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Institute of Medicine (US) Committee to Review the Federal Response to the Health Effects Associated with the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill; Goldman L, Mitchell A, Patlak M, editors. Review of the Proposal for the Gulf Long-Term Follow-Up Study: Highlights from the September 2010 Workshop. Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2010.

Cover of Review of the Proposal for the Gulf Long-Term Follow-Up Study

Review of the Proposal for the Gulf Long-Term Follow-Up Study: Highlights from the September 2010 Workshop.

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Administrative and Data Oversight Details

DeJuran Richardson of Lake Forest College suggested detailing in the protocol how the GuLF study will be administered, especially how the various components will be coordinated and how the data will be linked and managed. “Such details are extremely important and key to making sure that this quite large effort is kept on course,” he said. Large studies with similar complexity that do not work well often do not pay attention to these administrative details.

He called for putting in place protocols for everyday management that ensure the timely feedback of information to those who can use it, so that adjustments to study operations can be made when needed. Plans also need to be put into place, he added, to ensure data compatibility, linkage, quality, and updating. David Tollerud also suggested developing a sustainability plan that will detail how the investigation will be sustained in the future.

Dale Sandler responded that regular meetings with contractors, steering committees, and advisory boards are planned; and Richard Kwok, a GuLF study coinvestigator, added that the GuLF study is also building on the administrative templates used in other similarly large and complex cohort studies. Dr. Sandler noted that BP contractors collected many data that they are willing to share, but that such data from different groups need to be assessed for comparability and that it is hard to put data into a common language. Also, some of the data that the BP contractors collected were not collected with the intent of being useful for research, she said.

Copyright © 2010, National Academy of Sciences.
Bookshelf ID: NBK50910

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