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Maternal anthropometry and infant feeding practices in Israel in relation to growth in infancy: the North African Infant Feeding Study.

Fawzi WW, et al. Am J Clin Nutr. 1997.

Abstract

Relations between maternal anthropometric status during pregnancy and infant feeding practices and growth from birth through the first 6 mo of life were examined in a cohort of 351 Israeli mother-infant pairs of North African descent. Maternal weight, height, and triceps skinfold thicknesses were determined at 6 and 9 mo of pregnancy, while infants' weights and lengths were measured at birth and at 1, 2, 3, and 6 mo of age with concurrent collection of age-specific maternal-reported infant feeding data. On the basis of multiple-linear-regression analysis that adjusted for potential covariates, mean maternal weight at the first prenatal visit and at 6 and 9 mo of pregnancy were positively associated with birth length (P for trend in all cases < 0.0001) and with linear growth between birth and 1, 3, and 6 mo of age. Maternal skinfold thickness at 9 mo of pregnancy and maternal height were also significantly associated with birth length. Moreover, maternal height, weight, and skinfold thickness at 6 and 9 mo of pregnancy were positively associated with mean birth weight. After adjustment for morbidity in the past month and other covariates, infants breast-fed exclusively had greater attained weight and weight gain in the first 3 mo compared with infants who were bottle-fed exclusively, breast-fed and bottle-fed, or solid-fed exclusively. These findings underscore the need for programs that improve the nutritional status of women before, during, and after pregnancy, and encourage exclusive breast-feeding of infants for at least the first 3 mo of life.

PIP:

The associations between maternal anthropometric measures during pregnancy and infant feeding practices and growth in the first 6 months of life were investigated in a cohort of 351 mother-infant pairs of North African (Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, or Libya) descent but currently residing in Israel's Negev region. Mean maternal weight at the first prenatal visit and at 6 and 9 months of pregnancy was significantly and positively associated with birth length and with linear growth between birth and 1, 3, and 6 months of age. Maternal skinfold thickness at 9 months of pregnancy and maternal height also were significantly associated with birth length, while maternal height, weight, and skinfold thickness at 6 and 9 months of pregnancy were positively associated with mean birth weight. The rate of exclusive breast feeding declined from 34% at 1 month to 18% at 2 months to 6% at 3 months. After adjustment for covariates such as morbidity in the preceding month, maternal anthropometric status, and socioeconomic factors, infants who were exclusively breast-fed had greater attained weight and weight gain in the first 3 months of life than their counterparts who were exclusively bottle-fed, breast- and bottle-fed, or solid-fed. These findings underscore the importance of programs that improve the nutritional status of women before, during, and after pregnancy and promote exclusive breast feeding for at least the first 3 months.

PMID

9174468 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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