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Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. DSM-5 Changes: Implications for Child Serious Emotional Disturbance [Internet]. Rockville (MD): Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (US); 2016 Jun.

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DSM-5 Changes: Implications for Child Serious Emotional Disturbance [Internet].

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Table 22DSM-IV to DSM-5 Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder Comparison

DSM-IVDSM-5
Name: Feeding Disorder of Infancy or Early ChildhoodName: Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder
Disorder Class: Feeding and Eating Disorders of Infancy or Early ChildhoodDisorder Class: Feeding and Eating Disorders
A. Feeding disturbance as manifested by persistent failure to eat adequately with significant failure to gain weight or significant loss of weight over at least 1 month.A. An eating or feeding disturbance (e.g., apparent lack of interest in eating or food; avoidance based on the sensory characteristics of food; concern about aversive consequences of eating) as manifested by persistent failure to meet appropriate nutritional and/or energy needs associated with one (or more) of the following:
  1. Significant weight loss (or failure to achieve expected weight gain or faltering growth in children)
  2. Significant nutritional deficiency.
  3. Dependence on enteral feeding or oral nutritional supplements.
  4. Marked interference with psychosocial functioning.
B. The disturbance is not due to an associated gastrointestinal or other general medical condition (e.g., esophageal reflux).D. The eating disturbance is not attributable to a concurrent medical condition or not better explained by another mental disorder. When the eating disturbance occurs in the context of another mental disorder, the severity of the eating disturbance exceeds that routinely associated with the condition or disorder and warrants additional clinical attention.
C. The disturbance is not better accounted for by another mental disorder (e.g., Rumination Disorder) or by lack of available food.B. The disturbance is not better explained by lack of available food or by an associated culturally sanctioned practice.
--C. The eating disturbance does not occur exclusively during the course of anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, and there is no evidence of a disturbance in the way in which one’s body weight or shape is experienced.
D. The onset is before age 6 years.DROPPED
D. The eating disturbance is not attributable to a concurrent medical condition on not better explained by another mental disorder. When the eating disturbance the eating disturbance occurs in the context of another condition or disorder, the severity of the eating disturbance exceeds that routinely associated with the condition or disorder and warrants additional clinical attention.
Specify if: In remission: After full criteria for avoidance/restrictive food intake disorder were previously met, the criteria have not been met for a sustained period of time.

From: 3, DSM-5 Child Mental Disorder Classification

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