and distal joint contractures (MRRSDC) is characterized by onset of slowly progressive muscle weakness in the first or second decades of life. There is initial involvement of the proximal lower limbs, followed by distal upper and lower limb muscle weakness and atrophy. Other features include joint contractures, rigid spine, and restricted pulmonary function; some patients may have mild cardiac involvement (summary by Kayman-Kurekci et al., 2014).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 4
MedGen UID:
934700
Concept ID:
C4310733
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions-4 (PEOB4) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by adult onset of eye muscle weakness and proximal limb muscle weakness associated with deletions of mtDNA on skeletal muscle biopsy, which results from defective mtDNA replication in post-mitotic muscle tissue. Additional features are more variable (summary by Ronchi et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive PEO, see PEOB1 (258450).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 3
MedGen UID:
934701
Concept ID:
C4310734
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, type 2CC
MedGen UID:
934757
Concept ID:
C4310790
Disease or Syndrome
Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2CC is an autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy that predominantly affects the lower limbs, resulting in muscle weakness and atrophy and gait impairment. Other features include distal sensory impairment and less severe involvement of the upper limbs. The age at onset and severity are variable (summary by Rebelo et al., 2016). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT type 2, see CMT2A (118210).
Lipid storage myopathy due to flavin adenine dinucleotide synthetase deficiency
MedGen UID:
934789
Concept ID:
C4310822
Disease or Syndrome
Lipid storage myopathy due to FLAD1 deficiency is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism that includes variable mitochondrial dysfunction. The phenotype is extremely heterogeneous: some patients have a severe disorder with onset in infancy and cardiac and respiratory insufficiency resulting in early death, whereas others have a milder course with onset of muscle weakness in adulthood. Some patients show significant improvement with riboflavin treatment (summary by Olsen et al., 2016).
Epileptic encephalopathy, early infantile, 53
MedGen UID:
1374886
Concept ID:
C4479313
Disease or Syndrome
Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy-53 is a severe neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of intractable seizures in infancy. Affected individuals show hypotonia and very poor or absent global development, resulting in severe intellectual disability and spastic quadriplegia. Some patients may die in childhood (summary by Hardies et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of EIEE, see EIEE1 (308350).
Muscular dystrophy, congenital, with cataracts and intellectual disability
MedGen UID:
1382291
Concept ID:
C4479410
Disease or Syndrome
MDCCAID is an autosomal recessive form of muscular dystrophy with onset of progressive muscle weakness in early childhood. Almost all patients also have early-onset cataracts, most have intellectual disability of varying severity, and some have seizures (summary by Wiessner et al., 2017 and Osborn et al., 2017).

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Zimowski JG, Pilch J, Pawelec M, Purzycka JK, Kubalska J, Ziora-Jakutowicz K, Dudzińska M, Zaremba J
J Appl Genet 2017 Aug;58(3):343-347. Epub 2017 Feb 28 doi: 10.1007/s13353-017-0391-8. PMID: 28247318Free PMC Article
Chartrand S, Swigris JJ, Peykova L, Chung J, Fischer A
J Rheumatol 2016 May;43(5):887-92. Epub 2016 Mar 1 doi: 10.3899/jrheum.150966. PMID: 26932342
Sowards KJ, Mukherjee K, Norris PR, Shintani A, Ware LB, Roberts LJ 2nd, May AK
Injury 2014 Dec;45(12):2096-100. doi: 10.1016/j.injury.2014.09.009. PMID: 25441175Free PMC Article
Lee JW
J Clin Psychopharmacol 2010 Feb;30(1):3-10. doi: 10.1097/JCP.0b013e3181c9bfe6. PMID: 20075641
Marsh WL, Marsh NJ, Moore A, Symmans WA, Johnson CL, Redman CM
Vox Sang 1981;40(6):403-11. PMID: 7197431

Diagnosis

Ohi K, Kuwata A, Shimada T, Yasuyama T, Nitta Y, Uehara T, Kawasaki Y
Medicine (Baltimore) 2017 Apr;96(16):e6566. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000006566. PMID: 28422845Free PMC Article
Chartrand S, Swigris JJ, Peykova L, Chung J, Fischer A
J Rheumatol 2016 May;43(5):887-92. Epub 2016 Mar 1 doi: 10.3899/jrheum.150966. PMID: 26932342
Christodoulou C, Margaritis D, Makris G, Kavatha D, Efstathiou V, Papageorgiou C, Douzenis A
Clin Neuropharmacol 2015 Jan-Feb;38(1):36-7. doi: 10.1097/WNF.0000000000000060. PMID: 25580921
Sowards KJ, Mukherjee K, Norris PR, Shintani A, Ware LB, Roberts LJ 2nd, May AK
Injury 2014 Dec;45(12):2096-100. doi: 10.1016/j.injury.2014.09.009. PMID: 25441175Free PMC Article
Adityanjee
Br J Psychiatry 1991 May;158:706-7. PMID: 1677602

Therapy

Sowards KJ, Mukherjee K, Norris PR, Shintani A, Ware LB, Roberts LJ 2nd, May AK
Injury 2014 Dec;45(12):2096-100. doi: 10.1016/j.injury.2014.09.009. PMID: 25441175Free PMC Article
Imai Y, Watanabe N, Hashimoto J, Nishiyama A, Sakuma H, Sekino H, Omata K, Abe K
Eur J Clin Pharmacol 1995;48(1):29-34. PMID: 7621844
Adityanjee
Br J Psychiatry 1991 May;158:706-7. PMID: 1677602
Kirubakaran V
Psychiatr J Univ Ott 1986 Jun;11(2):105-6. PMID: 3526374
Zsigmond EK, Starkweather WH, Duboff GS, Flynn K
Anesth Analg 1972 Mar-Apr;51(2):220-5. PMID: 5062123

Prognosis

Ohi K, Kuwata A, Shimada T, Yasuyama T, Nitta Y, Uehara T, Kawasaki Y
Medicine (Baltimore) 2017 Apr;96(16):e6566. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000006566. PMID: 28422845Free PMC Article
Sowards KJ, Mukherjee K, Norris PR, Shintani A, Ware LB, Roberts LJ 2nd, May AK
Injury 2014 Dec;45(12):2096-100. doi: 10.1016/j.injury.2014.09.009. PMID: 25441175Free PMC Article
Hartung B, Merk HF, Huckenbeck W, Daldrup T, Neuen-Jacob E, Ritz-Timme S
Int J Legal Med 2012 Nov;126(6):953-6. Epub 2012 Aug 16 doi: 10.1007/s00414-012-0750-2. PMID: 22895802
Margetić B, Aukst-Margetić B
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 2010 May;19(5):429-35. doi: 10.1002/pds.1937. PMID: 20306454
Cho SH, Lim HS, Ghim JL, Choe S, Kim UJ, Jung JA, Bae KS
Clin Ther 2009 May;31(5):1046-53. doi: 10.1016/j.clinthera.2009.05.013. PMID: 19539105

Clinical prediction guides

Sowards KJ, Mukherjee K, Norris PR, Shintani A, Ware LB, Roberts LJ 2nd, May AK
Injury 2014 Dec;45(12):2096-100. doi: 10.1016/j.injury.2014.09.009. PMID: 25441175Free PMC Article
Quartier P, Bonnet D, Fournet JC, Bodemer C, Acar P, Ouachée-Chardin M, Le Bidois J, Prieur AM
J Rheumatol 2002 Aug;29(8):1767-73. PMID: 12180742
Manor I, Hermesh H, Valevski A, Benjamin Y, Munitz H, Weizman A
Biol Psychiatry 1998 Feb 15;43(4):288-92. doi: 10.1016/S0006-3223(97)00198-4. PMID: 9513739
Beggs AH, Hoffman EP, Snyder JR, Arahata K, Specht L, Shapiro F, Angelini C, Sugita H, Kunkel LM
Am J Hum Genet 1991 Jul;49(1):54-67. PMID: 2063877Free PMC Article
Fernández F, Verdú A, Quero J, Pérez-Higueras A
Acta Paediatr Scand 1987 Nov;76(6):914-8. PMID: 3425308

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