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Cover of Alcohol and Other Drug Screening of Hospitalized Trauma Patients

Alcohol and Other Drug Screening of Hospitalized Trauma Patients

Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series, No. 16

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Rockville (MD): Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (US); .
Report No.: (SMA) 95-3039

This TIP Alcohol and Other Drug Screening of Hospitalized Trauma Patients examines the extensive role that alcohol and other drug abuse plays in traumatic injury. The costs of injury to both individuals and society are high. In financial terms, the annual direct and indirect costs of providing care for injured persons are higher than the costs of care for persons with cancer or heart disease. Persons who sustain one injury are at greatly increased risk of reinjuring themselves and others. Untreated substance use disorders are thought to be the cause of a large portion of reinjury. For these and other reasons, the consensus panel recommends universal alcohol and drug screening of injured patients ages 14 and older upon hospital admission.

Contents

This publication is part of the Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant technical assistance program. This publication was written under contract number ADM 270-91-0007 from the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Sandra Clunies, MS, served as the CSAT Government project officer, and Roberta Messalle was the Government content advisor. Text development was provided by Carl Leukefeld, DSW Writers were Carolyn Davis, Joni Eisenberg, Constance Gartner, Randi Henderson, and Deborah Shuman.

The opinions expressed herein are the views of the consensus panel members and do not reflect the official position of CSAT or any other part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). No official support or endorsement of CSAT or DHHS for these opinions or for particular instruments or software that may be described in this document is intended or should be inferred. The guidelines proffered in this document should not be considered as substitutes for individualized patient care and treatment decisions.

Bookshelf ID: NBK64574PMID: 22514821

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