FIGURE 3.2. Illustration of two conditioned responses that could produce conditioned cue preference.

FIGURE 3.2

Illustration of two conditioned responses that could produce conditioned cue preference. Rats are trained by placing them into one compartment with a reinforcer (e.g., food, drug injection) and into the other compartment with no reinforcer an equal number of times. The doors to the connecting tunnel are closed, confining the rats to the compartments during these trials. After several training trials the rats are given a preference test by placing them in the connecting tunnel with the doors to the compartments open. The gray arrows illustrate the two conditioned responses. Conditioned approach would attract the rat into the paired compartment when it sees the conditioned stimuli in that compartment from the tunnel. In the absence of this response the rat explores the apparatus, eventually entering the paired compartment, bringing it into contact with the conditioned stimuli. Conditioned reward elicited by those stimuli would instrumentally reinforce the response of entering the compartment. Both of these conditioned responses would increase a rat’s tendency to enter and remain in the reinforcer-paired compartment, resulting in the observed preference. See text for further discussion.

From: Chapter 3, Reward: What Is It? How Can It Be Inferred from Behavior?

Cover of Neurobiology of Sensation and Reward
Neurobiology of Sensation and Reward.
Gottfried JA, editor.
Boca Raton (FL): CRC Press/Taylor & Francis; 2011.
Copyright © 2011 by Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

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