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This publication is provided for historical reference only and the information may be out of date.

Cover of Whole-Body Vibration Therapy for Osteoporosis

Whole-Body Vibration Therapy for Osteoporosis

Comparative Effectiveness Technical Briefs, No. 10

Investigators: , MPP, , MBA, PhD, , MD, MS, and , MD.

Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center
Rockville (MD): Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US); .
Report No.: 11(12)-EHC083-EF

Structured Abstract

Background:

Osteoporosis is a skeletal system disease characterized by low bone density and deterioration of bone tissue. Current clinical guidelines recommend dietary and pharmacological interventions and weight-bearing exercise to treat osteoporosis and prevent bone fractures, but these interventions sometimes have low adherence and can cause adverse side effects. Whole-body vibration therapy has been proposed as an alternative or adjunctive intervention, but its role in preventing and treating osteoporosis, and the populations in which it has been studied, is unclear.

Purpose:

To provide an overview of the key issues and evidence map related to the use of whole-body vibration therapy for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

Methods:

A review of the published and grey literature and interviews with Key Informants.

Findings:

Very little scientific evidence evaluates the benefits and harms of whole-body vibration therapy for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis; only 12 studies met the inclusion criteria for our review. A number of questions regarding the optimal population for treatment, optimal treatment protocol, key outcome measures, and whether whole-body vibration therapy is an adjunctive or distinctive therapy emerged from the published literature and key informant discussions. Reviewed studies offered little information on potential harms. However, safety concerns emerged from key informant discussions, including unknown long-term harms from the use of whole-body vibration therapy, and the potential inability of consumers to clearly distinguish low-intensity platforms intended for osteoporosis therapy from platforms intended for high intensity exercise. Claims about whole-body vibration therapy for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis cannot be made without further research.

Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,1 Contract No. HHSA 290 2007 10064 1. Prepared by: Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Suggested citation:

Wysocki A, Butler M, Shamliyan T, Kane RL. Whole-Body Vibration Therapy for Osteoporosis. Technical Brief No. 10. (Prepared by the University of Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. HHSA 290 2007 10064 1.) AHRQ Publication No. 11(12)-EHC083-EF. Rockville, MD. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; November 2011. Available at: http://www.effectivehealthcare.gov/reports/final.cfm.

This report is based on research conducted by the Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) under contract to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Rockville, MD (Contract No. HHSA 290 2007 10064 1). The findings and conclusions in this document are those of the authors, who are responsible for its contents; the findings and conclusions do not necessarily represent the views of AHRQ. Therefore, no statement in this report should be construed as an official position of AHRQ or of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The information in this report is intended to help health care decision makers—patients and clinicians, health system leaders, and policymakers, among others—make well-informed decisions and thereby improve the quality of health care services. This report is not intended to be a substitute for the application of clinical judgment. Anyone who makes decisions concerning the provision of clinical care should consider this report in the same way as any medical reference and in conjunction with all other pertinent information, i.e., in the context of available resources and circumstances presented by individual patients.

This report may be used, in whole or in part, as the basis for development of clinical practice guidelines and other quality enhancement tools, or as a basis for reimbursement and coverage policies. AHRQ or U.S. Department of Health and Human Services endorsement of such derivative products may not be stated or implied.

None of the investigators has any affiliations or financial involvement that conflicts with the material presented in this report.

1

540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850; www‚Äč.ahrq.gov,

Bookshelf ID: NBK83043PMID: 22238804

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