Figure 6. Firing and cross-correlation of two sensory unit- auditory and visual- when their input is changed during slow wave sleep.

Figure 6

Firing and cross-correlation of two sensory unit- auditory and visual- when their input is changed during slow wave sleep. Top, single recordings of the hippocampus (Hipp), the unitary discharge and the digitised signals. Sound and flash stimulation (Stim) represent the synchronizing pulses. Bottom, four cross-correlations performed on the data sets limited by vertical lines in the above traces. Both are showing a change from the no phase locked condition to a temporal correlation (phase locking) with the hippocampal theta rhythm, when a shift in the sensory input occurred. Whereas the auditory cortical unit (A1) phase locked to the hippocampal theta only when the sound stimulation began, the visual neurone showed the opposite phenomenon. The lateral geniculate neuron exhibited no phase locking to the theta when the flashes of light were present. With the flashes off, the correlation with hippocampal theta appeared (Modified from Velluti and Pedemonte, 2002).

From: Sleep Hippocampal Theta Rhythm and Sensory Processing

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