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WFS1-Related Disorders(DFNA6)

MedGen UID:
331419
Concept ID:
C1833021
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: DEAFNESS, AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT 14; DEAFNESS, AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT 38; DEAFNESS, AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT 6; DFNA6
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal dominant inheritance
MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Intellectual Product
Sources: HPO, OMIM, Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in heterozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, an autosomal dominant disorder is caused when a single copy of the mutant allele is present. Males and females are affected equally, and can both transmit the disorder with a risk of 50% for each child of inheriting the mutant allele.
Autosomal dominant inheritance (HPO, OMIM, Orphanet)
 
Gene (location): WFS1 (4p16.1)
OMIM®: 600965

Definition

WFS1-related disorders range from Wolfram syndrome (WFS) to WFS1-related low-frequency sensory hearing loss (also known as DFNA6/14/38 low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss [LFSNHL]). WFS is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy before age 16 years, and typically associated with sensorineural hearing loss, progressive neurologic abnormalities (cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, dementia, psychiatric illness, and urinary tract atony), and other endocrine abnormalities. Median age at death is 30 years. WFS-like disease is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, diabetes mellitus, psychiatric illness, and variable optic atrophy. WFS1-related LFSNHL is characterized by congenital, nonsyndromic, slowly progressive, low-frequency (<2000 Hz) sensorineural hearing loss. [from GeneReviews]

Additional description

From OMIM
Low frequency sensorineural hearing loss is an unusual type of hearing loss in which frequencies of 2,000 Hz and below are predominantly affected. Many patients have tinnitus, but there are otherwise no associated features such as vertigo. Because high frequency hearing is generally preserved, LFSNHL patients retain excellent understanding of speech, although presbycusis or noise exposure may cause high frequency loss later in life. LFSNHL worsens over time without progressing to profound deafness; in contrast, low frequency hearing loss linked to DFNA1 (124900), caused by mutations in the DIAPH1 gene (602121), is associated with progression to profound deafness by the fourth decade of life (summary by Bespalova et al., 2001).  http://www.omim.org/entry/600965

Clinical features

From HPO
Progressive sensorineural hearing impairment
MedGen UID:
335894
Concept ID:
C1843156
Disease or Syndrome
A progressive form of sensorineural hearing impairment.
Low-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment
MedGen UID:
816775
Concept ID:
C3810445
Finding
A form of sensorineural hearing impairment that affects primarily the lower frequencies.

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Chaussenot A, Rouzier C, Quere M, Plutino M, Ait-El-Mkadem S, Bannwarth S, Barth M, Dollfus H, Charles P, Nicolino M, Chabrol B, Vialettes B, Paquis-Flucklinger V
Clin Genet 2015 May;87(5):430-9. Epub 2014 Aug 6 doi: 10.1111/cge.12437. PMID: 24890733

Diagnosis

Chaussenot A, Rouzier C, Quere M, Plutino M, Ait-El-Mkadem S, Bannwarth S, Barth M, Dollfus H, Charles P, Nicolino M, Chabrol B, Vialettes B, Paquis-Flucklinger V
Clin Genet 2015 May;87(5):430-9. Epub 2014 Aug 6 doi: 10.1111/cge.12437. PMID: 24890733

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