GTR Home > Conditions/Phenotypes > Hereditary coproporphyria

Summary

Excerpted from the GeneReview: Hereditary Coproporphyria
Hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) is an acute (hepatic) porphyria in which the acute symptoms are neurovisceral and occur in discrete episodes. Attacks typically start in the abdomen with low-grade pain that slowly increases over a period of days (not hours) with nausea progressing to vomiting. In some individuals, the pain is predominantly in the back or extremities. When an acute attack is untreated, a motor neuropathy may develop over a period of days or a few weeks. The neuropathy first appears as weakness proximally in the arms and legs, then progresses distally to involve the hands and feet. Some individuals experience respiratory insufficiency due to loss of innervation of the diaphragm and muscles of respiration. Acute attacks are associated commonly with use of certain medications, caloric deprivation, and changes in female reproductive hormones. About 20% of those with an acute attack also experience photosensitivity associated with bullae and skin fragility.

Available tests

36 tests are in the database for this condition.

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Genes See tests for all associated and related genes

  • Also known as: COX, CPO, CPX, HCP, CPOX
    Summary: coproporphyrinogen oxidase

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