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A structurally normal fetus at the 11- to 14-week ultrasound does not guarantee a newborn without congenital anomalies: a cohort study.

Mario Sarti A Junior, et al. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2016.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of maternal demographic characteristics and abnormal first-trimester sonographic markers on congenital anomalies (CAs) at birth when the fetus is structurally normal at the 11- to 14-week ultrasound.

METHODS: This prospective cohort study comprised high-risk women undergoing routine antenatal care. Detailed assessments of fetal anatomy and first-trimester sonographic markers were performed at 11-14 weeks of pregnancy. Multilevel regression analysis was used to determine the effects of maternal characteristics and abnormal first-trimester sonographic markers on the incidence of CA at birth.

RESULTS: Three hundred and ten patients were evaluated, and 41 patients (13.2%) had an anomalous newborn. The presence of a specific indication at the first-trimester ultrasound (OR: 2.72; CI 95% 1.09-6.74) or a nuchal translucency (NT) thickness greater than 2.5 mm increased the risk of CA at birth by three fold (OR: 3.10; CI 95% 1.07-9.59). High adjusted risks for trisomies 21, 18 and 13 increased the likelihood of having a structurally abnormal newborn by five, twelve and six fold, respectively.

CONCLUSION: Increased NT and/or high adjusted risks for trisomies 21, 18, and 13 increase the risk of CA at birth, even in fetuses with a structurally normal 11- to 14-week ultrasound scan.

PMID

26857452 [Indexed for MEDLINE]

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