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Thin upper lip vermilion

MedGen UID:
355352
Concept ID:
C1865017
Finding
Synonyms: Decreased height of upper lip vermilion; Decreased volume of upper lip; Decreased volume of upper lip vermilion; Thin red part of the upper lip; Thin upper lip; Thin upper lips; Thin vermilion border of upper lip
 
HPO: HP:0000219

Definition

Height of the vermilion of the upper lip in the midline more than 2 SD below the mean. Alternatively, an apparently reduced height of the vermilion of the upper lip in the frontal view (subjective). [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVThin upper lip vermilion

Conditions with this feature

Glycogen storage disease type III
MedGen UID:
6641
Concept ID:
C0017922
Disease or Syndrome
Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III) is characterized by variable liver, cardiac muscle, and skeletal muscle involvement. GSD IIIa is the most common subtype, present in about 85% of affected individuals; it manifests with liver and muscle involvement. GSD IIIb, with liver involvement only, comprises about 15% of all GSD III. In infancy and early childhood, liver involvement presents as ketotic hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, hyperlipidemia, and elevated hepatic transaminases. In adolescence and adulthood, liver disease becomes less prominent. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy develops in the majority of those with GSD IIIa, usually during childhood. Its clinical significance ranges from asymptomatic in the majority to severe cardiac dysfunction, congestive heart failure, and (rarely) sudden death. Skeletal myopathy manifesting as weakness is not usually evident in childhood, but slowly progresses, typically becoming prominent in the third to fourth decade.
Prader-Willi syndrome
MedGen UID:
46057
Concept ID:
C0032897
Disease or Syndrome
Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by severe hypotonia and feeding difficulties in early infancy, followed in later infancy or early childhood by excessive eating and gradual development of morbid obesity (unless eating is externally controlled). Motor milestones and language development are delayed. All individuals have some degree of cognitive impairment. A distinctive behavioral phenotype (with temper tantrums, stubbornness, manipulative behavior, and obsessive-compulsive characteristics) is common. Hypogonadism is present in both males and females and manifests as genital hypoplasia, incomplete pubertal development, and, in most, infertility. Short stature is common (if not treated with growth hormone); characteristic facial features, strabismus, and scoliosis are often present.
Congenital cleft larynx and Opitz-Frias syndrome
MedGen UID:
104493
Concept ID:
C0175696
Disease or Syndrome
Robinow syndrome
MedGen UID:
78535
Concept ID:
C0265205
Disease or Syndrome
A rare autosomal recessive or dominant inherited disorder. The autosomal recessive form is caused by mutations in the ROR2 gene. There is no causative mutation identified for the autosomal dominant form. It is manifested with short limbs, abnormal facial features, underdeveloped genitalia, and wedge-shaped vertebrae.
Miller Dieker syndrome
MedGen UID:
78538
Concept ID:
C0265219
Disease or Syndrome
PAFAH1B1-associated lissencephaly includes Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS), isolated lissencephaly sequence (ILS), and (rarely) subcortical band heterotopia (SBH). Lissencephaly and SBH are cortical malformations caused by deficient neuronal migration during embryogenesis. Lissencephaly refers to a "smooth brain" with absent gyri (agyria) or abnormally wide gyri (pachygyria). SBH refers to a band of heterotopic gray matter located just beneath the cortex and separated from it by a thin zone of normal white matter. MDS is characterized by lissencephaly, typical facial features, and severe neurologic abnormalities. ILS is characterized by lissencephaly and its direct sequelae: developmental delay, intellectual disability, and seizures.
Femoral hypoplasia - unusual facies syndrome
MedGen UID:
120523
Concept ID:
C0265263
Disease or Syndrome
Femoral-facial syndrome (FFS), also known as femoral hypoplasia-unusual facies syndrome (FHUFS), is a rare and sporadic multiple congenital anomaly syndrome comprising bilateral femoral hypoplasia and characteristic facial features, such as long philtrum, thin upper lip, micrognathia with or without cleft palate, upward-slanting palpebral fissures, and a short nose with broad tip. Other features, such as renal anomalies, are more variable (summary by Nowaczyk et al., 2010).
Pallister-Killian syndrome
MedGen UID:
120540
Concept ID:
C0265449
Disease or Syndrome
Pallister-Killian syndrome is a dysmorphic condition involving most organ systems, but also characterized by a tissue-limited mosaicism; most fibroblasts have 47 chromosomes with an extra small metacentric chromosome, whereas the karyotype of lymphocytes is normal. The extra metacentric chromosome is an isochromosome for part of the short arm of chromosome 12: i(12)(p10) (Peltomaki et al., 1987; Warburton et al., 1987).
13q partial monosomy syndrome
MedGen UID:
120541
Concept ID:
C0265451
Disease or Syndrome
A rare syndrome that is characterized by the partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 13. Signs and symptoms include low birth weight, craniofacial malformations, hands and feet malformations, and mental and psychomotor retardation.
Adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency
MedGen UID:
78641
Concept ID:
C0268126
Disease or Syndrome
Adenylosuccinase deficiency is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by an enzymatic defect in de novo purine synthesis (DNPS) pathway. ADSL deficiency leads to the accumulation of toxic intermediates, including succinyladenosine (S-Ado) and succinylaminoimidazole carboxamide riboside (SAICAr) in body fluids. There are 3 major phenotypic forms of the disorder that correlate with different values of the S-Ado and SAICAr concentration ratios (S-Ado/SAICAr) in the cerebrospinal fluid. These include the most severe fatal neonatal encephalopathy (S-Ado/SAICAr ratio less than 1); childhood form (type I) with severe psychomotor retardation (S-Ado/SAICAr ratio close to 1), and a milder form (type II) with psychomotor retardation or hypotonia (S-Ado/SAICAr ratio greater than 2) (summary by Baresova et al., 2012).
Histidine transport defect
MedGen UID:
82825
Concept ID:
C0268642
Disease or Syndrome
An increased concentration of histidine in the urine.
De Lange syndrome
MedGen UID:
78752
Concept ID:
C0270972
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth retardation (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hirsutism, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nose with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS.
Symphalangism-brachydactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
90977
Concept ID:
C0342282
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple synostoses syndrome is characterized by multiple joint fusions, usually commencing in the hands, conductive deafness, and characteristic facial features, including a broad, tubular-shaped nose and a thin upper vermilion. Other features include brachydactyly, hypoplastic or absent middle phalanges, radial head dislocation, and pectus carinatum (summary by Takahashi et al., 2001). Genetic Heterogeneity of Multiple Synostoses Syndrome Other forms of multiple synostoses syndrome include SYNS2 (610017), caused by mutation in the GDF5 gene (601146) on chromosome 20q11; SYNS3 (612961), caused by mutation in the FGF9 gene (600921) on chromosome 13q12; and SYNS4 (617898), caused by mutation in the GDF6 gene (601147) on chromosome 8q22.
Sialuria
MedGen UID:
137980
Concept ID:
C0342853
Disease or Syndrome
Sialuria is a rare inborn error of metabolism in which excessive free sialic acid is synthesized. Clinical features include hepatosplenomegaly, coarse facial features, and varying degrees of developmental delay (summary by Enns et al., 2001).
Carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type I
MedGen UID:
138111
Concept ID:
C0349653
Disease or Syndrome
PMM2-CDG (CDG-Ia) (previously known as congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1a), the most common of a group of disorders of abnormal glycosylation of N-linked oligosaccharides, is divided into three types: infantile multisystem, late-infantile and childhood ataxia-intellectual disability, and adult stable disability. The three types notwithstanding, clinical presentation and course are highly variable, ranging from infants who die in the first year of life to mildly involved adults. Clinical presentations tend to be similar in sibs. In the infantile multisystem type, infants show axial hypotonia, hyporeflexia, esotropia, and developmental delay. Feeding problems, vomiting, failure to thrive, and impaired growth are frequently seen. Subcutaneous fat may be excessive over the buttocks and suprapubic region. Two distinct clinical presentations are observed: (1) a non-fatal neurologic form with strabismus, psychomotor retardation, and cerebellar hypoplasia in infancy followed by neuropathy and retinitis pigmentosa in the first or second decade and (2) a neurologic-multivisceral form with approximately 20% mortality in the first year of life. The late-infantile and childhood ataxia-intellectual disability type, with onset between age three and ten years, is characterized by hypotonia, ataxia, severely delayed language and motor development, inability to walk, and IQ of 40 to 70; other findings include seizures, stroke-like episodes or transient unilateral loss of function, retinitis pigmentosa, joint contractures, and skeletal deformities. In the adult stable disability type, intellectual ability is stable; peripheral neuropathy is variable, thoracic and spinal deformities progress, and premature aging is observed; females lack secondary sexual development and males may exhibit decreased testicular volume. Hyperglycemia-induced growth hormone release, hyperprolactinemia, insulin resistance, and coagulopathy may occur. An increased risk for deep venous thrombosis is present.
Trichorhinophalangeal dysplasia type I
MedGen UID:
140929
Concept ID:
C0432233
Disease or Syndrome
Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS) comprises TRPS I (caused by a heterozygous pathogenic variant in TRPS1) and TRPS II (caused by contiguous gene deletion of TRPS1, RAD21, and EXT1). Both types of TRPS are characterized by distinctive facial features; ectodermal features (fine, sparse, depigmented, and slow growing hair; dystrophic nails; and small breasts); and skeletal findings (short stature; short feet; brachydactyly with ulnar or radial deviation of the fingers; and early, marked hip dysplasia). TRPS II is characterized by multiple osteochondromas (typically first observed clinically on the scapulae and around the elbows and knees between ages 1 month and 6 years) and an increased risk of mild-to-moderate intellectual disability.
Deletion of long arm of chromosome 18
MedGen UID:
96605
Concept ID:
C0432443
Disease or Syndrome
A condition in which some or all of the cells of the body contain extra genetic material from chromosome 18. Clinical features of this condition may include the following: spina bifida, hearing loss, cleft lip, cleft palate, undescended testes, rocker bottom feet, micrognathia, low set ears, cardiac anomalies (ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, tetralogy of Fallot), intellectual disability, holoprosencephaly, pituitary dysplasia, seizures, autoimmune disorders, hip dysplasia, and/or congenital cataracts.
Recombinant chromosome 8 syndrome
MedGen UID:
167070
Concept ID:
C0795822
Disease or Syndrome
Recombinant 8 syndrome is a condition that involves heart and urinary tract abnormalities, moderate to severe intellectual disability, and a distinctive facial appearance. The characteristic facial features include a wide, square face; a thin upper lip; a downturned mouth; a small chin (micrognathia); wide-set eyes (hypertelorism); and low-set or unusually shaped ears. People with recombinant 8 syndrome may have overgrowth of the gums (gingival hyperplasia) and abnormal tooth development. Males with this condition frequently have undescended testes (cryptorchidism). Some affected individuals have recurrent ear infections (otitis media) or hearing loss. Many children with recombinant 8 syndrome do not survive past early childhood, usually due to complications related to their heart abnormalities.
Chromosome 9, monosomy 9p
MedGen UID:
167073
Concept ID:
C0795830
Disease or Syndrome
Partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9 with mental retardation, craniofacial anomalies, abnormal dermatoglyphics, short and webbed neck, heart murmurs, square nails, and other defects.
Fine-Lubinsky syndrome
MedGen UID:
163198
Concept ID:
C0795941
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with characteristics of psychomotor delay, brachycephaly with flat face, small nose, microstomia, cleft palate, cataract, hearing loss, hypoplastic scrotum and digital anomalies. Less than 10 patients have been described in the literature so far. Although the majority of reported cases were sporadic, the syndrome has been reported in one pair of siblings (a brother and sister) with an apparently autosomal recessive inheritance pattern.
Mental retardation-hypotonic facies syndrome X-linked, 1
MedGen UID:
167093
Concept ID:
C0796003
Disease or Syndrome
The term 'X-linked mental retardation-hypotonic facies syndrome' comprises several syndromes previously reported separately. These include Juberg-Marsidi, Carpenter-Waziri, Holmes-Gang, and Smith-Fineman-Myers syndromes as well as 1 family with X-linked mental retardation with spastic paraplegia. All these syndromes were found to be caused by mutation in the XH2 gene and are characterized primarily by severe mental retardation, dysmorphic facies, and a highly skewed X-inactivation pattern in carrier women (Abidi et al., 2005). Other more variable features include hypogonadism, deafness, renal anomalies, and mild skeletal defects. X-linked alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome (ATR-X; 301040) is an allelic disorder with a similar phenotype with the addition of alpha-thalassemia and Hb H inclusion bodies in erythrocytes.
Peters plus syndrome
MedGen UID:
163204
Concept ID:
C0796012
Disease or Syndrome
Peters plus syndrome is characterized by anterior chamber eye anomalies, short limbs with broad distal extremities, characteristic facial features, cleft lip/palate, and variable developmental delay/intellectual disability. The most common anterior chamber defect is Peters' anomaly, consisting of central corneal clouding, thinning of the posterior cornea, and iridocorneal adhesions. Cataracts and glaucoma are common. Developmental delay is observed in about 80% of children; intellectual disability can range from mild to severe.
X-linked mental retardation with marfanoid habitus syndrome
MedGen UID:
167096
Concept ID:
C0796022
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of MED12-related disorders, which is still being defined, includes at a minimum the phenotypes of FG syndrome type 1 (FGS1), Lujan syndrome (LS), and X-linked Ohdo syndrome. FGS1 and LS share the clinical findings of cognitive impairment, hypotonia, and abnormalities of the corpus callosum. FGS1 is further characterized by absolute or relative macrocephaly, tall forehead, downslanted palpebral fissures, small and simple ears, constipation and/or anal anomalies, broad thumbs and halluces, and characteristic behavior. LS is further characterized by large head, tall thin body habitus, long thin face, prominent nasal bridge, high narrow palate, and short philtrum. Carrier females in families with FGS1 and LS are typically unaffected. X-linked Ohdo syndrome (referred to as XLOS in this GeneReview) is characterized by intellectual disability, blepharophimosis, and facial coarsening. A number of individuals with nonsyndromic intellectual disability – including some affected females – have been described.
Intellectual deficit Buenos-Aires type
MedGen UID:
167102
Concept ID:
C0796080
Disease or Syndrome
A rare intellectual disability syndrome with characteristics of growth retardation, microcephaly, characteristic facial features (including narrow forehead, bushy eyebrows, hypertelorism, small, downward-slanting palpebral fissures with blepharoptosis, malformed and low-set ears, broad straight nose, thin upper lip and a wide, tented mouth), developmental delay, intellectual disability, speech disorder, and multiple organ malformations (e.g. ventricular septal defect, megaloureter, dilated renal pelvis). Additional manifestations reported include neurocutaneous lesions (including palmoplantar hyperkeratosis), internal hydrocephalus, and bilateral partial soft-tissue syndactyly of second and third toe.
Myhre syndrome
MedGen UID:
167103
Concept ID:
C0796081
Disease or Syndrome
Myhre syndrome is a connective tissue disorder with multisystem involvement, progressive and proliferative fibrosis that may occur spontaneously or following trauma or surgery, mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, and in some instances, autistic-like behaviors. Organ systems primarily involved include: cardiovascular (congenital heart defects, long- and short-segment stenosis of the aorta and peripheral arteries, pericardial effusion, constrictive pericarditis, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and hypertension); respiratory (choanal stenosis, laryngotracheal narrowing, obstructive airway disease, or restrictive pulmonary disease), gastrointestinal (pyloric stenosis, duodenal strictures, severe constipation); and skin (thickened particularly on the hands and extensor surfaces). Additional findings include distinctive craniofacial features and skeletal involvement (intrauterine growth restriction, short stature, limited joint range of motion). To date, 55 individuals with molecularly confirmed Myhre syndrome have been reported.
Renpenning syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
208670
Concept ID:
C0796135
Disease or Syndrome
Renpenning syndrome is an X-linked mental retardation syndrome with clinically recognizable features. Affected individuals have microcephaly, short stature, small testes, and dysmorphic facies, including tall narrow face, upslanting palpebral fissures, abnormal nasal configuration, cupped ears, and short philtrum. The nose may appear long or bulbous, with overhanging columella. Less consistent manifestations include ocular colobomas, cardiac malformations, cleft palate, and anal anomalies. Stevenson et al. (2005) proposed that the various X-linked mental retardation syndromes due to PQBP1 mutations be combined under the name of Renpenning syndrome.
Mental retardation 30, X-linked
MedGen UID:
163235
Concept ID:
C0796237
Disease or Syndrome
Nonsyndromic mental retardation with microcephaly, restlessness, and hyperactivity.
Brooks Wisniewski Brown syndrome
MedGen UID:
208682
Concept ID:
C0796272
Disease or Syndrome
A rare X-linked intellectual disability syndrome with characteristics of failure to thrive, speech delay, intellectual disability, muscle hypotonia, spastic diplegia, optic atrophy with myopia and distinct facial features (including triangular face, bifrontal narrowness, deeply set eyes, low-set/cupped ears, prominent nose, short philtrum, and thin upper lip with tented morphology) that can be evident from birth. Additional manifestations reported in some patients include large joint contractures and pectus excavatum (which become more evident with age) and seizures.
Andersen Tawil syndrome
MedGen UID:
327586
Concept ID:
C1563715
Disease or Syndrome
Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) is characterized by a triad of: episodic flaccid muscle weakness (i.e., periodic paralysis); ventricular arrhythmias and prolonged QT interval; and anomalies including low-set ears, widely spaced eyes, small mandible, fifth-digit clinodactyly, syndactyly, short stature, and scoliosis. Affected individuals present in the first or second decade with either cardiac symptoms (palpitations and/or syncope) or weakness that occurs spontaneously following prolonged rest or following rest after exertion. Mild permanent weakness is common. Mild learning difficulties and a distinct neurocognitive phenotype (i.e., deficits in executive function and abstract reasoning) have been described.
Opitz G/BBB syndrome
MedGen UID:
321463
Concept ID:
C1801950
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have a range of findings including the following: Congenital heart disease (74% of individuals), particularly conotruncal malformations (tetralogy of Fallot, interrupted aortic arch, ventricular septal defect, and truncus arteriosus). Palatal abnormalities (69%), particularly velopharyngeal incompetence, submucosal cleft palate, bifid uvula, and cleft palate. Characteristic facial features (present in the majority of individuals of northern European heritage). Learning difficulties (70%-90%). An immune deficiency (regardless of the clinical presentation) (77%). Additional findings include the following: Hypocalcemia (50%). Significant feeding and swallowing problems; constipation with or without structural gastrointestinal anomalies (intestinal malrotation, imperforate anus, and Hirschsprung disease). Renal anomalies (31%). Hearing loss (both conductive and sensorineural). Laryngotracheoesophageal anomalies. Growth hormone deficiency. Autoimmune disorders. Seizures (idiopathic or associated with hypocalcemia). CNS anomalies including tethered cord. Skeletal abnormalities (scoliosis with or without vertebral anomalies, clubbed feet, polydactyly, and craniosynostosis). Ophthalmologic abnormalities (strabismus, posterior embryotoxon, tortuous retinal vessels, scleracornea, and anophthalmia). Enamel hypoplasia. Malignancies (rare). Developmental delay (in particular delays in emergence of language), intellectual disability, and learning differences (non-verbal learning disability where the verbal IQ is significantly greater than the performance IQ) are common. Autism or autistic spectrum disorder is found in approximately 20% of children and psychiatric illness (specifically schizophrenia) is present in 25% of adults; however, attention deficit disorder, anxiety, perseveration, and difficulty with social interactions are also common.
Congenital muscular hypertrophy-cerebral syndrome
MedGen UID:
315658
Concept ID:
C1802395
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth retardation (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hirsutism, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nose with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS.
Ayme-gripp syndrome
MedGen UID:
371416
Concept ID:
C1832812
Disease or Syndrome
Ayme-Gripp syndrome is a clinically homogeneous phenotype characterized by congenital cataracts, sensorineural hearing loss, intellectual disability, seizures, brachycephaly, a distinctive flat facial appearance, and reduced growth (Niceta et al., 2015).
Timothy syndrome
MedGen UID:
331395
Concept ID:
C1832916
Disease or Syndrome
Timothy syndrome is a multisystem disorder characterized by cardiac, hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features. Typical cardiac findings include a rate-corrected QT interval >480 ms, functional 2:1 AV block with bradycardia, tachyarrhythmias, and congenital heart defects (patent ductus arteriosus, patent foramen ovale, ventricular septal defect, tetralogy of Fallot, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy). The diagnosis of Timothy syndrome is generally made within the first few days of life although it may be suspected prenatally due to 2:1 AV block or bradycardia in the fetus. Hand/foot findings are unilateral or bilateral cutaneous syndactyly variably involving fingers two (index), three (middle), four (ring), and five (little) and bilateral cutaneous syndactyly of toes two and three. Facial findings include depressed nasal bridge, low-set ears, thin vermilion border of the upper lip, and round face. Neuropsychiatric involvement includes global developmental delays and autism spectrum disorders. Ventricular tachyarrhythmia is the leading cause of death, followed by infection and complications of intractable hypoglycemia. Average age of death is 2.5 years.
Microcephaly with or without chorioretinopathy, lymphedema, or mental retardation
MedGen UID:
320559
Concept ID:
C1835265
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly with or without chorioretinopathy, lymphedema, or mental retardation is an autosomal dominant disorder that involves an overlapping but variable spectrum of central nervous system and ocular developmental anomalies. Microcephaly ranges from mild to severe and is often associated with mild to moderate developmental delay and a characteristic facial phenotype with upslanting palpebral fissures, broad nose with rounded tip, long philtrum with thin upper lip, prominent chin, and prominent ears. Chorioretinopathy is the most common eye abnormality, but retinal folds, microphthalmia, and myopic and hypermetropic astigmatism have also been reported, and some individuals have no overt ocular phenotype. Congenital lymphedema, when present, is typically confined to the dorsa of the feet, and lymphoscintigraphy reveals the absence of radioactive isotope uptake from the webspaces between the toes (summary by Ostergaard et al., 2012). Robitaille et al. (2014) found that MCLMR includes a broader spectrum of ocular disease, including retinal detachment with avascularity of the peripheral retina, and noted phenotypic overlap with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR; see EVR1, 133780). Birtel et al. (2017) observed intrafamilial and intraindividual variability in retinal phenotype, and noted that syndromic manifestations in some patients are too subtle to be detected during a routine ophthalmologic evaluation. Variable expressivity and reduced penetrance have also been observed in some families (Jones et al., 2014; Li et al., 2016). Autosomal recessive forms of microcephaly with chorioretinopathy have been reported (see 251270). See also Mirhosseini-Holmes-Walton syndrome (autosomal recessive microcephaly with pigmentary retinopathy and mental retardation; 268050), which has been mapped to chromosome 8q21.3-q22.1.
Mental retardation with optic atrophy, facial dysmorphism, microcephaly, and short stature
MedGen UID:
324635
Concept ID:
C1836915
Disease or Syndrome
AICAR transformylase/IMP cyclohydrolase deficiency
MedGen UID:
332474
Concept ID:
C1837530
Disease or Syndrome
Fryns macrocephaly
MedGen UID:
373933
Concept ID:
C1838281
Disease or Syndrome
A rare syndrome with features of multiple congenital anomalies with macrocephaly (of post-natal onset), large anterior fontanelle, progressive complex spastic paraplegia, coarse facial features (broad and high forehead, deeply set eyes, short philtrum with thin upper lip, large mouth and prominent incisors), seizures, and intellectual deficit of varying severity. Inheritance appears to be autosomal recessive.
Hermansky Pudlak syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
374912
Concept ID:
C1842362
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1.
Nablus mask-like facial syndrome
MedGen UID:
334165
Concept ID:
C1842464
Disease or Syndrome
Nablus mask-like facial syndrome (NMLFS) is a rare entity defined by distinctive facial features, including blepharophimosis, tight-appearing glistening facial skin, an abnormal hair pattern with an upswept frontal hairline, sparse arched eyebrows, flat and broad nose, long philtrum, distinctive ears, and a happy demeanor (summary by Jain et al., 2010).
Craniolenticulosutural dysplasia
MedGen UID:
334671
Concept ID:
C1843042
Disease or Syndrome
Craniolenticulosutural dysplasia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by facial dysmorphism, late-closing fontanels, cataract, and skeletal defects (summary by Boyadjiev et al., 2011).
Mental retardation, syndromic, Claes-Jensen type, X-linked
MedGen UID:
335139
Concept ID:
C1845243
Disease or Syndrome
Mental retardation X-linked with cerebellar hypoplasia and distinctive facial appearance
MedGen UID:
336920
Concept ID:
C1845366
Disease or Syndrome
Roifman syndrome
MedGen UID:
375801
Concept ID:
C1846059
Disease or Syndrome
Roifman syndrome is a multisystem disorder characterized by growth retardation, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, retinal dystrophy, distinctive facial dysmorphism, and immunodeficiency (summary by de Vries et al., 2006).
Lissencephaly 2, X-linked
MedGen UID:
375832
Concept ID:
C1846171
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked lissencephaly-2 (LISX2) is a developmental disorder characterized by structural brain anomalies, early-onset intractable seizures, severe psychomotor retardation, and ambiguous genitalia. Males are severely affected and often die within the first days or months of life, whereas females may be unaffected or have a milder phenotype (Bonneau et al., 2002). LISX2 is part of a phenotypic spectrum of disorders caused by mutation in the ARX gene comprising a nearly continuous series of developmental disorders ranging from hydranencephaly and lissencephaly to Proud syndrome (300004) to infantile spasms without brain malformations (EIEE1; 308350) to syndromic (309510) and nonsyndromic (300419) mental retardation (Kato et al., 2004; Wallerstein et al., 2008). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lissencephaly, see LIS1 (607432).
Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome, type 2
MedGen UID:
337527
Concept ID:
C1846175
Disease or Syndrome
Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome is a condition that affects many parts of the body and occurs primarily in males. This condition is classified as an overgrowth syndrome, which means that affected infants are considerably larger than normal at birth (macrosomia) and continue to grow and gain weight at an unusual rate. The other signs and symptoms of Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome vary widely. People with mild cases often live into adulthood.People with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome have distinctive facial features including widely spaced eyes (ocular hypertelorism), an unusually large mouth (macrostomia), a large tongue (macroglossia) that may have a deep groove or furrow down the middle, a broad nose with an upturned tip, and abnormalities affecting the roof of the mouth (the palate). The facial features are often described as "coarse" in older children and adults with this condition.Other features of Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome involve the chest and abdomen. Affected infants may be born with one or more extra nipples, an abnormal opening in the muscle covering the abdomen (diastasis recti), a soft out-pouching around the belly-button (an umbilical hernia), or a hole in the diaphragm (a diaphragmatic hernia) that allows the stomach and intestines to move into the chest and crowd the developing heart and lungs.Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome can also cause heart defects, malformed or abnormally large kidneys, an enlarged liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly), and skeletal abnormalities. Additionally, the syndrome can affect the development of the gastrointestinal system, urinary system, and genitalia. Some people with this condition have mild to severe intellectual disability, while others have normal intelligence.About 10 percent of people with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome develop cancerous or noncancerous tumors in early childhood. The most common tumors are a rare form of kidney cancer called Wilms tumor and a cancerous tumor called a neuroblastoma that arises from developing nerve cells.
METHYLMALONIC ACIDURIA AND HOMOCYSTINURIA, cblF TYPE
MedGen UID:
336373
Concept ID:
C1848578
Disease or Syndrome
Disorders of intracellular cobalamin metabolism have a variable phenotype and age of onset that are influenced by the severity and location within the pathway of the defect. The prototype and best understood phenotype is cblC; it is also the most common of these disorders. The age of initial presentation of cblC spans a wide range: In utero with fetal presentation of nonimmune hydrops, cardiomyopathy, and intrauterine growth restriction. Newborns, who can have microcephaly, poor feeding, and encephalopathy. Infants, who can have poor feeding and slow growth, neurologic abnormality, and, rarely, hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Toddlers, who can have poor growth, progressive microcephaly, cytopenias (including megaloblastic anemia), global developmental delay, encephalopathy, and neurologic signs such as hypotonia and seizures. Adolescents and adults, who can have neuropsychiatric symptoms, progressive cognitive decline, thromboembolic compications, and/or subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord.
Insulin-like growth factor 1 resistance to
MedGen UID:
338622
Concept ID:
C1849157
Disease or Syndrome
Patients with mutations in the receptor for insulin-like growth factor I show intrauterine growth retardation and postnatal growth failure, resulting in short stature and microcephaly. Other features may include delayed bone age, developmental delay, and dysmorphic features.
Robinow syndrome, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
341431
Concept ID:
C1849334
Disease or Syndrome
ROR2-related Robinow syndrome is characterized by distinctive craniofacial features, skeletal abnormalities, and other anomalies. Craniofacial features include macrocephaly, broad prominent forehead, low-set ears, ocular hypertelorism, prominent eyes, midface hypoplasia, short upturned nose with depressed nasal bridge and flared nostrils, large and triangular mouth with exposed incisors and upper gums, gum hypertrophy, misaligned teeth, ankyloglossia, and micrognathia. Skeletal abnormalities include short stature, mesomelic or acromesomelic limb shortening, hemivertebrae with fusion of thoracic vertebrae, and brachydactyly. Other common features include micropenis with or without cryptorchidism in males and reduced clitoral size and hypoplasia of the labia majora in females, renal tract abnormalities, and nail hypoplasia or dystrophy. The disorder is recognizable at birth or in early childhood.
Ichthyosis tapered fingers midline groove up
MedGen UID:
342457
Concept ID:
C1850268
Disease or Syndrome
Ectodermal dysplasia syndrome with distinctive facial appearance and preaxial polydactyly of feet
MedGen UID:
342107
Concept ID:
C1851851
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
339902
Concept ID:
C1853099
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth retardation (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hirsutism, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nose with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS.
Mental retardation, microcephaly, growth retardation, joint contractures, and facial dysmorphism
MedGen UID:
342889
Concept ID:
C1853480
Disease or Syndrome
Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome
MedGen UID:
340266
Concept ID:
C1854630
Disease or Syndrome
Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome characterized by hypertrichosis cubiti associated with short stature; consistent facial features, including long eyelashes, thick or arched eyebrows with a lateral flare, wide nasal bridge, and downslanting and vertically narrow palpebral fissures; mild to moderate intellectual disability; behavioral difficulties; and hypertrichosis on the back (summary by Jones et al., 2012 and Miyake et al., 2016).
Kaufman oculocerebrofacial syndrome
MedGen UID:
343403
Concept ID:
C1855663
Disease or Syndrome
Kaufman oculocerebrofacial syndrome (KOS) is characterized by severe intellectual disability and distinctive craniofacial features. Most affected children have prenatal-onset microcephaly, failure to thrive, hypotonia, and short stature. Eye abnormalities are common and can include structural abnormalities (microcornea or microphthalmia, coloboma, optic nerve hypoplasia), refractive errors (myopia ± astigmatism, hyperopia), strabismus, and entropion. Less common findings can include: unilateral or bilateral conductive hearing loss or mixed conductive-sensorineural hearing loss of variable severity; congenital heart defects; breathing problems; feeding difficulties; urogenital abnormalities; and/or skeletal abnormalities.
Baraitser-Winter syndrome
MedGen UID:
340943
Concept ID:
C1855722
Disease or Syndrome
Baraitser-Winter syndrome is a condition that affects the development of many parts of the body, particularly the face and the brain.An unusual facial appearance is the most common characteristic of Baraitser-Winter syndrome. Distinctive facial features can include widely spaced eyes (hypertelorism), large eyelid openings, droopy eyelids (ptosis), high-arched eyebrows, a broad nasal bridge and tip of the nose, a long space between the nose and upper lip (philtrum), full cheeks, and a pointed chin.Structural brain abnormalities are also present in most people with Baraitser-Winter syndrome. These abnormalities are related to impaired neuronal migration, a process by which nerve cells (neurons) move to their proper positions in the developing brain. The most frequent brain abnormality associated with Baraitser-Winter syndrome is pachygyria, which is an area of the brain that has an abnormally smooth surface with fewer folds and grooves. Less commonly, affected individuals have lissencephaly, which is similar to pachygyria but involves the entire brain surface. These structural changes can cause mild to severe intellectual disability, developmental delay, and seizures.Other features of Baraitser-Winter syndrome can include short stature, ear abnormalities and hearing loss, heart defects, presence of an extra (duplicated) thumb, and abnormalities of the kidneys and urinary system. Some affected individuals have limited movement of large joints, such as the elbows and knees, which may be present at birth or develop over time. Rarely, people with Baraitser-Winter syndrome have involuntary muscle tensing (dystonia).
Hyperphosphatasia-intellectual disability syndrome
MedGen UID:
383800
Concept ID:
C1855923
Disease or Syndrome
Mabry syndrome is a condition characterized by intellectual disability, distinctive facial features, increased levels of an enzyme called alkaline phosphatase in the blood (hyperphosphatasia), and other signs and symptoms.People with Mabry syndrome have intellectual disability that is often moderate to severe. They typically have little to no speech development and are delayed in the development of motor skills (such as sitting, crawling, and walking). Many affected individuals have low muscle tone (hypotonia) and develop recurrent seizures (epilepsy) in early childhood. Seizures are usually the generalized tonic-clonic type, which involve muscle rigidity, convulsions, and loss of consciousness.Individuals with Mabry syndrome have distinctive facial features that include wide-set eyes (hypertelorism), long openings of the eyelids (long palpebral fissures), a nose with a broad bridge and a rounded tip, downturned corners of the mouth, and a thin upper lip. These facial features usually become less pronounced over time.Hyperphosphatasia begins within the first year of life in people with Mabry syndrome. There are many different types of alkaline phosphatase found in tissues; the type that is increased in Mabry syndrome is called the tissue non-specific type and is found throughout the body. In affected individuals, alkaline phosphatase levels in the blood are usually increased by one to two times the normal amount, but can be up to 20 times higher than normal. The elevated enzyme levels remain relatively stable over a person's lifetime. Hyperphosphatasia appears to cause no negative health effects, but this finding can help health professionals diagnose Mabry syndrome.Another common feature of Mabry syndrome is shortened bones at the ends of fingers (brachytelephalangy), which can be seen on x-ray imaging. Underdeveloped fingernails (nail hypoplasia) may also occur. Sometimes, individuals with Mabry syndrome have abnormalities of the digestive system, including narrowing or blockage of the anus (anal stenosis or anal atresia) or Hirschsprung disease, a disorder that causes severe constipation or blockage of the intestine. Rarely, affected individuals experience hearing loss.The signs and symptoms of Mabry syndrome vary among affected individuals. Those who are least severely affected have only intellectual disability and hyperphosphatasia, without distinctive facial features or the other health problems listed above.
Urioste Martinez-Frias syndrome
MedGen UID:
343489
Concept ID:
C1856159
Disease or Syndrome
Epidermolysis bullosa, late-onset localized junctional, with mental retardation
MedGen UID:
341663
Concept ID:
C1856969
Disease or Syndrome
Diabetes mellitus, neonatal, with congenital hypothyroidism
MedGen UID:
347541
Concept ID:
C1857775
Disease or Syndrome
Neonatal diabetes mellitus with congenital hypothyroidism (NDH) syndrome is characterized by intrauterine growth retardation and onset of nonimmune diabetes mellitus within the first few weeks of life. Other features include renal parenchymal disease, primarily renal cystic dysplasia, and hepatic disease, with hepatitis in some patients and hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis in others. Facial dysmorphism, when present, consistently involves low-set ears, epicanthal folds, flat nasal bridge, long philtrum, and thin upper lip. Most patients exhibit developmental delay (Dimitri et al., 2015).
Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type 3
MedGen UID:
349167
Concept ID:
C1859439
Disease or Syndrome
Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type 3
MedGen UID:
349899
Concept ID:
C1860823
Disease or Syndrome
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, musculocontractural type
MedGen UID:
356497
Concept ID:
C1866294
Disease or Syndrome
The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of heritable connective tissue disorders that share the common features of skin hyperextensibility, articular hypermobility, and tissue fragility (Beighton et al., 1998). The major characteristics of the musculocontractural form of EDS include distinctive craniofacial dysmorphism, congenital contractures of thumbs and fingers, clubfeet, severe kyphoscoliosis, muscular hypotonia, hyperextensible thin skin with easy bruisability and atrophic scarring, wrinkled palms, joint hypermobility, and ocular involvement (summary by Malfait et al., 2010). Janecke et al. (2015) reviewed the clinical findings in 34 reported EDSMC patients, 31 with CHST14 mutations and 3 with DSE (605942) mutations (see 615539), and stated that the disorder can be recognized based on the presence of distal arthrogryposis, including adducted thumbs or clenched fists and talipes equinovarus, as well as hands with atypically shallow palmar creases and tapering fingers, and neonatal muscular hypotonia. Characteristic craniofacial features include brachycephaly, large fontanel, hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, microcorneae, strabismus, prominent nasolabial folds, short philtrum, thin upper lip, small mouth, high palate, microretrognathia, and prominent and often low-set and posteriorly rotated ears. In addition, EDSMC patients show muscular hypoplasia and weakness, which has been confirmed by ultrasound and electromyography, and intellectual development appears to be normal. Genetic Heterogeneity of Musculocontractural Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Ehlers-Danlos syndrome musculocontractural type 2 (EDSMC2; 615539) is caused by mutation in the DSE gene (605942) on chromosome 6q22.
Mental retardation, autosomal dominant 1
MedGen UID:
409857
Concept ID:
C1969562
Disease or Syndrome
MBD5 haploinsufficiency is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay/intellectual disability (ID), severe speech impairment, seizures, sleep disturbances, and abnormal behaviors. Most children lack speech entirely or have single words, short phrases, or short sentences. Seizures are present in about 80%; onset is usually around age two years. Sleep disturbances, present in about 80% can result in excessive daytime drowsiness. Abnormal behaviors can include autistic-like behaviors (80%) and self-injury and aggression (60%).
Chromosome 10q26 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
436306
Concept ID:
C2674937
Disease or Syndrome
3q29 microdeletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
393265
Concept ID:
C2674949
Disease or Syndrome
3q29 recurrent deletion is characterized by global developmental delay and/or intellectual disability, and commonly, speech delay, and increased risk for neuropsychiatric disorders (including autism spectrum disorder, anxiety disorder, psychosis, and/or schizophrenia). Other common findings are failure to thrive and feeding problems in infancy that persist into childhood, heart defects (especially patent ductus arteriosus), gastrointestinal disorders (including gastroesophageal reflux disease), and dental abnormalities. To date findings in fewer than 50 affected individuals have been reported.
2p15-16.1 microdeletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
390902
Concept ID:
C2675875
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 2p16.1-p15 deletion syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, and variable but distinctive dysmorphic features, including microcephaly, bitemporal narrowing, smooth and long philtrum, hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, broad nasal root, thin upper lip, and high palate. Many patients have behavioral disorders, including autistic features, as well as structural brain abnormalities, such as pachygyria or hypoplastic corpus callosum. Those with deletions including the BCL11A gene (606557) also have persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HbF), which is asymptomatic and does not affected hematologic parameters or susceptibility to infection (summary by Funnell et al., 2015). Point mutation in the BCL11A gene causes intellectual developmental disorder with persistence of fetal hemoglobin (617101), which shows overlapping features. See also fetal hemoglobin quantitative trait locus-5 (HBFQTL5; 142335).
CHROMOSOME 1qter DELETION SYNDROME
MedGen UID:
382926
Concept ID:
C2676727
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 10q23 Deletion Syndrome
MedGen UID:
394203
Concept ID:
C2677102
Disease or Syndrome
Lymphedema, cardiac septal defects, and characteristic facies
MedGen UID:
383042
Concept ID:
C2677167
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome is characterised by congenital lymphoedema of the lower limbs, atrial septal defect and a characteristic facies (a round face with a prominent forehead, a flat nasal bridge with a broad nasal tip, epicanthal folds, a thin upper lip and a cleft chin). It has been described in two brothers and a sister. Transmission appears to be autosomal recessive.
Hunter-MacDonald syndrome
MedGen UID:
383181
Concept ID:
C2677745
Disease or Syndrome
Craniofacioskeletal syndrome
MedGen UID:
394716
Concept ID:
C2678036
Disease or Syndrome
STAR syndrome
MedGen UID:
394424
Concept ID:
C2678045
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with the association of toe syndactyly, facial dysmorphism including telecanthus and a broad nasal tip, urogenital malformations and anal atresia. Around ten cases have been reported so far. The syndrome is caused by mutations in the FAM58A gene (located on the X chromosome) encoding a protein of unknown function.
Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, distal
MedGen UID:
395634
Concept ID:
C2678480
Disease or Syndrome
Fibrosis of extraocular muscles, congenital, 3c
MedGen UID:
412956
Concept ID:
C2750404
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM) refers to at least eight genetically defined strabismus syndromes (CFEOM1A, CFEOM1B, CFEOM2, CFEOM3A, CFEOM3B, CFEOM3C, Tukel syndrome, and CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria) characterized by congenital non-progressive ophthalmoplegia (inability to move the eyes) with or without ptosis (droopy eyelids) affecting part or all of the oculomotor nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve III) and its innervated muscles (superior, medial, and inferior recti, inferior oblique, and levator palpabrae superioris) and/or the trochlear nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve IV) and its innervated muscle (the superior oblique). In general, affected individuals have severe limitation of vertical gaze (usually upgaze) and variable limitation of horizontal gaze. Individuals with CFEOM frequently compensate for the ophthalmoplegia by maintaining abnormal head positions at rest and by moving their heads rather than their eyes to track objects. Individuals with CFEOM3A may also have intellectual disability, social disability, Kallmann syndrome, facial weakness, and vocal cord paralysis; and/or may develop a progressive sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy. Individuals with Tukel syndrome also have postaxial oligodactyly or oligosyndactyly of the hands. Those with CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria also have microcephaly and intellectual disability.
Stargardt macular degeneration absent or hypoplastic corpus callosum mental retardation and dysmorphic features
MedGen UID:
414494
Concept ID:
C2751864
Disease or Syndrome
Faciothoracogenital syndrome
MedGen UID:
443995
Concept ID:
C2931184
Disease or Syndrome
Brachytelephalangy with characteristic facies and kallmann syndrome
MedGen UID:
444052
Concept ID:
C2931421
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 6q11-q14 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
462140
Concept ID:
C3150790
Disease or Syndrome
The cardinal features of chromosome 6q11-q14 interstitial deletions include hypotonia, short stature, skeletal/limb anomalies, umbilical hernia, and urinary tract anomalies, as well as characteristic facial features including upslanting palpebral fissures, low-set and/or dysplastic ears, and high-arched palate (summary by Wang et al., 2009).
Ectodermal dysplasia-syndactyly syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
462159
Concept ID:
C3150809
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 16p12.2-p11.2 deletion syndrome, 7.1- to 8.7-MB
MedGen UID:
462208
Concept ID:
C3150858
Disease or Syndrome
The chromosome 16p12.2-p11.2 deletion syndrome is characterized phenotypically by dysmorphic facial features, feeding difficulties, recurrent ear infections, developmental delay, and cognitive impairment. Additional features, such as heart defects and short stature, are variable (Ballif et al., 2007; Battaglia et al., 2009). The pericentric region of chromosome 16, specifically involving 16p12-p11, is a structurally complex region enriched in repetitive sequence elements, rendering this region susceptible to deletion or rearrangement (Ballif et al., 2007). There are several phenotypes associated with variation in this region: see 611913 for a deletion or duplication at 16p11.2 associated with autism; see 136570 for discussion of a recurrent 520-kb deletion at 16p12.1 associated with developmental delay and craniofacial dysmorphism; and see 613444 for a 220-kb deletion at 16p11.2 associated with isolated severe early-onset obesity and obesity with developmental delay. Battaglia et al. (2009) emphasized that the region at chromosome 16p11.2 that confers susceptibility to autism (AUTS14; see 611913) is located more centromeric to and is distinct from the 16p12.2-p11.2 region involved in the multiple congenital anomalies and intellectual disability phenotype.
Agenesis of the corpus callosum and congenital lymphedema
MedGen UID:
462237
Concept ID:
C3150887
Disease or Syndrome
CHROMOSOME 1p32-p31 DELETION SYNDROME
MedGen UID:
462386
Concept ID:
C3151036
Disease or Syndrome
N-terminal acetyltransferase deficiency
MedGen UID:
477078
Concept ID:
C3275447
Disease or Syndrome
Ogden syndrome is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by postnatal growth failure, severely delayed psychomotor development, variable dysmorphic features, and hypotonia. Most patients also have cardiac malformations or arrhythmias (summary by Popp et al., 2015).
Geleophysic dysplasia 2
MedGen UID:
481684
Concept ID:
C3280054
Disease or Syndrome
Geleophysic dysplasia, a progressive condition resembling a lysosomal storage disorder, is characterized by short stature, short hands and feet, progressive joint limitation and contractures, distinctive facial features, progressive cardiac valvular disease, and thickened skin. Intellect is normal. Major findings are likely to be present in the first year of life. Cardiac, respiratory, and lung involvement result in death before age five years in approximately 33% of individuals with ADAMTSL2-related geleophysic dysplasia.
Macrocephaly, macrosomia, facial dysmorphism syndrome
MedGen UID:
481725
Concept ID:
C3280095
Disease or Syndrome
Mental retardation, autosomal recessive 15
MedGen UID:
481757
Concept ID:
C3280127
Disease or Syndrome
Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy 5
MedGen UID:
482228
Concept ID:
C3280598
Disease or Syndrome
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of short-rib thoracic dysplasia, see SRTD1 (208500).
Coffin-Siris syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
482831
Concept ID:
C3281201
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is classically characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the distal phalanx or nail of the fifth and additional digits, developmental or cognitive delay of varying degree, distinctive facial features, hypotonia, hirsutism/hypertrichosis, and sparse scalp hair. Congenital anomalies can include malformations of the cardiac, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and/or central nervous systems. Other findings commonly include feeding difficulties, slow growth, ophthalmologic abnormalities, and hearing impairment.
Baraitser-Winter Syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
482865
Concept ID:
C3281235
Disease or Syndrome
Baraitser-Winter cerebrofrontofacial (BWCFF) syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by typical craniofacial features and intellectual disability (ID) that ranges from mild (usually in those with normal brain structure) to profound (typically in those with a neuronal migration defect). Many (but not all) affected individuals have iris or retinal coloboma, sensorineural deafness, and muscle wasting resulting in a peculiar stance with kyphosis, anteverted shoulders, and slightly flexed elbows and knees. Seizures, congenital heart defects, and renal malformations also are common.
Hypertelorism and other facial dysmorphism, brachydactyly, genital abnormalities, mental retardation, and recurrent inflammatory episodes
MedGen UID:
766379
Concept ID:
C3553465
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
766431
Concept ID:
C3553517
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth retardation (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hirsutism, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nose with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS.
Mitochondrial pyruvate carrier deficiency
MedGen UID:
766521
Concept ID:
C3553607
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial pyruvate carrier deficiency is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development and lactic acidosis with a normal lactate/pyruvate ratio resulting from impaired mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation (summary by Bricker et al., 2012).
Schuurs-hoeijmakers syndrome
MedGen UID:
767257
Concept ID:
C3554343
Disease or Syndrome
Schuurs-Hoeijmakers syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mental retardation, distinct craniofacial features, and variable additional congenital abnormalities (summary by Schuurs-Hoeijmakers et al., 2016).
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1u
MedGen UID:
767299
Concept ID:
C3554385
Disease or Syndrome
Mental retardation, autosomal dominant 18
MedGen UID:
767362
Concept ID:
C3554448
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant mental retardation-18 is characterized by severe intellectual disability, limited language development, motor delay, and dysmorphic features, including hypertelorism and narrow palpebral fissures (summary by Luo et al., 2017).
Mental retardation, autosomal dominant 19
MedGen UID:
767363
Concept ID:
C3554449
Disease or Syndrome
Mental retardation, autosomal recessive 35
MedGen UID:
767523
Concept ID:
C3554609
Disease or Syndrome
Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome type 1
MedGen UID:
811487
Concept ID:
C3714873
Disease or Syndrome
Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of morphogenesis that results in abnormal development of the anterior segment of the eye, and results in blindness from glaucoma in approximately 50% of affected individuals (Fitch and Kaback, 1978). Systemic anomalies are associated, including dental hypoplasia, failure of involution of periumbilical skin, and maxillary hypoplasia (Alkemade, 1969). Genetic Heterogeneity of Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome Linkage studies indicate that a second type of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome maps to chromosome 13q14 (RIEG2; 601499). A third form of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (RIEG3; 602482) is caused by mutation in the FOXC1 gene (601090) on chromosome 6p25. See 109120 for a form of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome associated with partially absent eye muscles, hydrocephalus, and skeletal abnormalities.
Hypotonia, infantile, with psychomotor retardation and characteristic facies 1
MedGen UID:
815784
Concept ID:
C3809454
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile hypotonia with psychomotor retardation and characteristic facies (IHPRF) is a severe autosomal recessive neurologic disorder with onset at birth or in early infancy. Affected individuals show very poor, if any, normal cognitive development. Some patients are never learn to sit or walk independently (summary by Al-Sayed et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Infantile Hypotonia with Psychomotor Retardation and Characteristic Facies See also IHPRF2 (616801), caused by mutation in the UNC80 gene (612636) on chromosome 2q34; and IHPRF3 (616900), caused by mutation in the TBCK gene (616899) on chromosome 4q24.
Verheij syndrome
MedGen UID:
816353
Concept ID:
C3810023
Disease or Syndrome
Verheij syndrome is characterized by growth retardation, delayed psychomotor development, dysmorphic facial features, and skeletal, mainly vertebral, abnormalities. Additional variable features may include coloboma, renal defects, and cardiac defects (summary by Verheij et al., 2009 and Dauber et al., 2013).
Hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
816684
Concept ID:
C3810354
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation syndrome-4 is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by severely delayed psychomotor development, mental retardation, lack of speech acquisition, seizures, and dysmorphic facial features. Laboratory studies show increased serum alkaline phosphatase (summary by Howard et al., 2014). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HPMRS, see HPMRS1 (239300). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Mental retardation, autosomal dominant 23
MedGen UID:
816736
Concept ID:
C3810406
Disease or Syndrome
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia, type 10
MedGen UID:
862784
Concept ID:
C4014347
Disease or Syndrome
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 10 is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorder characterized by severely delayed psychomotor development, progressive microcephaly, spasticity, seizures, and brain abnormalities, including brain atrophy and delayed myelination. Some patients have dysmorphic features and an axonal sensorimotor neuropathy (summary by Karaca et al., 2014 and Schaffer et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PCH, see PCH1 (607596).
Helsmoortel-van der aa syndrome
MedGen UID:
862975
Concept ID:
C4014538
Disease or Syndrome
ADNP-related intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders (ADNP-related ID/ASD) are characterized by mild to severe intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Of the 24 individuals reported to date, 23 were ascertained in cohorts with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) / intellectual disability (ID); one was identified in a clinical setting. The clinical information available on 12 of the 24 revealed: delayed developmental milestones (walking independently between 19 months and 4.5 years) and speech ranging from no words to sentences. ASD was characterized by stereotypic behavior and impaired social interaction. Other common findings include behavioral problems, sleep disturbance, hypotonia, seizures, feeding difficulties, visual problems (hypermetropia, strabismus, cortical visual impairment), and cardiac defects.
Immunodeficiency 26 with or without neurologic abnormalities
MedGen UID:
863270
Concept ID:
C4014833
Disease or Syndrome
Mental retardation, autosomal dominant 29
MedGen UID:
863578
Concept ID:
C4015141
Disease or Syndrome
Peroxisomal fatty acyl-coa reductase 1 disorder
MedGen UID:
863781
Concept ID:
C4015344
Disease or Syndrome
Peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA reductase-1 disorder is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset in infancy of severely delayed psychomotor development, growth retardation with microcephaly, and seizures. Some patients may have congenital cataracts and develop spasticity later in childhood. Biochemical studies tend to show decreased plasmalogen, consistent with a peroxisomal defect. The disorder is reminiscent of rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (see, e.g., RCDP1, 215100), although the characteristic skeletal abnormalities observed in RCDP are absent (Buchert et al., 2014).
Neurologic, endocrine, and pancreatic disease, multisystem, infantile-onset
MedGen UID:
864165
Concept ID:
C4015728
Disease or Syndrome
AL-RAQAD SYNDROME
MedGen UID:
897610
Concept ID:
C4085595
Disease or Syndrome
Hypotonia, infantile, with psychomotor retardation and characteristic facies 2
MedGen UID:
907651
Concept ID:
C4225203
Disease or Syndrome
UNC80 deficiency is characterized by hypotonia, strabismus, oral motor dysfunction, postnatal growth deficiency, and global developmental delay. The majority of individuals do not learn to walk. All individuals lack expressive language; however, many have expressive body language, and a few have used signs to communicate. Seizures may develop during infancy or childhood. Additional features can include nystagmus, extremity hypertonia, a high-pitched cry, repetitive and self-stimulatory behaviors, constipation, club feet, joint contractures, and scoliosis. For most individuals the UNC80 deficiency syndrome is not progressive. Individuals have slow acquisition of skills and do not have a loss of skills suggestive of neurodegeneration.
Takenouchi-Kosaki syndrome
MedGen UID:
906646
Concept ID:
C4225222
Disease or Syndrome
Takenouchi-Kosaki syndrome is a highly heterogeneous autosomal dominant complex congenital developmental disorder affecting multiple organ systems. The core phenotype includes delayed psychomotor development with variable intellectual disability, dysmorphic facial features, and cardiac, genitourinary, and hematologic or lymphatic defects, including thrombocytopenia and lymphedema. Additional features may include abnormalities on brain imaging, skeletal anomalies, and recurrent infections. Some patients have a milder disease course reminiscent of Noonan syndrome (see, e.g., NS1, 163950) (summary by Martinelli et al., 2018).
Cleft palate, psychomotor retardation, and distinctive facial features
MedGen UID:
895943
Concept ID:
C4225229
Disease or Syndrome
Desanto-shinawi syndrome
MedGen UID:
908218
Concept ID:
C4225239
Disease or Syndrome
WAC-related intellectual disability (ID) is typically characterized by variable degrees of global developmental delay and/or intellectual disability. Behavioral abnormalities including anxiety, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and/or autism spectrum disorder are observed in the majority of older children and adults. Most affected infants have significant but nonspecific features at birth such as neonatal hypotonia and feeding problems. Some affected individuals come to medical attention with respiratory or vision problems. Facial features may be mildly dysmorphic, but are nonspecific. To date, 18 individuals have been identified with WAC-related ID.
Yuan-Harel-Lupski syndrome
MedGen UID:
894862
Concept ID:
C4225255
Disease or Syndrome
Yuan-Harel-Lupski syndrome is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay and early-onset peripheral neuropathy. The disorder comprises features of both demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A; 118220), which results from duplication of the PMP22 gene on 17p12, and Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS; 610883), which results from duplication of a slightly proximal region on 17p11.2 that includes the RAI1 gene. These 2 loci are about 2.5 Mb apart. The resultant YUHAL phenotype may be more severe in comparison to the individual contributions of each gene, with particularly early onset of peripheral neuropathy and features of both central and peripheral nervous system involvement (summary by Yuan et al., 2015).
Smith-Kingsmore syndrome
MedGen UID:
899689
Concept ID:
C4225259
Disease or Syndrome
Smith-Kingsmore syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndromic intellectual disability syndrome characterized by macrocephaly, seizures, umbilical hernia, and facial dysmorphic features including frontal bossing, midface hypoplasia, small chin, hypertelorism with downslanting palpebral fissures, depressed nasal bridge, smooth philtrum, and thin upper lip (Smith et al., 2013; Baynam et al., 2015).
Kosaki overgrowth syndrome
MedGen UID:
896409
Concept ID:
C4225270
Disease or Syndrome
Kosaki overgrowth syndrome is characterized by a facial gestalt involving prominent forehead, proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures, wide nasal bridge, thin upper lip, and pointed chin. Affected individuals are tall, with an elongated lower segment, hands, and feet. Skin is hyperelastic and fragile, and there is progressive neurologic deterioration with white matter lesions on brain imaging (Takenouchi et al., 2015).
Klippel-feil syndrome 4, autosomal recessive, with nemaline myopathy and facial dysmorphism
MedGen UID:
894399
Concept ID:
C4225285
Disease or Syndrome
Klippel-Feil syndrome-4 with nemaline myopathy and facial dysmorphism is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized mainly by severe hypotonia apparent from infancy. Klippel-Feil anomaly is primarily defined by fusion of the cervical spine, with associated low posterior hairline and limited neck mobility being observed in about half of patients (summary by Alazami et al., 2015). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Klippel-Feil syndrome, see KFS1 (118100).
Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 9
MedGen UID:
903881
Concept ID:
C4225303
Disease or Syndrome
Robinow syndrome, autosomal dominant 2
MedGen UID:
897039
Concept ID:
C4225363
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant Robinow syndrome (ADRS) is characterized by skeletal findings (short stature, mesomelic limb shortening predominantly of the upper limbs, and brachydactyly), genital abnormalities (in males: micropenis / webbed penis, hypoplastic scrotum, cryptorchidism; in females: hypoplastic clitoris and labia majora), dysmorphic facial features (widely spaced and prominent eyes, frontal bossing, anteverted nares, midface retrusion), dental abnormalities (including malocclusion, crowding, hypodontia, late eruption of permanent teeth), bilobed tongue, and occasional prenatal macrocephaly that persists postnatally. Less common findings include renal anomalies, radial head dislocation, vertebral abnormalities such as hemivertebrae and scoliosis, nail dysplasia, cardiac defects, cleft lip/palate, and (rarely) cognitive delay. When present, cardiac defects are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. A variant of Robinow syndrome, associated with osteosclerosis and caused by a heterozygous pathogenic variant in DVL1, is characterized by normal stature, persistent macrocephaly, increased bone mineral density with skull osteosclerosis, and hearing loss, in addition to the typical features described above.
Mental retardation, autosomal dominant 32
MedGen UID:
903767
Concept ID:
C4225396
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Mental retardation, X-linked, syndromic 33
MedGen UID:
895979
Concept ID:
C4225418
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked syndromic mental retardation-33 is an X-linked recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features (summary by O'Rawe et al., 2015).
Hypotonia, ataxia, and delayed development syndrome
MedGen UID:
934585
Concept ID:
C4310618
Disease or Syndrome
Hypotonia, ataxia, and delayed development syndrome (HADDS) is a neurodevelopmental syndrome characterized by congenital hypotonia, delayed psychomotor development, variable intellectual disability with speech delay, variable dysmorphic facial features, and ataxia, often associated with cerebellar hypoplasia. Some patients may have urogenital abnormalities (summary by Sleven et al., 2017).
Arthrogryposis, distal, with impaired proprioception and touch
MedGen UID:
934659
Concept ID:
C4310692
Disease or Syndrome
Distal arthrogryposis with impaired proprioception and touch is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by loss of certain mechanosensation modalities resulting in ataxia, difficulty walking, dysmetria, muscle weakness and atrophy, and progressive skeletal contractures. Patients have onset of symptoms in early childhood (summary by Chesler et al., 2016 and Delle Vedove et al., 2016).
ZTTK syndrome
MedGen UID:
934663
Concept ID:
C4310696
Disease or Syndrome
ZTTK syndrome is a severe multisystem developmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development and intellectual disability. Affected individuals have characteristic dysmorphic facial features, hypotonia, poor feeding, poor overall growth, and eye or visual abnormalities. Most patients also have musculoskeletal abnormalities, and some have congenital defects of the heart and urogenital system. Brain imaging usually shows developmental abnormalities such as gyral changes, cortical and/or cerebellar atrophy, and thin corpus callosum (summary by Kim et al., 2016).
Alazami-Yuan syndrome
MedGen UID:
934669
Concept ID:
C4310702
Disease or Syndrome
Okur-chung neurodevelopmental syndrome
MedGen UID:
934706
Concept ID:
C4310739
Disease or Syndrome
Okur-Chung neurodevelopmental syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability with poor speech, behavioral abnormalities, cortical malformations in some patients, and variable dysmorphic facial features. Additional features, including microcephaly, gastrointestinal problems, and low levels of immunoglobulins, may be observed in some patients (Okur et al., 2016).
Coffin-Siris syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
934755
Concept ID:
C4310788
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, coarse facial features, and hypoplasia of the distal phalanges, particularly the fifth digit. Other features may also be observed, including congenital heart defects, hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, and poor overall growth with short stature and microcephaly (summary by Wieczorek et al., 2013). Patients with SMARCE1 mutations have a wide spectrum of manifestations, including severe to moderate intellectual disability and heart defects (summary by Kosho et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Coffin-Siris syndrome, see CSS1 (135900).
Intellectual developmental disorder with persistence of fetal hemoglobin
MedGen UID:
934800
Concept ID:
C4310833
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder with persistence of fetal hemoglobin is characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, variable dysmorphic features, including microcephaly, downslanting palpebral fissures, strabismus, and external ear abnormalities, and asymptomatic persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) (summary by Dias et al., 2016). Many of these features overlap with chromosome 2p16.1-p15 deletion syndrome (612513).
Congenital heart defects, dysmorphic facial features, and intellectual developmental disorder
MedGen UID:
1385307
Concept ID:
C4479246
Disease or Syndrome
CDK13-related disorder, reported in 43 individuals to date, is characterized in all individuals by developmental delay / intellectual disability (DD/ID); nearly all individuals older than age one year display impaired verbal language skills (either absent or restricted speech). Other common findings are recognizable facial features in some individuals, behavioral problems (autism spectrum disorder or autistic traits/stereotypies, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder), feeding difficulties in infancy, structural cardiac defects, and seizures.
Intellectual developmental disorder with gastrointestinal difficulties and high pain threshold
MedGen UID:
1385744
Concept ID:
C4479517
Disease or Syndrome
IDDGIP is an autosomal dominant syndromic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability with speech delay, and behavioral abnormalities. Most patients have variable additional features, including feeding and gastrointestinal difficulties, high pain threshold and/or hypersensitivity to sound, and dysmorphic features, including mild facial abnormalities, strabismus, and small hands and feet (summary by Jansen et al., 2017).
Intellectual developmental disorder with dysmorphic facies, seizures, and distal limb anomalies
MedGen UID:
1375601
Concept ID:
C4479520
Disease or Syndrome
IDDFSDA is an autosomal recessive severe multisystem disorder characterized by poor overall growth, developmental delay, early-onset seizures, intellectual disability, and dysmorphic features. There is phenotypic variability. The most severely affected patients have a neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, absent speech, and inability to walk, and they require feeding tubes. Some patients have congenital heart defects or nonspecific abnormalities on brain imaging. Less severely affected individuals have mild to moderate intellectual disability with normal speech and motor development (summary by Santiago-Sim et al., 2017).

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Wilson C, Playle R, Toma A, Zhurov A, Ness A, Richmond S
Am J Med Genet A 2013 Jan;161A(1):4-12. Epub 2012 Dec 3 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.35515. PMID: 23208817

Diagnosis

Yamamoto T, Shimojima K, Yamazaki S, Ikeno K, Tohyama J
Congenit Anom (Kyoto) 2016 Nov;56(6):253-255. doi: 10.1111/cga.12172. PMID: 27230627
Kosho T
Pediatr Int 2016 Feb;58(2):88-99. doi: 10.1111/ped.12878. PMID: 26646600
Dikow N, Maas B, Gaspar H, Kreiss-Nachtsheim M, Engels H, Kuechler A, Garbes L, Netzer C, Neuhann TM, Koehler U, Casteels K, Devriendt K, Janssen JW, Jauch A, Hinderhofer K, Moog U
Am J Med Genet A 2013 Sep;161A(9):2158-66. Epub 2013 Aug 2 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.36046. PMID: 23913520
Bialer MG, Wilson WG, Kelly TE
Am J Med Genet 1989 Jul;33(3):314-7. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.1320330306. PMID: 2679089

Prognosis

Hamilton MJ, Caswell RC, Canham N, Cole T, Firth HV, Foulds N, Heimdal K, Hobson E, Houge G, Joss S, Kumar D, Lampe AK, Maystadt I, McKay V, Metcalfe K, Newbury-Ecob R, Park SM, Robert L, Rustad CF, Wakeling E, Wilkie AOM, Study TDDD, Twigg SRF, Suri M
J Med Genet 2018 Jan;55(1):28-38. Epub 2017 Oct 11 doi: 10.1136/jmedgenet-2017-104620. PMID: 29021403Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Hamilton MJ, Caswell RC, Canham N, Cole T, Firth HV, Foulds N, Heimdal K, Hobson E, Houge G, Joss S, Kumar D, Lampe AK, Maystadt I, McKay V, Metcalfe K, Newbury-Ecob R, Park SM, Robert L, Rustad CF, Wakeling E, Wilkie AOM, Study TDDD, Twigg SRF, Suri M
J Med Genet 2018 Jan;55(1):28-38. Epub 2017 Oct 11 doi: 10.1136/jmedgenet-2017-104620. PMID: 29021403Free PMC Article
Yamamoto T, Shimojima K, Yamazaki S, Ikeno K, Tohyama J
Congenit Anom (Kyoto) 2016 Nov;56(6):253-255. doi: 10.1111/cga.12172. PMID: 27230627

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