Figure 1. This figure illustrates the Darwinian model of speciation which starts from the single origin producing one clone that is separated by an obstacle into two groups which subsequently accumulate random mutations so that they become sufficiently different from each other that they could no longer interbreed if they were brought together again.

Figure 1

This figure illustrates the Darwinian model of speciation which starts from the single origin producing one clone that is separated by an obstacle into two groups which subsequently accumulate random mutations so that they become sufficiently different from each other that they could no longer interbreed if they were brought together again. This scenario repeats any number of times, splitting the original clone into all of the fauna and flora that we observed today. The critical point brought out by this picture is that once a species is divided, both branches should change to an equal extent if random processes are involved. Note that the Darwinian hypothesizers have overlooked that fact.

From: Molecular Geneology

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