GTR Home > Conditions/Phenotypes > Amyloidogenic transthyretin amyloidosis

Summary

Excerpted from the GeneReview: Hereditary Transthyretin Amyloidosis
Hereditary transthyretin (ATTR) amyloidosis is characterized by a slowly progressive peripheral sensorimotor and/or autonomic neuropathy as well as non-neuropathic changes of cardiomyopathy, nephropathy, vitreous opacities, and CNS amyloidosis. The disease usually begins in the third to fifth decade in persons from endemic foci in Portugal and Japan; onset is later in persons from other areas. Typically, sensory neuropathy starts in the lower extremities with paresthesias and hypesthesias of the feet, followed within a few years by motor neuropathy. In some persons, particularly those with early-onset disease, autonomic neuropathy is the first manifestation of the condition; findings can include: orthostatic hypotension, constipation alternating with diarrhea, attacks of nausea and vomiting, delayed gastric emptying, sexual impotence, anhidrosis, and urinary retention or incontinence. Cardiac amyloidosis is mainly characterized by progressive cardiomyopathy. Individuals with leptomeningeal amyloidosis may have the following CNS findings: dementia, psychosis, visual impairment, headache, seizures, motor paresis, ataxia, myelopathy, hydrocephalus, or intracranial hemorrhage.

Genes See tests for all associated and related genes

  • Also known as: ATTR, CTS, CTS1, HEL111, HsT2651, PALB, TBPA, TTR
    Summary: transthyretin

Clinical features

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Suggested reading

  • Berk et al., 2013
    Repurposing diflunisal for familial amyloid polyneuropathy: a randomized clinical trial.

Practice guidelines

  • ESC, 2014
    2014 ESC Guidelines on diagnosis and management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: the Task Force for the Diagnosis and Management of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

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