Table 11aSummary of the impact of health IT applications on process outcomes for patients with hypertension

Study, YearHealth IT ApplicationIntervention ComparedOutcomes MeasurePositive Impact
Fretheim, 200650Clinical decision aids, IT-guided disease managementEducational outreach visit with audit and feedback, and computerized reminders linked to the medical record system vs. passive dissemination of guidelinesThiazides prescription+
CV risk assessment done+
Treatment goal achieved
Green, 200856Communication via email, IT-guided disease management, education via IT, information exchange, telemonitoring systemsBlood pressure monitoring and patient Web services vs. usual careElectronic messaging and subsequent responses+
Telephone encounters+
Blood pressure monitoring and patient Web services and pharmacist care vs. usual careElectronic messaging and subsequent responses+
Telephone encounters+
Blood pressure monitoring and patient Web services vs. usual carePrimary care visits0
Primary care visits0
Hetlevik, 199851Clinical decision aidsCDSS vs. usual careFractions of patients without registration of blood pressure
Fractions of patients without registration of serum cholesterol
Fractions of patients without registration of cigarettes+
Fractions of patients without registration of cardio vascular inheritance
Fractions of patients without registration of BMI+
Fractions of patients without registration of risk score+
Hicks, 200855Clinical decision aidsComputerized support vs. usual carePrescribing Joint National Committee adherent drug class
no data
Mitchell, 200454IT-guided disease management, electronic medical recordsAudit only practices vs. patients who received no feedbackAll patients with no recorded blood pressure
All patients with no recorded blood pressure+
Patients receiving audit plus strategic practices (patient-specific list ranking patients with risk of death from stroke) vs. patients receiving no feedbackFinal proportion with controlled blood pressure in hypertensive patients
All patients with no recorded blood pressure+
Montgomery, 200053Clinical decision aidsRisk chart alone vs. usual careNumber of patients with 0–1 classes of drugs prescribed0
Number of patients with 2 classes of drugs prescribed+
Number of patients with >=3 classes of drugs prescribed+
CDSS plus risk chart vs. usual careNumber of patients with 0–1 classes of drugs prescribed
Number of patients with 3 classes of drugs prescribed
Number of patients with >=3 classes of drugs prescribed
Parati, 200957Computer-assisted self-care, telemedicine, telemonitoring systemsTeletransmitted home blood pressure vs. usual careFrequency of treatment changes+
Health care costs+
Teletransmitted home blood pressure vs. patients that received usual careFrequency of treatment changes+
Health care costs+
Roumie, 200652Communication via email, education via IT, information exchangeProvider who received email message and alert vs. provider who received only the email message.Drug added
Both increased dose and drug added+
Provider who received email message, alert and patient education vs. provider who received only the email messageDrug added+
Both increased dose and drug added
Santamore, 200885TelemedicineBlood pressure measurements transmitted through an Internet based telemedicine system vs. not through a telemedicine systemPercent error for similarity between telemedicine recorded systolic blood pressure and recorded systolic blood pressureInsufficient data
Percent error for similarity between telemedicine recorded diastolic blood pressure and recorded diastolic blood pressureInsufficient data
Blood pressure monitoring+

BMI: Body Mass Index, CDSS: Clinical Decision Support System, CV: Cardiovascular, E-mail: Electronic Mail, IT: Information Technology

*

“+” indicates that the intervention had a positive effect on the outcome in comparison with the control

“−” indicates that the intervention had a negative effect on the outcome in comparison with the control

“0” indicates that the intervention had no effect on the outcome in comparison with the control

From: Results

Cover of Enabling Patient-Centered Care Through Health Information Technology
Enabling Patient-Centered Care Through Health Information Technology.
Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments, No. 206.
Finkelstein J, Knight A, Marinopoulos S, et al.

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