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Malondialdehyde as a Prognostic Factor in Alcoholic Hepatitis.

Pérez-Hernández O, et al. Alcohol Alcohol. 2017.

Abstract

Aims: Alcoholic hepatitis is a severe complication of alcoholism, associated with high short-term mortality. Although pathogenesis remains obscure, it is generally accepted that lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine secretion with further generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) play outstanding roles. Prognosis is uncertain, and the usually employed prognostic scores do not include variables related to ROS generation. Therefore, this study was performed to assess short-term prognostic value of cytokines, nutritional status, different scores [Maddrey, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD), albumin, bilirubin, INR, creatinine index (ABIC), Lille, Glasgow, MELD-Na, Child-Pugh] and malondialdehyde (MDA, as an indicator of lipid peroxidation) at admission and after 1 week, among patients affected by severe acute alcoholic hepatitis (Maddrey index >32).

Methods: Sixty-two patients affected by severe acute alcoholic hepatitis, for whom we calculated Maddrey, MELD, ABIC, Lille, Glasgow, MELD-Na, Child-Pugh, and determined serum MDA and interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-4, tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma levels at admission and after 1 week.

Results: Twenty-four patients died during the follow-up period. MDA showed a better prognostic accuracy than the aforementioned scores, both at admission and after 1 week.

Conclusion: Our study supports the importance of including MDA assessment in the prognostic evaluation of patients with alcoholic hepatitis.

Short summary: Alcoholic hepatitis is associated with high short-term mortality. Although not included in prognostic scores, lipid peroxidation plays an outstanding role in its pathogenesis. We found that malondialdehyde levels showed a better prognostic accuracy than the usually employed scores. Therefore, it should be included in the prognostic evaluation of these patients.

© The Author 2016. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

PMID

28007738 [Indexed for MEDLINE]

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