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Risk factors for neck and shoulder pain among schoolchildren and adolescents.

Dianat I, et al. J Paediatr Child Health. 2018.

Abstract

AIM: To evaluate the potential risk factors for neck and shoulder pain among schoolchildren.

METHODS: Demographic, physical/leisure activity, school-related and psychosocial factors for neck/shoulder pain were evaluated in a cross-sectional study of 1611 schoolchildren aged 11-14 years.

RESULTS: Neck and shoulder complaints were reported in 27.9 and 19.0% of the sample, respectively. According to multivariate logistic regression models, high desk height (odds ratio (OR) = 2.23, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22-4.07), forward-inclined seat pan (OR = 2.38, 95% CI: 1.40-4.05), time spent (30-60 min/day) carrying school bag (OR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.16-2.23) and psychosocial factors (OR = 1.95, 95% CI: 1.03-3.72) independently increased the risk of neck pain, while low body mass index (OR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.42-0.95) decreased it. Time spent on watching TV (OR = 1.45, 95% CI: 1.02-2.06), backward-inclined seat backrest (OR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.02-2.58), curved seat backrest (OR = 1.80, 95% CI: 1.05-3.08), too much homework (OR = 1.45, 95% CI: 1.03-2.03) and psychosocial factors (conduct problems) (OR = 1.63, 95% CI: 1.07-2.46) independently increased the risk of shoulder pain, while prosocial behaviour (OR = 0.56, 95% CI: 0.35-0.90) decreased it.

CONCLUSION: Both physical and psychosocial factors influenced the risk for neck/shoulder pain in school-aged children, suggesting that they should be considered in assessment and treatment of such symptoms in this population.

© 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

PMID

28782292 [ - in process]

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