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Lactic acidosis

MedGen UID:
1717
Concept ID:
C0001125
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Hyperlacticacidemia; Lactic acidemia; Lacticacidemia; Lacticacidosis
SNOMED CT: Lactic acidosis (91273001)
 
HPO: HP:0003128

Definition

Acidosis caused by accumulation of lactic acid more rapidly than it can be metabolized. It may occur spontaneously or in association with diseases such as DIABETES MELLITUS; LEUKEMIA; or LIVER FAILURE. [from MeSH]

Conditions with this feature

Hereditary fructosuria
MedGen UID:
42105
Concept ID:
C0016751
Disease or Syndrome
Following dietary exposure to fructose, sucrose, or sorbitol, untreated hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is characterized by metabolic disturbances (hypoglycemia, lactic acidemia, hypophosphatemia, hyperuricemia, hypermagnesemia, hyperalaninemia) and clinical findings (nausea, vomiting, and abdominal distress; chronic growth restriction/failure to thrive). Untreated HFI typically first manifests when fructose- and sucrose-containing foods are introduced in the course of weaning young infants from breast milk. If large quantities of fructose are ingested, the infant may acutely develop lethargy, seizures, and/or progressive coma. Untreated HFI may result in renal and hepatic failure. If identified and treated before permanent organ injury occurs, individuals with HFI can experience a normal quality of life and life expectancy.
Kearns Sayre syndrome
MedGen UID:
9618
Concept ID:
C0022541
Disease or Syndrome
A mitochondrial disorder featuring the triad of chronic progressive EXTERNAL OPHTHALMOPLEGIA, cardiomyopathy (CARDIOMYOPATHIES) with conduction block (HEART BLOCK), and RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA. Disease onset is in the first or second decade. Elevated CSF protein, sensorineural deafness, seizures, and pyramidal signs may also be present. Ragged-red fibers are found on muscle biopsy. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p984)
Leigh syndrome
MedGen UID:
44095
Concept ID:
C0023264
Disease or Syndrome
Leigh syndrome is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder resulting from defective mitochondrial energy generation. It most commonly presents as a progressive and severe neurodegenerative disorder with onset within the first months or years of life, and may result in early death. Affected individuals usually show global developmental delay or developmental regression, hypotonia, ataxia, dystonia, and ophthalmologic abnormalities, such as nystagmus or optic atrophy. The neurologic features are associated with the classic findings of T2-weighted hyperintensities in the basal ganglia and/or brainstem on brain imaging. Leigh syndrome can also have detrimental multisystemic affects on the cardiac, hepatic, gastrointestinal, and renal organs. Biochemical studies in patients with Leigh syndrome tend to show increased lactate and abnormalities of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, Leigh syndrome may be a clinical feature of a primary deficiency of any of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes: complex I deficiency (see 252010), complex II deficiency (see 252011), complex III deficiency (see 124000), complex IV deficiency (cytochrome c oxidase; see 220110), or complex V deficiency (see 604273) (summary by Lake et al., 2015). Genetic Heterogeneity of Leigh Syndrome Mutations in complex I genes include mitochondrial-encoded MTND2 (516001), MTND3 (516002), MTND5 (516005), and MTND6 (516006), the nuclear-encoded NDUFS1 (157655), NDUFS3 (603846), NDUFS4 (602694), NDUFS7 (601825), NDUFS8 (602141), NDUFA2 (602137), NDUFA9 (603834), NDUFA10 (603835), NDUFA12 (614530), NDUFAF6 (612392), and NDUFAF5 (612360). Mutation in the MTFMT gene (611766), which is involved in mitochondrial translation, has also been reported with complex I deficiency. A mutation has been found in a complex III gene: BCS1L (603647), which is involved in the assembly of complex III. Mutations in complex IV genes include mitochondrial-encoded MTCO3 (516050) and nuclear-encoded COX10 (602125), COX15 (603646), SCO2 (604272), SURF1 (185620), which is involved in the assembly of complex IV, TACO1 (612958), and PET100 (614770). A mutation has been found in a complex V gene: the mitochondrial-encoded MTATP6 (516060). Mutations in genes encoding mitochondrial tRNA proteins have also been identified in patients with Leigh syndrome: see MTTV (590105), MTTK (590060), MTTW (590095), and MTTL1 (590050). Leigh syndrome may also be caused by mutations in components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (e.g., DLD, 238331 and PDHA1, 300502). The French Canadian (or Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean) type of Leigh syndrome with COX deficiency (LSFC; 220111) is caused by mutation in the LRPPRC gene (607544). Deficiency of coenzyme Q10 (607426) can present as Leigh syndrome.
Maple syrup urine disease
MedGen UID:
6217
Concept ID:
C0024776
Disease or Syndrome
Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is classified as classic or intermediate. Twelve hours after birth, untreated neonates with classic MSUD have a maple syrup odor in cerumen; by 12-24 hours, elevated plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) (leucine, isoleucine, and valine) and allo-isoleucine, as well as a generalized disturbance of plasma amino acid concentration ratios; by age two to three days, ketonuria, irritability, and poor feeding; by age four to five days, deepening encephalopathy manifesting as lethargy, intermittent apnea, opisthotonus, and stereotyped movements such as "fencing" and "bicycling." By age seven to ten days, coma and central respiratory failure may supervene. Individuals with intermediate MSUD have partial BCKAD enzyme deficiency that only manifests intermittently or responds to dietary thiamine therapy; these individuals can experience severe metabolic intoxication and encephalopathy during sufficient catabolic stress.
Pyruvate carboxylase deficiency
MedGen UID:
18801
Concept ID:
C0034341
Disease or Syndrome
Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) deficiency is characterized in most affected individuals by failure to thrive, developmental delay, recurrent seizures, and metabolic acidosis. Three clinical types are recognized: Type A (infantile form), in which most affected children die in infancy or early childhood. Type B (severe neonatal form), in which affected infants have hepatomegaly, pyramidal tract signs, and abnormal movement and die within the first three months of life. Type C (intermittent/benign form), in which affected individuals have normal or mildly delayed neurologic development and episodic metabolic acidosis.
Juvenile myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis AND stroke
MedGen UID:
56485
Concept ID:
C0162671
Disease or Syndrome
MELAS syndrome, comprising mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes, is a genetically heterogeneous mitochondrial disorder with a variable clinical phenotype. The disorder is accompanied by features of central nervous system involvement, including seizures, hemiparesis, hemianopsia, cortical blindness, and episodic vomiting (Pavlakis et al., 1984; Montagna et al., 1988). Other mitochondrial encephalomyopathies include Leigh syndrome (LS; 256000), Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS; 530000), MERRF syndrome (545000), and Leber optic atrophy (535000).
Glucose-6-phosphate transport defect
MedGen UID:
78644
Concept ID:
C0268146
Disease or Syndrome
Glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI) is characterized by accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver and kidneys, resulting in hepatomegaly and renomegaly. The two subtypes (GSDIa and GSDIb) are clinically indistinguishable. Some untreated neonates present with severe hypoglycemia; more commonly, however, untreated infants present at age three to four months with hepatomegaly, lactic acidosis, hyperuricemia, hyperlipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and/or hypoglycemic seizures. Affected children typically have doll-like faces with fat cheeks, relatively thin extremities, short stature, and protuberant abdomen. Xanthoma and diarrhea may be present. Impaired platelet function can lead to a bleeding tendency with frequent epistaxis. Untreated GSDIb is associated with impaired neutrophil and monocyte function as well as chronic neutropenia after the first few years of life, all of which result in recurrent bacterial infections and oral and intestinal mucosal ulcers. Long-term complications of untreated GSDI include growth retardation resulting in short stature, osteoporosis, delayed puberty, gout, renal disease, pulmonary hypertension, hepatic adenomas with potential for malignant transformation, polycystic ovaries, pancreatitis, and changes in brain function. Normal growth and puberty is expected in treated children. Most affected individuals live into adulthood.
Deficiency of cytochrome-b5 reductase
MedGen UID:
75661
Concept ID:
C0268193
Disease or Syndrome
Methemoglobinemia due to NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized clinically by decreased oxygen carrying capacity of the blood, with resultant cyanosis and hypoxia (review by Percy and Lappin, 2008). There are 2 types of methemoglobin reductase deficiency. In type I, the defect affects the soluble form of the enzyme, is restricted to red blood cells, and causes well-tolerated methemoglobinemia. In type II, the defect affects both the soluble and microsomal forms of the enzyme and is thus generalized, affecting red cells, leukocytes, and all body tissues. Type II methemoglobinemia is associated with mental deficiency and other neurologic symptoms. The neurologic symptoms may be related to the major role played by the cytochrome b5 system in the desaturation of fatty acids (Vives-Corrons et al., 1978; Kaplan et al., 1979).
Hepatic failure, early-onset, and neurologic disorder due to cytochrome C oxidase deficiency
MedGen UID:
75662
Concept ID:
C0268237
Congenital Abnormality
Leigh syndrome (or subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy) is characterized by decompensation (often with elevated lactate levels in blood and/or CSF) during an intercurrent illness. It is typically associated with psychomotor retardation or regression, often followed by transient or prolonged stabilization or even improvement, but inevitably resulting in eventual progressive neurologic decline, typically occurring in stepwise decrements. Neurologic manifestations include hypotonia, spasticity, movement disorders (including chorea), cerebellar ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. Extraneurologic manifestations may include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, hypertrichosis, anemia, renal tubulopathy, liver involvement, ptosis, and muscle weakness. Onset is typically between ages three and 12 months; about 50% of affected individuals die by age three years, most often as a result of respiratory or cardiac failure. Later onset (including in adulthood) and long-term survival may occasionally occur.
Propionyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency
MedGen UID:
75694
Concept ID:
C0268579
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of propionic acidemia (PA) ranges from neonatal-onset to late-onset disease. Neonatal-onset PA, the most common form, is characterized by a healthy newborn with poor feeding and decreased arousal in the first few days of life, followed by progressive encephalopathy of unexplained origin. Without prompt diagnosis and management, this is followed by progressive encephalopathy manifesting as lethargy, seizures, or coma that can result in death. It is frequently accompanied by metabolic acidosis with anion gap, lactic acidosis, ketonuria, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and cytopenias. Individuals with late-onset PA may remain asymptomatic and suffer a metabolic crisis under catabolic stress (e.g., illness, surgery, fasting) or may experience a more insidious onset with the development of multiorgan complications including vomiting, protein intolerance, failure to thrive, hypotonia, developmental delays or regression, movement disorders, or cardiomyopathy. Isolated cardiomyopathy can be observed on rare occasion in the absence of clinical metabolic decompensation or neurocognitive deficits. Manifestations of neonatal and late-onset PA over time can include growth impairment, intellectual disability, seizures, basal ganglia lesions, pancreatitis, and cardiomyopathy. Other rarely reported complications include optic atrophy, hearing loss, premature ovarian insufficiency, and chronic renal failure.
3-Hydroxyisobutyric aciduria
MedGen UID:
90996
Concept ID:
C0342737
Disease or Syndrome
Phosphate transport defect
MedGen UID:
87455
Concept ID:
C0342749
Disease or Syndrome
Fumarase deficiency
MedGen UID:
87458
Concept ID:
C0342770
Disease or Syndrome
Fumarate hydratase deficiency results in severe neonatal and early infantile encephalopathy that is characterized by poor feeding, failure to thrive, hypotonia, lethargy, and seizures. Dysmorphic facial features include frontal bossing, depressed nasal bridge, and widely spaced eyes. Many affected individuals are microcephalic. A spectrum of brain abnormalities are seen on magnetic resonance imaging, including cerebral atrophy, enlarged ventricles and generous extra-axial cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) spaces, delayed myelination for age, thinning of the corpus callosum, and an abnormally small brain stem. Brain malformations including bilateral polymicrogyria and absence of the corpus callosum can also be observed. Development is severely affected: most affected individuals are non-verbal and non-ambulatory, and many die during early childhood. Less severely affected individuals with moderate cognitive impairment and long-term survival have been reported.
Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome
MedGen UID:
87459
Concept ID:
C0342784
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion syndromes predominantly comprise three overlapping phenotypes that are usually simplex (i.e., a single occurrence in a family), but rarely may be observed in different members of the same family or may evolve from one clinical syndrome to another in a given individual over time. The three classic phenotypes caused by mtDNA deletions are Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), Pearson syndrome, and progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO). KSS is a progressive multisystem disorder defined by onset before age 20 years, pigmentary retinopathy, and PEO; additional features include cerebellar ataxia, impaired intellect (intellectual disability, dementia, or both), sensorineural hearing loss, ptosis, oropharyngeal and esophageal dysfunction, exercise intolerance, muscle weakness, cardiac conduction block, and endocrinopathy. Pearson syndrome is characterized by sideroblastic anemia and exocrine pancreas dysfunction and may be fatal in infancy without appropriate hematologic management. PEO is characterized by ptosis, impaired eye movements due to paralysis of the extraocular muscles (ophthalmoplegia), oropharyngeal weakness, and variably severe proximal limb weakness with exercise intolerance. Rarely, a mtDNA deletion can manifest as Leigh syndrome.
Deficiency of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase
MedGen UID:
91001
Concept ID:
C0342793
Disease or Syndrome
Malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency is an uncommon inherited metabolic disease. The characteristic phenotype is variable, but may include developmental delay in early childhood, seizures, hypotonia, diarrhea, vomiting, metabolic acidosis, hypoglycemia, ketosis, abnormal urinary compounds, lactic acidemia, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (Sweetman and Williams, 2001).
Central sleep apnea syndrome
MedGen UID:
99249
Concept ID:
C0520680
Disease or Syndrome
A condition associated with multiple episodes of sleep apnea which are distinguished from obstructive sleep apnea (SLEEP APNEA, OBSTRUCTIVE) by the complete cessation of efforts to breathe. This disorder is associated with dysfunction of central nervous system centers that regulate respiration.
Oculogastrointestinal muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
167876
Concept ID:
C0872218
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare autosomal recessively inherited neuromuscular disease characterised by ocular manifestations such as ptosis and diplopia followed by chronic diarrhoea, malnutrition and intestinal pseudo-obstruction.
Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility type 2
MedGen UID:
371986
Concept ID:
C1835161
Finding
Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle calcium regulation associated with uncontrolled skeletal muscle hypermetabolism. Manifestations of malignant hyperthermia (MH) are precipitated by certain volatile anesthetics (i.e., halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, enflurane), either alone or in conjunction with a depolarizing muscle relaxant (specifically, succinylcholine). The triggering substances release calcium stores from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and may promote entry of calcium from the myoplasm, causing contracture of skeletal muscles, glycogenolysis, and increased cellular metabolism, resulting in production of heat and excess lactate. Affected individuals experience: acidosis, hypercapnia, tachycardia, hyperthermia, muscle rigidity, compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis with subsequent increase in serum creatine kinase (CK) concentration, hyperkalemia with a risk for cardiac arrhythmia or even arrest, and myoglobinuria with a risk for renal failure. In nearly all cases, the first manifestations of MH (tachycardia and tachypnea) occur in the operating room; however, MH may also occur in the early postoperative period. There is mounting evidence that some affected individuals will also develop MH with exercise and/or on exposure to hot environments. Without proper and prompt treatment with dantrolene sodium, mortality is extremely high.
Mitochondrial phosphate carrier deficiency
MedGen UID:
324373
Concept ID:
C1835845
Disease or Syndrome
Pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase deficiency
MedGen UID:
332448
Concept ID:
C1837429
Disease or Syndrome
Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency is characterized by the buildup of a chemical called lactic acid in the body and a variety of neurological problems. Signs and symptoms of this condition usually first appear shortly after birth, and they can vary widely among affected individuals. The most common feature is a potentially life-threatening buildup of lactic acid (lactic acidosis), which can cause nausea, vomiting, severe breathing problems, and an abnormal heartbeat. People with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency usually have neurological problems as well. Most have delayed development of mental abilities and motor skills such as sitting and walking. Other neurological problems can include intellectual disability, seizures, weak muscle tone (hypotonia), poor coordination, and difficulty walking. Some affected individuals have abnormal brain structures, such as underdevelopment of the tissue connecting the left and right halves of the brain (corpus callosum), wasting away (atrophy) of the exterior part of the brain known as the cerebral cortex, or patches of damaged tissue (lesions) on some parts of the brain. Because of the severe health effects, many individuals with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency do not survive past childhood, although some may live into adolescence or adulthood.
Mitochondrial myopathy with sideroblastic anemia syndrome
MedGen UID:
373888
Concept ID:
C1838103
Disease or Syndrome
Belongs to the heterogeneous family of metabolic myopathies. It is characterised by progressive exercise intolerance manifesting in childhood, onset of sideroblastic anaemia around adolescence, lactic acidaemia and mitochondrial myopathy. Less than 10 cases have been described so far. A 656C-->T mutation in the nuclear pseudouridine synthase 1 gene (PUS1), localised to 12q24.33, has recently been identified in some patients. Deficient pseudouridylation of mitochondrial tRNAs may be responsible for the oxidative phosphorylation disorder. Transmission is autosomal recessive.
Succinic acidemia
MedGen UID:
373921
Concept ID:
C1838243
Disease or Syndrome
Lethal infantile mitochondrial myopathy
MedGen UID:
374077
Concept ID:
C1838876
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial diseases are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that arise as a result of dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. They can be caused by mutation of genes encoded by either nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). While some mitochondrial disorders only affect a single organ (e.g., the eye in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy [LHON]), many involve multiple organ systems and often present with prominent neurologic and myopathic features. Mitochondrial disorders may present at any age. Many individuals with a mutation of mtDNA display a cluster of clinical features that fall into a discrete clinical syndrome, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF), neurogenic weakness with ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP), or Leigh syndrome (LS). However, considerable clinical variability exists and many individuals do not fit neatly into one particular category, which is well-illustrated by the overlapping spectrum of disease phenotypes (including mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) resulting from mutation of the nuclear gene POLG, which has emerged as a major cause of mitochondrial disease. Common clinical features of mitochondrial disease – whether involving a mitochondrial or nuclear gene – include ptosis, external ophthalmoplegia, proximal myopathy and exercise intolerance, cardiomyopathy, sensorineural deafness, optic atrophy, pigmentary retinopathy, and diabetes mellitus. Common central nervous system findings are fluctuating encephalopathy, seizures, dementia, migraine, stroke-like episodes, ataxia, and spasticity. A high incidence of mid- and late pregnancy loss is a common occurrence that often goes unrecognized.
Mitochondrial complex I deficiency
MedGen UID:
374101
Concept ID:
C1838979
Disease or Syndrome
Coenzyme Q10 deficiency
MedGen UID:
334528
Concept ID:
C1843920
Disease or Syndrome
A genetically heterogeneous condition, typically inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion, characterized by coenzyme Q10 deficiency.
Amish lethal microcephaly
MedGen UID:
375938
Concept ID:
C1846648
Disease or Syndrome
Amish lethal microcephaly is characterized by severe congenital microcephaly and highly elevated 2-ketoglutarate or lactic acidosis. The occipitofrontal circumference is typically more than two standard deviations (occasionally >6 SD) below the mean; anterior and posterior fontanels are closed at birth and facial features are distorted. The average life span of an affected infant is between five and six months among the Lancaster Amish, although an affected Amish-Mennonite child was reported to be living with severe developmental delay at age seven years.
Hypotonia-cystinuria syndrome
MedGen UID:
341133
Concept ID:
C1848030
Disease or Syndrome
Phenformin 4-hydroxylation
MedGen UID:
342365
Concept ID:
C1849927
Molecular Function
Navajo neurohepatopathy
MedGen UID:
338045
Concept ID:
C1850406
Disease or Syndrome
MPV17-related mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance defect presents in the vast majority of affected individuals as an early-onset encephalohepatopathic (hepatocerebral) disease that is typically associated with mtDNA depletion, particularly in the liver. A later-onset neuromyopathic disease characterized by myopathy and neuropathy, and associated with multiple mtDNA deletions in muscle, has also rarely been described. MPV17-related mtDNA maintenance defect, encephalohepatopathic form is characterized by: Hepatic manifestations (liver dysfunction that typically progresses to liver failure, cholestasis, hepatomegaly, and steatosis); Neurologic involvement (developmental delay, hypotonia, microcephaly, and motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy); Gastrointestinal manifestations (gastrointestinal dysmotility, feeding difficulties, and failure to thrive); and Metabolic derangements (lactic acidosis and hypoglycemia). Less frequent manifestations include renal tubulopathy, nephrocalcinosis, and hypoparathyroidism. Progressive liver disease often leads to death in infancy or early childhood. Hepatocellular carcinoma has been reported.
Myopathy with lactic acidosis, hereditary
MedGen UID:
342573
Concept ID:
C1850718
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy with deficiency of ISCU, a mitochondrial myopathy, is classically characterized by lifelong exercise intolerance in which minor exertion causes tachycardia, shortness of breath, fatigue, and pain of active muscles; episodes of more profound exercise intolerance associated with rhabdomyolysis, myoglobinuria, and weakness that may be severe; and typically full recovery of muscle strength between episodes of rhabdomyolysis. Affected individuals usually have near-normal strength; they can have large calves.
Deficiency of mitochondrial complex III
MedGen UID:
377658
Concept ID:
C1852372
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial myopathy with lactic acidosis
MedGen UID:
343245
Concept ID:
C1855033
Disease or Syndrome
Pyruvate dehydrogenase E3-binding protein deficiency
MedGen UID:
343383
Concept ID:
C1855553
Disease or Syndrome
Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency is characterized by the buildup of a chemical called lactic acid in the body and a variety of neurological problems. Signs and symptoms of this condition usually first appear shortly after birth, and they can vary widely among affected individuals. The most common feature is a potentially life-threatening buildup of lactic acid (lactic acidosis), which can cause nausea, vomiting, severe breathing problems, and an abnormal heartbeat. People with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency usually have neurological problems as well. Most have delayed development of mental abilities and motor skills such as sitting and walking. Other neurological problems can include intellectual disability, seizures, weak muscle tone (hypotonia), poor coordination, and difficulty walking. Some affected individuals have abnormal brain structures, such as underdevelopment of the tissue connecting the left and right halves of the brain (corpus callosum), wasting away (atrophy) of the exterior part of the brain known as the cerebral cortex, or patches of damaged tissue (lesions) on some parts of the brain. Because of the severe health effects, many individuals with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency do not survive past childhood, although some may live into adolescence or adulthood.
Leigh syndrome, French Canadian type
MedGen UID:
387801
Concept ID:
C1857355
Disease or Syndrome
The French Canadian type of Leigh syndrome is an autosomal recessive severe neurologic disorder with onset in infancy. Features include delayed psychomotor development, mental retardation, mild dysmorphic facial features, hypotonia, ataxia, and the development of lesions in the brainstem and basal ganglia. Affected individuals tend to have episodic metabolic and/or neurologic crises in early childhood, which often lead to early death (summary by Debray et al., 2011). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Leigh syndrome, see 256000.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 4
MedGen UID:
387884
Concept ID:
C1857682
Disease or Syndrome
Cardioencephalomyopathy, fatal infantile, due to cytochrome c oxidase deficiency
MedGen UID:
346817
Concept ID:
C1858424
Disease or Syndrome
Cardioencephalomyopathy due to cytochrome c oxidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder characterized by onset of cardiomyopathy either in utero or in the first days of life. Most patients also show neurologic abnormalities, such as abnormal breathing pattern, nystagmus, and gyral abnormalities, consistent with encephalopathy. The disorder is usually fatal in early infancy (summary by Papadopoulou et al., 1999). Genetic Heterogeneity of Fatal Infantile Cardioencephalomyopathy Due to Cytochrome c Oxidase Deficiency See also CEMCOX2 (615119), caused by mutation in the COX15 gene (603646) on chromosome 10q24; CEMCOX3 (616500), caused by mutation in the COA5 gene (613920) on chromosome 2q11; and CEMCOX4 (616501), caused by mutation in the COA6 gene (614772) on chromosome 1q42. For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of cytochrome c oxidase deficiency, see 220110.
Alaninuria with microcephaly, dwarfism, enamel hypoplasia and diabetes mellitus
MedGen UID:
348505
Concept ID:
C1859965
Congenital Abnormality
Syndrome with the association of microcephaly, low birth weight and severe intellectual deficit with dwarfism, small teeth and diabetes mellitus. Two cases have been described. Biochemical tests reveal the presence of high levels of alanine in the urine and elevated alanine, pyruvate and lactate levels in the blood.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 3
MedGen UID:
355842
Concept ID:
C1864840
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 2
MedGen UID:
400626
Concept ID:
C1864843
Disease or Syndrome
Ethylmalonic encephalopathy
MedGen UID:
355966
Concept ID:
C1865349
Disease or Syndrome
Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is a severe, early-onset, progressive disorder characterized by developmental delay / mild-to-severe intellectual disability; generalized infantile hypotonia that evolves into hypertonia, spasticity, and (in some instances) dystonia; generalized tonic-clonic seizures; and generalized microvascular damage (diffuse and spontaneous relapsing petechial purpura, hemorrhagic suffusions of mucosal surfaces, and chronic hemorrhagic diarrhea). Infants sometimes have frequent vomiting and loss of social interaction. Speech is delayed and in some instances absent. Swallowing difficulties and failure to thrive are common. Children may be unable to walk without support and may be wheelchair bound. Neurologic deterioration accelerates following intercurrent infectious illness, and the majority of children die in the first decade.
Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family, member 9, deficiency of
MedGen UID:
370195
Concept ID:
C1970173
Disease or Syndrome
MC1DN20 is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by infantile onset of acute metabolic acidosis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and muscle weakness associated with a deficiency of mitochondrial complex I activity in muscle, liver, and fibroblasts (summary by Haack et al., 2010). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex I deficiency, see 252010.
Coenzyme Q10 deficiency, primary, 4
MedGen UID:
436985
Concept ID:
C2677589
Disease or Syndrome
Primary coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is usually associated with multisystem involvement, including neurologic manifestations such as fatal neonatal encephalopathy with hypotonia; a late-onset slowly progressive multiple-system atrophy-like phenotype (neurodegeneration with autonomic failure and various combinations of parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, and pyramidal dysfunction); and dystonia, spasticity, seizures, and intellectual disability. Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), the hallmark renal manifestation, is often the initial manifestation either as isolated renal involvement that progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or associated with encephalopathy (seizures, stroke-like episodes, severe neurologic impairment) resulting in early death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), retinopathy or optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss can also be seen.
MITOCHONDRIAL COMPLEX V (ATP SYNTHASE) DEFICIENCY, ATPAF2 TYPE
MedGen UID:
398105
Concept ID:
C2700431
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, encephalomyopathic form, with renal tubulopathy
MedGen UID:
412815
Concept ID:
C2749861
Disease or Syndrome
RRM2B-related mitochondrial disease can be grouped by disease pathogenesis, phenotype, and mode of inheritance into two major types: mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and multiple mtDNA deletions. Mitochondrial DNA depletion usually manifests as severe multisystem disease (encephalomyopathy with proximal renal tubulopathy) and is often fatal in early life. Inheritance is autosomal recessive. Multiple mtDNA deletions cause tissue-specific cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency. Inheritance can be either autosomal recessive (with progressive external ophthalmoplegia [PEO] and multisystem involvement manifesting during early childhood/adulthood) or autosomal dominant (with less severe, often tissue-specific manifestations [e.g., chronic PEO] developing in later adulthood). Other rarer phenotypes are Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) and mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE).
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 5 (encephalomyopathic with or without methylmalonic aciduria)
MedGen UID:
413170
Concept ID:
C2749864
Disease or Syndrome
SUCLA2-related mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome, encephalomyopathic form with methylmalonic aciduria is characterized by onset of the following features in infancy or childhood (median age of onset 2 months; range of onset birth to 6 years): psychomotor retardation, hypotonia, dystonia, muscular atrophy, sensorineural hearing impairment, postnatal growth retardation, and feeding difficulties. Other, less frequent, features include distinctive facial features, contractures, kyphoscoliosis, gastroesophageal reflux, ptosis, choreoathetosis, ophthalmoplegia, and epilepsy (infantile spasms or generalized convulsions). The median survival is 20 years; approximately 30% of affected individuals succumb during childhood. Affected individuals may have hyperintensities in the basal ganglia, cerebral atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy on head MRI. Elevation of methylmalonic acid (MMA) in the urine and plasma is found in a vast majority of affected individuals, although at levels that are far below those typically seen in individuals with classic methylmalonic aciduria.
Glycogen storage disease IXc
MedGen UID:
442778
Concept ID:
C2751643
Disease or Syndrome
Phosphorylase kinase (PhK) deficiency causing glycogen storage disease type IX (GSD IX) results from deficiency of the enzyme phosphorylase b kinase, which has a major regulatory role in the breakdown of glycogen. The two types of PhK deficiency are liver PhK deficiency (characterized by early childhood onset of hepatomegaly and growth restriction, and often, but not always, fasting ketosis and hypoglycemia) and muscle PhK deficiency, which is considerably rarer (characterized by any of the following: exercise intolerance, myalgia, muscle cramps, myoglobinuria, and progressive muscle weakness). While symptoms and biochemical abnormalities of liver PhK deficiency were thought to improve with age, it is becoming evident that patients need to be monitored for long-term complications such as liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.
Glycogen storage disease type 1A
MedGen UID:
415885
Concept ID:
C2919796
Disease or Syndrome
Glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI) is characterized by accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver and kidneys, resulting in hepatomegaly and renomegaly. The two subtypes (GSDIa and GSDIb) are clinically indistinguishable. Some untreated neonates present with severe hypoglycemia; more commonly, however, untreated infants present at age three to four months with hepatomegaly, lactic acidosis, hyperuricemia, hyperlipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and/or hypoglycemic seizures. Affected children typically have doll-like faces with fat cheeks, relatively thin extremities, short stature, and protuberant abdomen. Xanthoma and diarrhea may be present. Impaired platelet function can lead to a bleeding tendency with frequent epistaxis. Untreated GSDIb is associated with impaired neutrophil and monocyte function as well as chronic neutropenia after the first few years of life, all of which result in recurrent bacterial infections and oral and intestinal mucosal ulcers. Long-term complications of untreated GSDI include growth retardation resulting in short stature, osteoporosis, delayed puberty, gout, renal disease, pulmonary hypertension, hepatic adenomas with potential for malignant transformation, polycystic ovaries, pancreatitis, and changes in brain function. Normal growth and puberty is expected in treated children. Most affected individuals live into adulthood.
Malignant hyperpyrexia susceptibility type 3
MedGen UID:
418956
Concept ID:
C2930982
Pathologic Function
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
461100
Concept ID:
C3149750
Disease or Syndrome
TK2-related mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance defect is a phenotypic continuum that ranges from severe to mild. To date, approximately 107 individuals with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis have been reported. Three main subtypes of presentation have been described: Infantile-onset myopathy with neurologic involvement and rapid progression to early death. Affected individuals experience progressive muscle weakness leading to respiratory failure. Some individuals develop dysarthria, dysphagia, and/or hearing loss. Cognitive function is typically spared. Juvenile/childhood onset with generalized proximal weakness and survival to at least 13 years. Late-/adult-onset myopathy with facial and limb weakness and mtDNA deletions. Some affected individuals develop respiratory insufficiency, chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, dysphagia, and dysarthria.
Myopathy, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia 2
MedGen UID:
462152
Concept ID:
C3150802
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia-2 is an autosomal recessive disorder of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The disorder shows marked phenotypic variability: some patients have a severe multisystem disorder from infancy, including cardiomyopathy and respiratory insufficiency resulting in early death, whereas others present in the second or third decade of life with sideroblastic anemia and mild muscle weakness (summary by Riley et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of MLASA, see MLASA1 (600462).
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 9 (encephalomyopathic with methylmalonic aciduria)
MedGen UID:
462826
Concept ID:
C3151476
Disease or Syndrome
SUCLG1-related mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome, encephalomyopathic form with methylmalonic aciduria is characterized in the majority of affected newborns by hypotonia, muscle atrophy, feeding difficulties, and lactic acidosis. Affected infants commonly manifest developmental delay / cognitive impairment, growth retardation / failure to thrive, hepatopathy, sensorineural hearing impairment, dystonia, and hypertonia. Notable findings in some affected individuals include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, epilepsy, myoclonus, microcephaly, sleep disturbance, rhabdomyolysis, contractures, hypothermia, and/or hypoglycemia. Life span is shortened, with median survival of 20 months.
Mitochondrial DNA-depletion syndrome 3, hepatocerebral
MedGen UID:
462863
Concept ID:
C3151513
Disease or Syndrome
The two forms of deoxyguanosine kinase (DGUOK) deficiency are a neonatal multisystem disorder and an isolated hepatic disorder that presents later in infancy or childhood. The majority of affected individuals have the multisystem illness with hepatic disease (jaundice, cholestasis, hepatomegaly, and elevated transaminases) and neurologic manifestations (hypotonia, nystagmus, and psychomotor retardation) evident within weeks of birth. Those with isolated liver disease may also have renal involvement and some later develop mild hypotonia. Progressive hepatic disease is the most common cause of death in both forms.
Mitochondrial myopathy, infantile, transient
MedGen UID:
463248
Concept ID:
C3151898
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile mitochondrial myopathy due to reversible COX deficiency is a rare mitochondrial disorder characterized by onset in infancy of severe hypotonia and generalized muscle weakness associated with lactic acidosis, but is distinguished from other mitochondrial disorders in that affected individuals recover spontaneously after 1 year of age (summary by Mimaki et al., 2010). See also transient infantile liver failure (LFIT; 613070), which is a similar disorder.
2-methyl-3-hydroxybutyric aciduria
MedGen UID:
781653
Concept ID:
C3266731
Disease or Syndrome
HSD10 mitochondrial disease most commonly presents as an X-linked neurodegenerative disorder with highly variable severity and age at onset ranging from the neonatal period to early childhood. The features are usually multisystemic, consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction. Some affected males have a severe infantile form associated with cardiomyopathy that may result in death in early childhood, whereas other rare patients may have juvenile onset or even atypical presentations with normal neurologic development. More severely affected males show developmental regression in infancy or early childhood, often associated with early-onset intractable seizures, progressive choreoathetosis and spastic tetraplegia, optic atrophy or retinal degeneration resulting in visual loss, and mental retardation. Heterozygous females may show non-progressive developmental delay and intellectual disability, but may also be clinically normal. Although the diagnosis can be aided by the observation of increased urinary levels of metabolites of isoleucine breakdown (2-methyl-3 hydroxybutyrate and tiglylglycine), there is not a correlation between these laboratory features and the phenotype. In addition, patients do not develop severe metabolic crises in the neonatal period as observed in other organic acidurias, but may show persistent lactic acidosis, most likely reflecting mitochondrial dysfunction (summary by Rauschenberger et al., 2010; review by Zschocke, 2012). In a review of the disorder, Zschocke (2012) noted that although this disorder was originally thought to be an inborn error of branched-chain fatty acid and isoleucine metabolism resulting from decreased HSD17B10 dehydrogenase activity (HSD17B10 'deficiency'), subsequent studies have shown that the HSD17B10 gene product has additional functions and also acts as a component of the mitochondrial RNase P holoenzyme, which is involved in mitochondrial tRNA processing and maturation and ultimately mitochondrial protein synthesis. The multisystemic features of HSD10MD most likely result from the adverse effect of HSD17B10 mutations on mitochondrial function, rather than from the effects on the dehydrogenase activity (see PATHOGENESIS below).
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
478062
Concept ID:
C3276432
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome is a severe autosomal recessive disorder of systemic energy metabolism, resulting in weakness, respiratory failure, lack of neurologic development, lactic acidosis, and early death (summary by Seyda et al., 2001). Genetic Heterogeneity of Multiple Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Syndrome See also MMDS2 (614299), caused by mutation in the BOLA3 gene (613183) on chromosome 2p13; MMDS3 (615330), caused by mutation in the IBA57 gene (615316) on chromosome 1q42; MMDS4 (616370), caused by mutation in the ISCA2 gene (615317) on chromosome 14q24; MMDS5 (617613), caused by mutation in the ISCA1 gene (611006) on chromosome 9q21; and MMDS6 (617954), caused by mutation in the PMPCB gene (603131) on chromosome 7q22.
Liver failure acute infantile
MedGen UID:
480294
Concept ID:
C3278664
Disease or Syndrome
Acute infantile liver failure resulting from TRMU mutation is a transient disorder of hepatic function. In addition to elevated liver enzymes, jaundice, vomiting, coagulopathy, and hyperbilirubinemia, the presence of increased serum lactate is consistent with a defect in mitochondrial respiratory function. With supportive care, patients who survive the initial acute episode can recover and show normal development (Zeharia et al., 2009). See also transient infantile mitochondrial myopathy (MMIT; 500009), which is a similar disorder. A more severe, permanent disorder with some overlapping features is associated with mitochondrial DNA depletion (251880). See ILFS1 (615438) for information on syndromic infantile liver failure.
Nuclearly-encoded mitochondrial complex V (ATP synthase) deficiency 2
MedGen UID:
481329
Concept ID:
C3279699
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex V deficiency is a shortage (deficiency) of a protein complex called complex V or a loss of its function. Complex V is found in cell structures called mitochondria, which convert the energy from food into a form that cells can use. Complex V is the last of five mitochondrial complexes that carry out a multistep process called oxidative phosphorylation, through which cells derive much of their energy.Mitochondrial complex V deficiency can cause a wide variety of signs and symptoms affecting many organs and systems of the body, particularly the nervous system and the heart. The disorder can be life-threatening in infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals may have feeding problems, slow growth, low muscle tone (hypotonia), extreme fatigue (lethargy), and developmental delay. They tend to develop elevated levels of lactic acid in the blood (lactic acidosis), which can cause nausea, vomiting, weakness, and rapid breathing. High levels of ammonia in the blood (hyperammonemia) can also occur in affected individuals, and in some cases result in abnormal brain function (encephalopathy) and damage to other organs.Another common feature of mitochondrial complex V deficiency is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This condition is characterized by thickening (hypertrophy) of the heart (cardiac) muscle that can lead to heart failure. People with mitochondrial complex V deficiency may also have a characteristic pattern of facial features, including a high forehead, curved eyebrows, outside corners of the eyes that point downward (downslanting palpebral fissures), a prominent bridge of the nose, low-set ears, thin lips, and a small chin (micrognathia).Some people with mitochondrial complex V deficiency have groups of signs and symptoms that are classified as a specific syndrome. For example, mitochondrial complex V deficiency can cause a condition called neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP). NARP causes a variety of signs and symptoms chiefly affecting the nervous system. Beginning in childhood or early adulthood, most people with NARP experience numbness, tingling, or pain in the arms and legs (sensory neuropathy); muscle weakness; and problems with balance and coordination (ataxia). Many affected individuals also have cognitive impairment and an eye disorder called retinitis pigmentosa that causes vision loss.A condition called Leigh syndrome can also be caused by mitochondrial complex V deficiency. Leigh syndrome is characterized by progressive loss of mental and movement abilities (developmental or psychomotor regression) and typically results in death within 2 to 3 years after the onset of symptoms. Both NARP and Leigh syndrome can also have other causes.
Nuclearly-encoded mitochondrial complex V (ATP synthase) deficiency 3
MedGen UID:
481338
Concept ID:
C3279708
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex V deficiency is a shortage (deficiency) of a protein complex called complex V or a loss of its function. Complex V is found in cell structures called mitochondria, which convert the energy from food into a form that cells can use. Complex V is the last of five mitochondrial complexes that carry out a multistep process called oxidative phosphorylation, through which cells derive much of their energy.Mitochondrial complex V deficiency can cause a wide variety of signs and symptoms affecting many organs and systems of the body, particularly the nervous system and the heart. The disorder can be life-threatening in infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals may have feeding problems, slow growth, low muscle tone (hypotonia), extreme fatigue (lethargy), and developmental delay. They tend to develop elevated levels of lactic acid in the blood (lactic acidosis), which can cause nausea, vomiting, weakness, and rapid breathing. High levels of ammonia in the blood (hyperammonemia) can also occur in affected individuals, and in some cases result in abnormal brain function (encephalopathy) and damage to other organs.Another common feature of mitochondrial complex V deficiency is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This condition is characterized by thickening (hypertrophy) of the heart (cardiac) muscle that can lead to heart failure. People with mitochondrial complex V deficiency may also have a characteristic pattern of facial features, including a high forehead, curved eyebrows, outside corners of the eyes that point downward (downslanting palpebral fissures), a prominent bridge of the nose, low-set ears, thin lips, and a small chin (micrognathia).Some people with mitochondrial complex V deficiency have groups of signs and symptoms that are classified as a specific syndrome. For example, mitochondrial complex V deficiency can cause a condition called neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP). NARP causes a variety of signs and symptoms chiefly affecting the nervous system. Beginning in childhood or early adulthood, most people with NARP experience numbness, tingling, or pain in the arms and legs (sensory neuropathy); muscle weakness; and problems with balance and coordination (ataxia). Many affected individuals also have cognitive impairment and an eye disorder called retinitis pigmentosa that causes vision loss.A condition called Leigh syndrome can also be caused by mitochondrial complex V deficiency. Leigh syndrome is characterized by progressive loss of mental and movement abilities (developmental or psychomotor regression) and typically results in death within 2 to 3 years after the onset of symptoms. Both NARP and Leigh syndrome can also have other causes.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 8
MedGen UID:
481423
Concept ID:
C3279793
Disease or Syndrome
COXPD8 is an autosomal recessive disorder due to dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The main clinical manifestation is a lethal infantile hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but there may also be subtle skeletal muscle and brain involvement. Biochemical studies show combined respiratory chain complex deficiencies in complexes I, III, and IV in cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle, and brain. The liver is not affected (summary by Gotz et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Pyruvate dehydrogenase E1-beta deficiency
MedGen UID:
481471
Concept ID:
C3279841
Disease or Syndrome
Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency is characterized by the buildup of a chemical called lactic acid in the body and a variety of neurological problems. Signs and symptoms of this condition usually first appear shortly after birth, and they can vary widely among affected individuals. The most common feature is a potentially life-threatening buildup of lactic acid (lactic acidosis), which can cause nausea, vomiting, severe breathing problems, and an abnormal heartbeat. People with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency usually have neurological problems as well. Most have delayed development of mental abilities and motor skills such as sitting and walking. Other neurological problems can include intellectual disability, seizures, weak muscle tone (hypotonia), poor coordination, and difficulty walking. Some affected individuals have abnormal brain structures, such as underdevelopment of the tissue connecting the left and right halves of the brain (corpus callosum), wasting away (atrophy) of the exterior part of the brain known as the cerebral cortex, or patches of damaged tissue (lesions) on some parts of the brain. Because of the severe health effects, many individuals with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency do not survive past childhood, although some may live into adolescence or adulthood.
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
482008
Concept ID:
C3280378
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome-2 (MMDS2) with hyperglycinemia is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by developmental regression in infancy. Affected children have an encephalopathic disease course with seizures, spasticity, loss of head control, and abnormal movement. Additional more variable features include optic atrophy, cardiomyopathy, and leukodystrophy. Laboratory studies show increased serum glycine and lactate. Most patients die in childhood. The disorder represents a form of 'variant' nonketotic hyperglycinemia and is distinct from classic nonketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH, or GCE; 605899), which is characterized by significantly increased CSF glycine. Several forms of 'variant' NKH, including MMDS2, appear to result from defects of mitochondrial lipoate biosynthesis (summary by Baker et al., 2014). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome, see MMDS1 (605711).
Encephalopathy due to defective mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission 1
MedGen UID:
482290
Concept ID:
C3280660
Disease or Syndrome
Encephalopathy due to defective mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission-1 is characterized by delayed psychomotor development and hypotonia that may lead to death in childhood. Many patients develop refractory seizures, consistent with an epileptic encephalopathy, and thereafter show neurologic decline. The age at onset, features, and severity are variable, and some patients may not have clinical evidence of mitochondrial or peroxisomal dysfunction (summary by Sheffer et al., 2016; Fahrner et al., 2016). Genetic Heterogeneity of Encephalopathy Due to Defective Mitochondrial And Peroxisomal Fission See also EMPF2 (617086), caused by mutation in the MFF gene (614785) on chromosome 2q36.
Pyruvate dehydrogenase lipoic acid synthetase deficiency
MedGen UID:
482517
Concept ID:
C3280887
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperglycinemia, lactic acidosis, and seizures is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset of hypotonia and seizures associated with increased serum glycine and lactate in the first days of life. Affected individuals develop an encephalopathy or severely delayed psychomotor development, which may result in death in childhood. The disorder represents a form of 'variant' nonketotic hyperglycinemia and is distinct from classic nonketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH, or GCE; 605899), which is characterized by significantly increased CSF glycine. Several forms of 'variant' NKH, including HGCLAS, appear to result from defects of mitochondrial lipoate biosynthesis (summary by Baker et al., 2014).
Encephalomyopathy, mitochondrial, due to voltage-dependent anion channel deficiency
MedGen UID:
482736
Concept ID:
C3281106
Disease or Syndrome
Coenzyme Q10 deficiency, primary, 5
MedGen UID:
766288
Concept ID:
C3553374
Disease or Syndrome
Primary coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is usually associated with multisystem involvement, including neurologic manifestations such as fatal neonatal encephalopathy with hypotonia; a late-onset slowly progressive multiple-system atrophy-like phenotype (neurodegeneration with autonomic failure and various combinations of parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, and pyramidal dysfunction); and dystonia, spasticity, seizures, and intellectual disability. Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), the hallmark renal manifestation, is often the initial manifestation either as isolated renal involvement that progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or associated with encephalopathy (seizures, stroke-like episodes, severe neurologic impairment) resulting in early death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), retinopathy or optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss can also be seen.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 10
MedGen UID:
766443
Concept ID:
C3553529
Disease or Syndrome
COXPD10 is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting in variable defects of mitochondrial oxidative respiration. Affected individuals present in infancy with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and lactic acidosis. The severity is variable, but can be fatal in the most severe cases (summary by Ghezzi et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
3-methylglutaconic aciduria with deafness, encephalopathy, and Leigh-like syndrome
MedGen UID:
766511
Concept ID:
C3553597
Disease or Syndrome
MEGDEL (3-methylglutaconic aciduria with deafness, encephalopathy and Leigh-like) syndrome is characterized in neonates by hypoglycemia and a sepsis-like clinical picture for which no infectious agent can be found. During the first year of life feeding problems, failure to thrive, and/or truncal hypotonia become evident; many infants experience (transient) liver involvement ranging from undulating transaminases to prolonged hyperbilirubinemia and near-fatal liver failure. By age two years progressive deafness, dystonia, and spasticity prevent further psychomotor development and/or result in loss of acquired skills. Affected children are completely dependent on care for all activities of daily living; speech is absent.
Mitochondrial pyruvate carrier deficiency
MedGen UID:
766521
Concept ID:
C3553607
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial pyruvate carrier deficiency is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development and lactic acidosis with a normal lactate/pyruvate ratio resulting from impaired mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation (summary by Bricker et al., 2012).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 11
MedGen UID:
766981
Concept ID:
C3554067
Disease or Syndrome
COXPD11 is a severe multisystemic autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neonatal hypotonia and lactic acidosis. Affected individuals may have respiratory insufficiency, foot deformities, or seizures, and all reported patients have died in infancy. Biochemical studies show deficiencies of multiple mitochondrial respiratory enzymes (summary by Garcia-Diaz et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 12
MedGen UID:
766993
Concept ID:
C3554079
Disease or Syndrome
COXPD12 is an autosomal recessive mitochondrial neurologic disorder characterized by onset in infancy of hypotonia and delayed psychomotor development, or early developmental regression, associated with T2-weighted hyperintensities in the deep cerebral white matter, brainstem, and cerebellar white matter. Serum lactate is increased due to a defect in mitochondrial respiration. There are 2 main phenotypic groups: those with a milder disease course and some recovery of skills after age 2 years, and those with a severe disease course resulting in marked disability (summary by Steenweg et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 14
MedGen UID:
767082
Concept ID:
C3554168
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of FARS2 deficiency ranges from the infantile-onset phenotype, characterized by epileptic encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and poor prognosis (70% of affected individuals), to the later-onset phenotype, characterized by spastic paraplegia, less severe neurologic manifestations, and longer survival (30% of affected individuals). To date FARS2 deficiency has been reported in 37 individuals from 25 families. Infantile-onset phenotype. Seizures are difficult to control and may progress quickly at an early age to intractable seizures with frequent status epilepticus; some children have hypsarrhythmia on EEG. All have developmental delay; most are nonverbal and unable to walk. Feeding difficulties are common. More than half of affected children die in early childhood. Later-onset phenotype. All affected individuals have spastic paraplegia manifested by weakness, spasticity, and exaggerated reflexes of the lower extremities associated with walking difficulties; some have developmental delay/intellectual disability; some have brief seizures that resolve over time.
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
815495
Concept ID:
C3809165
Disease or Syndrome
MMDS3 is an autosomal recessive severe neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of previously acquired developmental milestones in the first months or years of life. Some affected patients have normal development in early infancy before the onset of symptoms, whereas others show delays from birth. Features included loss of motor function, spasticity, pyramidal signs, loss of speech, and cognitive impairment. The disease course is highly variable: some patients die of respiratory failure early in childhood, whereas some survive but may be bedridden with a feeding tube. Less commonly, some patients may survive and have a stable course with motor deficits and mild or even absent cognitive impairment, although there may be fluctuating symptoms, often in response to infection. Other variable features include visual problems and seizures. Brain imaging shows diffuse leukodystrophy in the subcortical region, brainstem, cerebellum, and spinal cord. Laboratory studies tend to show increased lactate and CSF glycine, and decreased activity of mitochondrial complexes I and II, although these findings are also variable. There may be additional biochemical evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (summary by Liu et al., 2018). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome, see MMDS1 (605711).
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 12b (cardiomyopathic type), autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
815773
Concept ID:
C3809443
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome-12B is an autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder characterized by childhood onset of slowly progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and generalized skeletal myopathy resulting in exercise intolerance, and, in some patients, muscle weakness and atrophy. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows ragged-red fibers, mtDNA depletion, and accumulation of abnormal mitochondria (summary by Echaniz-Laguna et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mtDNA depletion syndromes, see MTDPS1 (603041).
Infantile liver failure syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
815852
Concept ID:
C3809522
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 17
MedGen UID:
815856
Concept ID:
C3809526
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-17 is an autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by onset of severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the first year of life. Other features include hypotonia, poor growth, lactic acidosis, and failure to thrive. The disorder may be fatal in early childhood (summary by Haack et al., 2013).
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 13 (encephalomyopathic type)
MedGen UID:
815922
Concept ID:
C3809592
Disease or Syndrome
FBXL4-related encephalomyopathic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome is a multi-system disorder characterized primarily by congenital or early-onset lactic acidosis and growth failure, feeding difficulty, hypotonia, and developmental delay. Other neurologic manifestations can include seizures, movement disorders, ataxia, autonomic dysfunction, and stroke-like episodes. All affected individuals alive at the time they were reported (median age: 3.5 years) demonstrated significant developmental delay. Other findings can involve the heart (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, congenital heart malformations, arrhythmias), liver (mildly elevated transaminases), eyes (cataract, strabismus, nystagmus, optic atrophy), hearing (sensorineural hearing loss), and bone marrow (neutropenia, lymphopenia). Survival varies; the median age of reported deaths was two years (range 2 days - 75 months), although surviving individuals as old as 36 years have been reported. To date FBXL4-related mtDNA depletion syndrome has been reported in 50 individuals.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 18
MedGen UID:
816331
Concept ID:
C3810001
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-18 is an autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial function characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, hypotonia, visual impairment, speech delay, and lactic acidosis associated with decreased mitochondrial respiratory chain activity. Affected patients may also show hematologic abnormalities, mainly macrocytic anemia (summary by Hildick-Smith et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 19
MedGen UID:
816385
Concept ID:
C3810055
Disease or Syndrome
Carbonic anhydrase VA deficiency, hyperammonemia due to
MedGen UID:
816734
Concept ID:
C3810404
Disease or Syndrome
The four children with carbonic anhydrase VA (CA-VA) deficiency reported to date presented between day two of life and age 20 months with hyperammonemic encephalopathy (i.e., lethargy, feeding intolerance, weight loss, tachypnea, seizures, and coma). Data on long-term follow up are limited (the oldest known patient is age 7 years). Two of the four children showed normal psychomotor development and two showed mild learning difficulties and delayed motor skills. Seven additional children diagnosed with CA-VA deficiency (but not yet published) presented similarly.
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency, nuclear type 8
MedGen UID:
862877
Concept ID:
C4014440
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency, nuclear type 8, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive neurodegeneration with onset in childhood. Affected individuals may have normal or delayed early development, and often have episodic acute neurologic decompensation and regression associated with febrile illnesses. The developmental regression results in variable intellectual disability and motor deficits, such as hypotonia, axial hypertonia, and spasticity; some patients may lose the ability to walk independently. Laboratory studies show increased serum lactate and isolated deficiency of mitochondrial complex III in skeletal muscle and fibroblasts. Brain imaging shows a characteristic pattern of multifocal small cystic lesions in the periventricular and deep cerebral white matter (summary by Dallabona et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex III deficiency, see MC3DN1 (124000).
Sideroblastic anemia with B-cell immunodeficiency, periodic fevers, and developmental delay
MedGen UID:
863609
Concept ID:
C4015172
Disease or Syndrome
Sideroblastic anemia with B-cell immunodeficiency, periodic fevers, and developmental delay (SIFD) is an autosomal recessive syndromic disorder characterized by onset of severe sideroblastic anemia in the neonatal period or infancy. Affected individuals show delayed psychomotor development with variable neurodegeneration. Recurrent periodic fevers without an infectious etiology occur throughout infancy and childhood; immunologic work-up shows B-cell lymphopenia and hypogammaglobulinemia. Other more variable features include sensorineural hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa, nephrocalcinosis, and cardiomyopathy. Death in the first decade may occur (summary by Wiseman et al., 2013).
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency, nuclear type 9
MedGen UID:
863690
Concept ID:
C4015253
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 23
MedGen UID:
863884
Concept ID:
C4015447
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-23 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early childhood onset of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and/or neurologic symptoms, including hypotonia and delayed psychomotor development. Laboratory investigations are consistent with a defect in mitochondrial function resulting in lactic acidosis, impaired activities of respiratory complexes I and IV, and defective translation of mitochondrial proteins. Brain imaging shows abnormal lesions in the basal ganglia, thalamus, and brainstem. The severity of the disorder is variable, ranging from death in early infancy to survival into the second decade (summary by Kopajtich et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
TANGO2-Related Metabolic Encephalopathy and Arrhythmias
MedGen UID:
894196
Concept ID:
C4225171
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with TANGO2-related metabolic encephalopathy and arrhythmias can present in acute metabolic crisis (hypoglycemia, elevated lactate, mild hyperammonemia) or with developmental delay, regression, and/or seizures. The acute presentation varies from profound muscle weakness, ataxia, and/or disorientation to a comatose state. Individuals can present with intermittent acute episodes of rhabdomyolysis. The first episode of myoglobinuria has been known to occur as early as age five months. Acute renal tubular damage due to myoglobinuria can result in acute kidney injury and renal failure. During acute illness, transient electrocardiogram changes can be seen; the most common is QT prolongation. Life-threatening recurrent ventricular tachycardia or torsade de pointes occurs primarily during times of acute illness. Individuals who do not present in metabolic crises may present with gait incoordination, progressively unsteady gait, difficulty with speech, or clumsiness. Intellectual disability of variable severity is observed in almost all individuals. Seizures are observed outside the periods of crises in more than 75% of individuals. Hypothyroidism has been reported in more than one third of individuals.
Cardioencephalomyopathy, fatal infantile, due to cytochrome c oxidase deficiency 4
MedGen UID:
905398
Concept ID:
C4225304
Disease or Syndrome
Cytochrome c oxidase deficiency is a genetic condition that can affect several parts of the body, including the muscles used for movement (skeletal muscles), the heart, the brain, or the liver. Signs and symptoms of cytochrome c oxidase deficiency usually begin before age 2 but can appear later in mildly affected individuals.The severity of cytochrome c oxidase deficiency varies widely among affected individuals, even among those in the same family. People who are mildly affected tend to have muscle weakness (myopathy) and poor muscle tone (hypotonia) with no other related health problems. More severely affected people have problems in multiple body systems, often including severe brain dysfunction (encephalomyopathy). Approximately one-quarter of individuals with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency have a type of heart disease that enlarges and weakens the heart muscle (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy). Another possible feature of this condition is an enlarged liver (hepatomegaly), which may lead to liver failure. Most individuals with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency have a buildup of a chemical called lactic acid in the body (lactic acidosis), which can cause nausea and an irregular heart rate, and can be life-threatening.Many people with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency have a specific group of features known as Leigh syndrome. The signs and symptoms of Leigh syndrome include loss of mental function, movement problems, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, eating difficulties, and brain abnormalities. Cytochrome c oxidase deficiency is one of the many causes of Leigh syndrome.Many individuals with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency do not survive past childhood, although some individuals with mild signs and symptoms live into adolescence or adulthood.
Lipoyltransferase 1 deficiency
MedGen UID:
904073
Concept ID:
C4225379
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 31
MedGen UID:
934628
Concept ID:
C4310661
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-31 is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC), global developmental delay, and severe hypotonia. More variable features include seizures, cataract, and abnormal movements. The disorder becomes apparent soon after birth or in early infancy, and patients may die in early childhood. Biochemical studies are consistent with a defect in mitochondrial function (summary by Eldomery et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Encephalopathy, progressive, early-onset, with brain edema and/or leukoencephalopathy
MedGen UID:
934642
Concept ID:
C4310675
Disease or Syndrome
Early-onset progressive encephalopathy with brain edema and/or leukoencephalopathy (PEBEL) is an autosomal recessive severe neurometabolic disorder characterized by rapidly progressive neurologic deterioration that is usually associated with a febrile illness. Affected infants tend to show normal early development followed by acute psychomotor regression with ataxia, hypotonia, respiratory insufficiency, and seizures, resulting in coma and death in the first years of life. Brain imaging shows multiple abnormalities, including brain edema and signal abnormalities in the cortical and subcortical regions (summary by Kremer et al., 2016).
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 12a (cardiomyopathic type), autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
934643
Concept ID:
C4310676
Disease or Syndrome
MTDPS12A is characterized by severe hypotonia due to mitochondrial dysfunction apparent at birth. Affected infants have respiratory insufficiency requiring mechanical ventilation and have poor or no motor development. Many die in infancy, and those that survive have profound hypotonia with significant muscle weakness and inability to walk independently. Some patients develop hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Muscle samples show mtDNA depletion and severe combined mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies (summary by Thompson et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mtDNA depletion syndromes, see MTDPS1 (603041).
Hydrops, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia
MedGen UID:
934728
Concept ID:
C4310761
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 30
MedGen UID:
934740
Concept ID:
C4310773
Disease or Syndrome
Pseudo-torch syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1373355
Concept ID:
C4479376
Disease or Syndrome
Pseudo-TORCH syndrome-2 is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by antenatal onset of intracranial hemorrhage, calcification, brain malformations, liver dysfunction, and often thrombocytopenia. Affected individuals tend to have respiratory insufficiency and seizures, and die in infancy. The phenotype resembles the sequelae of intrauterine infection, but there is no evidence of an infectious agent. The disorder results from inappropriate activation of the interferon (IFN) immunologic pathway (summary by Meuwissen et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PTORCH, see PTORCH1 (251290).

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Fowler C, Cserti-Gazdewich C, Dhabangi A, Musoke C, Sharma H, Amr SS, Dzik W
Malar J 2018 Dec 13;17(1):467. doi: 10.1186/s12936-018-2618-5. PMID: 30545357Free PMC Article
Mao Y, Dai D, Jin H, Wang Y
Medicine (Baltimore) 2018 Sep;97(36):e12114. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000012114. PMID: 30200095Free PMC Article
Liu R, Wang SM, Li ZY, Yu W, Zhang HP, Zhou FQ
J Surg Res 2018 Jun;226:173-180. Epub 2018 Feb 22 doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2018.01.018. PMID: 29661284
Mori N, Kamimura Y, Kimura Y, Hirose S, Aoki Y, Bito S
Eur J Clin Pharmacol 2018 Apr;74(4):405-411. Epub 2017 Dec 8 doi: 10.1007/s00228-017-2377-1. PMID: 29222713
Connelly PJ, Lonergan M, Soto-Pedre E, Donnelly L, Zhou K, Pearson ER
Diabetes Obes Metab 2017 Nov;19(11):1579-1586. Epub 2017 Jul 5 doi: 10.1111/dom.12978. PMID: 28432751Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Sayyed AH, Aleem A, Al-Katari MS, Algahtani F, Aljerian K, Aleem TA, Alsaleh K
Am J Case Rep 2018 Apr 17;19:453-457. PMID: 29662049Free PMC Article
Liu R, Wang SM, Li ZY, Yu W, Zhang HP, Zhou FQ
J Surg Res 2018 Jun;226:173-180. Epub 2018 Feb 22 doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2018.01.018. PMID: 29661284
Cheng CN, Lin SW, Wu CC
J Infect Chemother 2018 Oct;24(10):841-844. Epub 2018 Mar 1 doi: 10.1016/j.jiac.2018.02.002. PMID: 29503228
Mori N, Kamimura Y, Kimura Y, Hirose S, Aoki Y, Bito S
Eur J Clin Pharmacol 2018 Apr;74(4):405-411. Epub 2017 Dec 8 doi: 10.1007/s00228-017-2377-1. PMID: 29222713
Dean RK, Subedi R, Gill D, Nat A
Am J Emerg Med 2017 Aug;35(8):1214.e5-1214.e6. Epub 2017 May 15 doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2017.05.016. PMID: 28539246

Therapy

Mao Y, Dai D, Jin H, Wang Y
Medicine (Baltimore) 2018 Sep;97(36):e12114. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000012114. PMID: 30200095Free PMC Article
Wang Y, Huang Y, Yang J, Zhou FQ, Zhao L, Zhou H
Mil Med Res 2018 Apr 26;5(1):13. doi: 10.1186/s40779-018-0160-y. PMID: 29695298Free PMC Article
Cheng CN, Lin SW, Wu CC
J Infect Chemother 2018 Oct;24(10):841-844. Epub 2018 Mar 1 doi: 10.1016/j.jiac.2018.02.002. PMID: 29503228
Mori N, Kamimura Y, Kimura Y, Hirose S, Aoki Y, Bito S
Eur J Clin Pharmacol 2018 Apr;74(4):405-411. Epub 2017 Dec 8 doi: 10.1007/s00228-017-2377-1. PMID: 29222713
Connelly PJ, Lonergan M, Soto-Pedre E, Donnelly L, Zhou K, Pearson ER
Diabetes Obes Metab 2017 Nov;19(11):1579-1586. Epub 2017 Jul 5 doi: 10.1111/dom.12978. PMID: 28432751Free PMC Article

Prognosis

Fowler C, Cserti-Gazdewich C, Dhabangi A, Musoke C, Sharma H, Amr SS, Dzik W
Malar J 2018 Dec 13;17(1):467. doi: 10.1186/s12936-018-2618-5. PMID: 30545357Free PMC Article
Mao Y, Dai D, Jin H, Wang Y
Medicine (Baltimore) 2018 Sep;97(36):e12114. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000012114. PMID: 30200095Free PMC Article
Wang Y, Huang Y, Yang J, Zhou FQ, Zhao L, Zhou H
Mil Med Res 2018 Apr 26;5(1):13. doi: 10.1186/s40779-018-0160-y. PMID: 29695298Free PMC Article
Mori N, Kamimura Y, Kimura Y, Hirose S, Aoki Y, Bito S
Eur J Clin Pharmacol 2018 Apr;74(4):405-411. Epub 2017 Dec 8 doi: 10.1007/s00228-017-2377-1. PMID: 29222713
Connelly PJ, Lonergan M, Soto-Pedre E, Donnelly L, Zhou K, Pearson ER
Diabetes Obes Metab 2017 Nov;19(11):1579-1586. Epub 2017 Jul 5 doi: 10.1111/dom.12978. PMID: 28432751Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Fowler C, Cserti-Gazdewich C, Dhabangi A, Musoke C, Sharma H, Amr SS, Dzik W
Malar J 2018 Dec 13;17(1):467. doi: 10.1186/s12936-018-2618-5. PMID: 30545357Free PMC Article
Mao Y, Dai D, Jin H, Wang Y
Medicine (Baltimore) 2018 Sep;97(36):e12114. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000012114. PMID: 30200095Free PMC Article
Wang Y, Huang Y, Yang J, Zhou FQ, Zhao L, Zhou H
Mil Med Res 2018 Apr 26;5(1):13. doi: 10.1186/s40779-018-0160-y. PMID: 29695298Free PMC Article
Liu R, Wang SM, Li ZY, Yu W, Zhang HP, Zhou FQ
J Surg Res 2018 Jun;226:173-180. Epub 2018 Feb 22 doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2018.01.018. PMID: 29661284
Mori N, Kamimura Y, Kimura Y, Hirose S, Aoki Y, Bito S
Eur J Clin Pharmacol 2018 Apr;74(4):405-411. Epub 2017 Dec 8 doi: 10.1007/s00228-017-2377-1. PMID: 29222713

Recent systematic reviews

Bianchetti DGAM, Amelio GS, Lava SAG, Bianchetti MG, Simonetti GD, Agostoni C, Fossali EF, Milani GP
Pediatr Nephrol 2018 Apr;33(4):673-681. Epub 2017 Dec 7 doi: 10.1007/s00467-017-3844-8. PMID: 29218437
Yeh HC, Ting IW, Tsai CW, Wu JY, Kuo CC
BMC Nephrol 2017 Jul 10;18(1):229. doi: 10.1186/s12882-017-0640-4. PMID: 28693440Free PMC Article
Renda F, Mura P, Finco G, Ferrazin F, Pani L, Landoni G
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci 2013 Feb;17 Suppl 1:45-9. PMID: 23436666
Salpeter SR, Greyber E, Pasternak GA, Salpeter EE
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2010 Apr 14;(4):CD002967. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD002967.pub4. PMID: 20393934
Salpeter SR, Greyber E, Pasternak GA, Salpeter Posthumous EE
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2010 Jan 20;(1):CD002967. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD002967.pub3. PMID: 20091535

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