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An Update on Fatalities Due to Venomous and Nonvenomous Animals in the United States (2008-2015).

Forrester JA, et al. Wilderness Environ Med. 2018.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: To review recent (2008-2015) United States mortality data from deaths caused by nonvenomous and venomous animals and compare with historical data.

METHODS: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Wide-Ranging Online Data for Epidemiologic Research database was queried to return all animal-related fatalities between 2008 and 2015. Mortality frequencies for animal-related fatalities were calculated using the estimated 2011 United States population. Inclusion criteria included all mortalities that were a consequence of bite, contact, attack, or envenomation (International Classification of Diseases 10th revision codes W53-W59 and X20-X29).

RESULTS: There were 1610 animal-related fatalities, with the majority from nonvenomous animals (4.8 deaths per 10 million persons annually). The largest proportion of animal-related fatalities was due to "other mammals," largely composed of horses and cattle. Deaths attributable to Hymenoptera (hornets, wasps, and bees) account for 29.7% of the overall animal-related fatalities and have been steady over the last 20 years. Dog-related fatality frequencies are stable, although the fatality frequency of 4.6 deaths per 10 million persons among children 4 years of age or younger was nearly 4-fold greater than in the other age groups.

CONCLUSIONS: Appropriate education and prevention measures aimed at decreasing injury from animals should be directed at the high-risk groups of agricultural workers and young children with dogs. Public policy and treatment pricing should align to ensure adequate available medication for those at risk of anaphylaxis from stings from Hymenoptera.

Copyright © 2017 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID

29373216 [Indexed for MEDLINE]

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