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Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Impact of the DSM-IV to DSM-5 Changes on the National Survey on Drug Use and Health [Internet]. Rockville (MD): Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (US); 2016 Jun.

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Impact of the DSM-IV to DSM-5 Changes on the National Survey on Drug Use and Health [Internet].

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Table 3.38DSM-IV to DSM-5 Gambling Disorder Comparison

DSM-IVDSM-5
Name: Pathological GamblingName: Gambling Disorder
Disorder Class: Impulse-Control Disorders Not Classified ElsewhereDisorder Class: Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders
A. Persistent and recurrent maladaptive gambling behavior as indicated by five (or more) of the following:Persistent and recurrent problematic gambling behavior leading to clinically significant impairment or distress, as indicated by the individual exhibiting four (or more) of the following in a 12-month period:
 1. is preoccupied with gambling (e.g., preoccupied with reliving past gambling experiences, handicapping or planning the next venture, or thinking of ways to get money with which to gamble) 4. Is often preoccupied with gambling (e.g., having persistent thoughts of reliving past gambling experiences, handicapping or planning the next venture, thinking of ways to get money with which to gamble).
 2. needs to gamble with increasing amounts of money in order to achieve the desired excitement 1. SAME
 3. has repeated unsuccessful efforts to control, cut back, or stop gambling 3. SAME
 4. is restless or irritable when attempting to cut down or stop gambling 2. SAME
 5. gambles as a way of escaping from problems or of relieving a dysphoric mood (e.g., feelings of helplessness, guilt, anxiety, depression) 5. Often gambles when feeling distressed (e.g., helpless, guilty, anxious, depressed).
 6. after losing money gambling, often returns another day to get even (“chasing” one’s losses) 6. SAME
 7. lies to family members, therapist, or others to conceal the extent of involvement with gambling 7. SAME
 8. has committed illegal acts such as forgery, fraud, theft, or embezzlement to finance gambling DROPPED
 9. has jeopardized or lost a significant relationship, job, or educational or career opportunity because of gambling 8. SAME
 10. relies on others to provide money to relieve a desperate financial situation caused by gambling 9. SAME
B. The gambling behavior is not better accounted for by a Manic Episode.B. The gambling behavior is not better explained by a manic episode.
 N/ASpecify if:
Episodic: Meeting diagnostic criteria at more than one time point, with symptoms subsiding between periods of gambling disorder for at least several months.
Persistent: Experiencing continuous symptoms, to meet diagnostic criteria for multiple years.
Specify if:
In early remission: After full criteria for gambling disorder were previously met, none of the criteria for gambling disorder have been met for at least 3 months but for less than 12 months.
In sustained remission: After full criteria for gambling disorder were previously met, none of the criteria for gambling disorder have been met during a period of 12 months or longer.

Specify current severity:
Mild: 4–5 criteria met.
Moderate: 6–7 criteria met.
Severe: 8–9 criteria met.

From: 3, Mental Illness

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