FIGURE 9.1. S-shaped curve that is typically obtained for a TOJ task and a bell-shaped curve typically obtained in a simultaneity task (SJ).

FIGURE 9.1

S-shaped curve that is typically obtained for a TOJ task and a bell-shaped curve typically obtained in a simultaneity task (SJ). Stimuli from different modalities are presented at varying SOAs, ranging from clear auditory-first (A-first) to clear vision-first (V-first). In a TOJ task, the participant’s task is to judge which stimulus comes first, sound or light, whereas in a SJ task, subjects judge whether stimuli are synchronous or not. The PSS represents the interval at which information from different modalities is perceived as being maximally simultaneous (∼0 ms). In a SJ task, this is the point at which the most synchronous responses are given; in TOJ task, it is the point at which 50% of responses is vision-first and 50% is auditory-first. The JND represents the smallest interval observers can reliably notice (in this example ∼27 ms). In a SJ task, this is the average interval (of A-first and V-first) at which a participant responds with 75% synchronous responses. In a TOJ task, it is the difference in SOA at 25% and 75% point divided by two.

From: Chapter 9, Perception of Synchrony between the Senses

Cover of The Neural Bases of Multisensory Processes
The Neural Bases of Multisensory Processes.
Murray MM, Wallace MT, editors.
Boca Raton (FL): CRC Press/Taylor & Francis; 2012.
Copyright © 2012 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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