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1.

Hypokalemic periodic paralysis 1

Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOKPP) is a condition in which affected individuals may experience paralytic episodes with concomitant hypokalemia (<2.5 mmol/L), and occasionally may develop late-onset proximal myopathy. The paralytic attacks are characterized by reversible flaccid paralysis usually leading to paraparesis or tetraparesis but typically sparing the respiratory muscles and heart. Acute paralytic crises usually last at least several hours and sometimes days. Some individuals have only one episode in a lifetime; more commonly, crises occur repeatedly: daily, weekly, monthly, or less often. The major triggering factors are carbohydrate-rich meals and rest after exercise; rarely, cold-induced hypokalemic paralysis has been reported. The interval between crises may vary and may be prolonged by preventive treatment with potassium salts or acetazolamide. The age of onset of the first attack ranges from one to 20 years; the frequency of attacks is highest between ages 15 and 35 and then decreases with age. A variable myopathy develops in at least 25% of affected individuals and may result in a progressive fixed muscle weakness that manifests at variable ages as exercise intolerance predominantly in the lower limbs. It may occur independent of paralytic symptoms and may be the sole manifestation of HOKPP. Individuals with HOKPP are at increased risk for pre- or post-anesthetic weakness and may be at an increased risk for malignant hyperthermia – though not as great a risk as in individuals with true autosomal dominant malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
811387
Concept ID:
C3714580
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility type 5

Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle calcium regulation associated with uncontrolled skeletal muscle hypermetabolism. Manifestations of malignant hyperthermia (MH) are precipitated by certain volatile anesthetics (i.e., halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, enflurane), either alone or in conjunction with a depolarizing muscle relaxant (specifically, succinylcholine). The triggering substances release calcium stores from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and may promote entry of calcium from the myoplasm, causing contracture of skeletal muscles, glycogenolysis, and increased cellular metabolism, resulting in production of heat and excess lactate. Affected individuals experience: acidosis, hypercapnia, tachycardia, hyperthermia, muscle rigidity, compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis with subsequent increase in serum creatine kinase (CK) concentration, hyperkalemia with a risk for cardiac arrhythmia or even arrest, and myoglobinuria with a risk for renal failure. In nearly all cases, the first manifestations of MH (tachycardia and tachypnea) occur in the operating room; however, MH may also occur in the early postoperative period. There is mounting evidence that some affected individuals will also develop MH with exercise and/or on exposure to hot environments. Without proper and prompt treatment with dantrolene sodium, mortality is extremely high. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
418958
Concept ID:
C2930984
Pathologic Function
3.

Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis

Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is a sporadic muscle disorder characterized by episodic attacks of weakness associated with hypokalemia in individuals with hyperthyroidism. The paralysis resolves upon treatment of hyperthyroidism. The disorder is most common among males of Asian descent, including Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Filipino, and Koreans, although it occurs less commonly in individuals of Caucasian background. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is clinically similar to hereditary hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOKPP; 170400), but the paralysis in TTPP occurs only in the presence of hyperthyroidism. TTPP can also be precipitated by factors that result in hypokalemia, such as carbohydrate ingestion and rest after exercise (review by Kung, 2006). Genetic Heterogeneity of Thyrotoxic Periodic Paralysis See also TTPP2 (613239), conferred by variation in the KCNJ18 gene (613236) on chromosome 17p11, and TTPP3 (614834), mapped to chromosome 17q24. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
120639
Concept ID:
C0268446
Disease or Syndrome
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