FIGURE 10.7. Schematic overview of the mechanisms underlying the high palatability of dietary fats.

FIGURE 10.7

Schematic overview of the mechanisms underlying the high palatability of dietary fats. When animals eat dietary fats, sensory signals such as taste, smell, and texture are transmitted to the brain. The taste signal from the tongue is especially important for palatability. Triacylglycerols in the dietary fat are digested by the lingual lipase on the tongue and release FAs, which, by binding to FA receptors such as CD36 or GPR120, send a signal to the brain through the taste nerve. After ingestion of fat, information about their caloric content is collected by peripheral organs and transmitted to the brain through still unknown mechanisms. This information is integrated in the brain and elicits the rewarding or reinforcing effect for fat.

From: Chapter 10, Preference for High-Fat Food in Animals

Cover of Fat Detection
Fat Detection: Taste, Texture, and Post Ingestive Effects.
Montmayeur JP, le Coutre J, editors.
Boca Raton (FL): CRC Press/Taylor & Francis; 2010.
Copyright © 2010, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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