FIGURE 11.7. Proportion of increase in central venous pressure (CVP) transmitted to sinusoidal pressure.

FIGURE 11.7

Proportion of increase in central venous pressure (CVP) transmitted to sinusoidal pressure. A data point at, for example, 5.75-mmHg CVP represents the percentage of pressure rise from 5.5 to 6.0 mmHg CVP that was transferred to the sinusoids. Note that even very small elevations in CVP are partially transmitted upstream to the sinusoids. The percentage of transmission for small elevations in central venous pressure is low but rises as the distending pressure of the central venous pressure leads to distention of the hepatic sphincter and a resultant decrease in sphincter resistance. Active vasoconstriction affects this relationship by reducing the percent transmission at each point. Reprinted from Lautt WW, Greenway CV, Legare DJ. Effect of hepatic nerves, norepinephrine, angiotensin, elevated central venous pressure on postsinusoidal resistance sites and intrahepatic pressures in cats. Microvasc Res, vol. 33, no. 1, p. 57. © 1987 by Academic Press. (This figure from publication Microvasc Res is reproduced with permission of publisher Academic Press).

From: Chapter 11, Hepatic Nerves

Cover of Hepatic Circulation
Hepatic Circulation: Physiology and Pathophysiology.
Lautt WW.
San Rafael (CA): Morgan & Claypool Life Sciences; 2009.
Copyright © 2010 by Morgan & Claypool Life Sciences.

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