TABLE 3.5Recommended Minimum Space for Nonhuman Primates Housed in Pairs or Groups*

AnimalsWeight,a kgFloor area/animal,b ft2 (m2)Height,c in. (cm)Comments
Monkeysd (including baboons)Cage height should be sufficient for the animals to comfortably stand erect with their feet on the floor. Baboons, patas monkeys, and other longer-legged species may require more height than other monkeys, as might long-tailed animals and animals with prehensile tails. Overall cage volume and linear perch space should be considerations for many neotropical and arboreal species. For brachiating species cage height should be such that an animal can, when fully extended, swing from the cage ceiling without having its feet touch the floor. Cage design should enhance brachiating movement.
Group 1Up to 1.52.1 (0.20)30 (76.2)
Group 2Up to 33.0 (0.28)30 (76.2)
Group 3Up to 104.3 (0.4)30 (76.2)
Group 4Up to 156.0 (0.56)32 (81.3)
Group 5Up to 208.0 (0.74)36 (91.4)
Group 6Up to 2510 (0.93)46 (116.8)
Group 7Up to 3015 (1.40)46 (116.8)
Group 8>30e≥25 (≥2.32)60 (152.4)
Chimpanzees (Pan)For other apes and large brachiating species cage height should be such that an animal can, when fully extended, swing from the cage ceiling without having its feet touch the floor. Cage design should enhance brachiating movement.
JuvenilesUp to 1015 (1.4)60 (152.4)
Adultsf>10≥25 (≥2.32)84 (213.4)
*

The interpretation of this table should take into consideration the performance indices described in the text beginning on page 55.

a

To convert kilograms to pounds, multiply by 2.2.

b

Singly housed primates may require more space than the amount allocated per animal when group housed.

c

From cage floor to cage top.

d

Callitrichidae, Cebidae, Cercopithecidae, and Papio.

e

Larger animals may require more space to meet performance standards (see text).

f

Apes weighing over 50 kg are more effectively housed in permanent housing of masonry, concrete, and wire-panel structure than in conventional caging.

From: 3, Environment, Housing, and Management

Cover of Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals
Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. 8th edition.
National Research Council (US) Committee for the Update of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals.
Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2011.
Copyright © 2011, National Academy of Sciences.

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