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Parkinson disease 13(PARK13)

MedGen UID:
343992
Concept ID:
C1853202
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
Synonyms: PARK13
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal dominant inheritance
MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Intellectual Product
Sources: HPO, OMIM, Orphanet
Autosomal dominant inheritance refers to genetic conditions that occur when a mutation is present in one copy of a given gene (i.e., the person is heterozygous).
Autosomal dominant inheritance (HPO, OMIM, Orphanet)
 
Gene (location): HTRA2 (2p13.1)
OMIM®: 610297

Disease characteristics

Excerpted from the GeneReview: Parkinson Disease Overview
Parkinsonism refers to all clinical states characterized by tremor, muscle rigidity, slowed movement (bradykinesia) and often postural instability. Parkinson disease is the primary and most common form of parkinsonism. Psychiatric manifestations, which include depression and visual hallucinations, are common but not uniformly present. Dementia eventually occurs in at least 20% of cases. The most common sporadic form of Parkinson disease manifests around age 60; however, young-onset and even juvenile presentations are seen. [from GeneReviews]
Full text of GeneReview (by section):
Summary  |  Definition  |  Causes  |  Evaluation Strategy  |  Genetic Counseling  |  Resources  |  Management  |  References  |  Chapter Notes
Authors:
Janice Farlow  |  Nathan D Pankratz  |  Joanne Wojcieszek, et. al.   view full author information

Additional description

From GHR
Parkinson disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system. The disorder affects several regions of the brain, especially an area called the substantia nigra that controls balance and movement.Often the first symptom of Parkinson disease is trembling or shaking (tremor) of a limb, especially when the body is at rest. Typically, the tremor begins on one side of the body, usually in one hand. Tremors can also affect the arms, legs, feet, and face. Other characteristic symptoms of Parkinson disease include rigidity or stiffness of the limbs and torso, slow movement (bradykinesia) or an inability to move (akinesia), and impaired balance and coordination (postural instability). These symptoms worsen slowly over time.Parkinson disease can also affect emotions and thinking ability (cognition). Some affected individuals develop psychiatric conditions such as depression and visual hallucinations. People with Parkinson disease also have an increased risk of developing dementia, which is a decline in intellectual functions including judgment and memory.Generally, Parkinson disease that begins after age 50 is called late-onset disease. The condition is described as early-onset disease if signs and symptoms begin before age 50. Early-onset cases that begin before age 20 are sometimes referred to as juvenile-onset Parkinson disease.  https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/parkinson-disease

Clinical features

Rigidity
MedGen UID:
7752
Concept ID:
C0026837
Sign or Symptom
Continuous involuntary sustained muscle contraction. When an affected muscle is passively stretched, the degree of resistance remains constant regardless of the rate at which the muscle is stretched. This feature helps to distinguish rigidity from muscle spasticity.
Tremor
MedGen UID:
21635
Concept ID:
C0040822
Sign or Symptom
Tremors are unintentional trembling or shaking movements in one or more parts of your body. Most tremors occur in the hands. You can also have arm, head, face, vocal cord, trunk, and leg tremors. Tremors are most common in middle-aged and older people, but anyone can have them. The cause of tremors is a problem in the parts of the brain that control muscles in the body or in specific parts of the body, such as the hands. They commonly occur in otherwise healthy people. They may also be caused by problems such as. -Parkinson's disease. -Dystonia. -Multiple sclerosis. -Stroke. -Traumatic brain injury. -Alcohol abuse and withdrawal. -Certain medicines. Some forms are inherited and run in families. Others have no known cause. . There is no cure for most tremors. Treatment to relieve them depends on their cause. In many cases, medicines and sometimes surgical procedures can reduce or stop tremors and improve muscle control. Tremors are not life threatening. However, they can be embarrassing and make it hard to perform daily tasks. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.
Bradykinesia
MedGen UID:
115925
Concept ID:
C0233565
Sign or Symptom
Bradykinesia literally means slow movement, and is used clinically to denote a slowness in the execution of movement (in contrast to hypokinesia, which is used to refer to slowness in the initiation of movement).
Parkinsonism with favorable response to dopaminergic medication
MedGen UID:
375989
Concept ID:
C1846868
Disease or Syndrome

Recent clinical studies

Therapy

Cantello R, Riccio A, Gilli M, Delsedime M, Scarzella L, Aguggia M, Bergamasco B
Ital J Neurol Sci 1986 Feb;7(1):139-43. PMID: 3514543

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