Box 19Non-English journal titles

  • For non-English journal titles appearing in the roman alphabet (French, German, Spanish, Italian, etc.), provide the name in the original language. Abbreviate it according to the Abbreviation rules for journal titles and capitalize all remaining words, including abbreviations. Indicate the language of the article after the journal title.
    • Sante Ment Que. French. Forthcoming 2006.
  • For a journal title in a non-roman alphabet:
    • Romanize (write in the roman alphabet) the title if it is in Cyrillic, Greek, Arabic, Hebrew, or Korean. Abbreviate it according to the Abbreviation rules for journal titles and capitalize all remaining words, including abbreviations. Indicate the language of the article after the journal title.
      • Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. Russian. Forthcoming 2006.
      • Refuat Hapeh Vehashinayim. Hebrew. Forthcoming 2006.
    • Romanize titles in a character-based language (Chinese, Japanese). Do not abbreviate any of the words or omit any words; use the capitalization system of the particular language. Indicate the language of the article after the journal title.
      • Nihon Ishigaku Zasshi. Japanese. Forthcoming 2006.
      • Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue. Chinese. Forthcoming 2015.
      • It is not NLM practice, but you may translate journal titles in character-based languages. If you do, abbreviate the title according to the Abbreviation rules for journal titles and indicate the language of the article after the journal title.
        • Chin Crit Care Med. Chinese. Forthcoming 2015.
      • A good authority for romanization is the ALA-LC Romanization Tables.
  • Ignore diacritics, accents, and special characters in titles. This rule ignores some conventions used in non-English languages to simplify rules for English-language publications.
    • Treat a letter marked with diacritics or accents as if it were not marked
      • Å   treated as   A
      • Ø   treated as   O
      • Ç   treated as   C
      • Ł   treated as   L
      • à   treated as   a
      • ĝ   treated as   g
      • ñ   treated as   n
      • ü   treated as   u
    • Treat two or more letters printed as a unit (ligated letters) as if they were two letters
      • æ   treated as   ae
      • œ   treated as   oe

From: Chapter 11, Forthcoming ("in press")

Cover of Citing Medicine
Citing Medicine: The NLM Style Guide for Authors, Editors, and Publishers [Internet]. 2nd edition.
Patrias K, author; Wendling D, editor.
Bethesda (MD): National Library of Medicine (US); 2007-.

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