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Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. DSM-5 Changes: Implications for Child Serious Emotional Disturbance [Internet]. Rockville (MD): Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (US); 2016 Jun.

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DSM-5 Changes: Implications for Child Serious Emotional Disturbance [Internet].

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Table 23DSM-IV to DSM-5 Body Dysmorphic Disorder Comparison

DSM-IVDSM-5
Disorder Class: Somatoform DisordersDisorder Class: Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders
A. Preoccupation with an imagined defect in appearance. If a slight physical anomaly is present, the person’s concern is markedly excessive.A. Preoccupation with one or more perceived defects or flaws in physical appearance that are not observable or appear slight to others.
B. At some point during the course of the disorder, the individual has performed repetitive behaviors (e.g., mirror checking, excessive grooming, skin picking, reassurance seeking) or mental acts (e.g., comparing his or her appearance with that of others) in response to the appearance concerns.
B. The preoccupation causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.C. The preoccupation causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational or other areas of functioning.
C. The preoccupation is not better accounted for by another mental disorder (e.g., dissatisfaction with body shape and size in anorexia nervosa).D. The appearance preoccupation is not better explained by concerns with body fat or weight in an individual whose symptoms meet diagnostic criteria for an eating disorder.
--Specify if:
  • With muscle dysmorphia: The individual is preoccupied with the idea that his or her body build is too small or insufficiently muscular. This specifier is used even if the individual is preoccupied with other body areas, which is often the case.
Specify if:
  • Indicate degree of insight regarding body dysmorphic disorder beliefs (e.g., “I look ugly” or “I look deformed”).
    • With good or fair insight: The individual recognizes that the body dysmorphic disorder beliefs are definitely or probably not true or that they may or may not be true.
    • With poor insight: The individual thinks that the body dysmorphic beliefs are probably true.
    • With absent insight/delusional beliefs: The individual is completely convinced that the body dysmorphic beliefs are true.

From: 3, DSM-5 Child Mental Disorder Classification

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