Slide 10. What is known about compliance with follow-up for a positive test and for post-polypectomy surveillance?

Slide 10What is known about compliance with follow-up for a positive test and for post-polypectomy surveillance?

SLIDE 10 NOTES: All studies were regional; there are no national data on follow-up. The majority of studies reviewed by Dr. Yabroff and her colleagues were conducted in clinics, programs, or health care systems that had mechanisms for tracking follow-up care (Yabroff et al., 2003; Bastani et al., under review). The actual prevalence of follow-up may be lower outside of organized systems of care or for the uninsured.

A study by Myers and colleagues (Myers et al., 2001) compared measurement of complete diagnostic evaluation after a positive FOBT by 4 methods – external chart review, internal chart audit, administrative data review, and a combination of chart review and administrative data notes – and found that rates ranged from 49 to 79%. Regardless of how measured, prevalence is less than optimal and may compromise the effectiveness of mass screening programs. We do not know the impact of delayed, incomplete, or no follow-up on stage of disease at diagnosis because population-based data on follow-up care are not routinely collected.

Dr. Yabroff and her colleagues conclude that: “Increasing the availability of screening follow-up data will be an important area for future evaluations of the quality of care provided in screening programs.”

To my knowledge, there are no published data of post-polypectomy surveillance.

From: Appendix L, Current Evidence on Compliance

Cover of Economic Models of Colorectal Cancer Screening in Average-Risk Adults
Economic Models of Colorectal Cancer Screening in Average-Risk Adults: Workshop Summary.
Institute of Medicine (US); National Research Council (US); Pignone M, Russell L, Wagner J, editors.
Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2005.
Copyright © 2005, National Academy of Sciences.

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