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Anti-inflammatory effect of cinnamaldehyde in Helicobacter pylori induced gastric inflammation.

Muhammad JS, et al. Biol Pharm Bull. 2015.

Abstract

Cinnamomum cassia is widely employed for gastrointestinal complaints such as dyspepsia, flatulence, diarrhea, and vomiting. Studies report cinnamaldehyde (CM) as a major active constituent of cinnamon. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of CM on Helicobacter (H.) pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells in order to validate cinnamon traditional use in gastrointestinal (GI)-related disorders. AGS/MKN-45 cells and H. pylori (193C) were employed for co-culture experiments. Anti-H. pylori cytotoxic and anti-adhesion activity of CM were determined. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, real time polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunoblotting were used to measure the effect on interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion/expression. The effect on activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was determined by immunoblot analysis. The non-cytotoxic CM (≤125 µM) was also non-bactericidal at the given time, suggesting the effect in H. pylori/cell co-culture system was not due to alteration in H. pylori viability or the toxicity to the cells. Also, CM did not show any anti-adhesion effect against H. pylori/cell co-culture. However, pre-incubation of the cells with CM significantly inhibited the IL-8 secretion/expression from H. pylori-infected cells (p<0.01). In addition, CM suppressed H. pylori-induced NF-κB activation and prevented degradation of inhibitor (I)-κB This study provides evidence that the anti-inflammatory effect of C. cassia on H. pylori-infected gastric cells is due to blockage of the NF-κB pathway by cinnamaldehyde. This agent can be considered as a potential candidate for in vivo and clinical studies against various H. pylori related gastric pathogenic processes.

PMID

25744466 [Indexed for MEDLINE]

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