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Physical exercise through mountain hiking in high-risk suicide patients. A randomized crossover trial.

Randomized controlled trial
Sturm J, et al. Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The following crossover pilot study attempts to prove the effects of endurance training through mountain hiking in high-risk suicide patients.

METHOD: Participants (n = 20) having attempted suicide at least once and clinically diagnosed with hopelessness were randomly distributed among two groups. Group 1 (n = 10) began with a 9-week hiking phase followed by a 9-week control phase. Group 2 (n = 10) worked vice versa. Assessments included the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Scale of Suicide Ideation (BSI), and maximum physical endurance.

RESULTS: Ten participants of Group 1 and seven participants of Group 2 completed the study. A comparison between conditions showed that, in the hiking phase, there was a significant decrease in hopelessness (P < 0.0001, d = -1.4) and depression (P < 0.0001, d = -1.38), and a significant increase in physical endurance (P < 0.0001, d = 1.0), but no significant effect for suicide ideation (P = 0.25, d = -0.29). However, within the hiking phase, there was a significant decrease in suicide ideation (P = 0.005, d = -0.79).

CONCLUSION: The results suggest that a group experience of regular monitored mountain hiking, organized as an add-on therapy to usual care, is associated with an improvement of hopelessness, depression, and suicide ideation in patients suffering from high-level suicide risk.

© 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

PMID

22486584 [Indexed for MEDLINE]

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