FIGURE 3.2. Chronic increases in muscular activity stimulate angiogenesis in rat skeletal muscle.

FIGURE 3.2

Chronic increases in muscular activity stimulate angiogenesis in rat skeletal muscle. Control (A) and stimulated (B) anterior tibialis muscles were taken from contralateral limbs of the same rat. The peroneal motor nerve was stimulated for 2-h periods followed by 4-h periods of rest for 30 days. Stimulation parameters were 10-Hz, 300-µs square wave pulses, and 3–5 V. The 30 days of stimulation converted the predominantly fast-twitch, glycolytic anterior tibialis muscle (A) to a predominantly slow-twitch, oxidative muscle (B) with increased capillarity and decreased fiber diameter as shown. The muscles were perfused-fixed with glutaraldehyde at physiological blood pressures. These are 1-µm-thick plastic sections taken from the same location of each muscle. Bar = 50 µm (T.H. Adair, unpublished data).

From: Chapter 3, Regulation: Metabolic Factors

Cover of Angiogenesis
Angiogenesis.
Adair TH, Montani JP.
San Rafael (CA): Morgan & Claypool Life Sciences; 2010.
Copyright © 2010 by Morgan & Claypool Life Sciences.

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